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How was Trenton?

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  • Christian Liendo
    I got stuck in the city this weekend. How was Trenton? Honestly, did I miss anything?
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 28 5:52 AM
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      I got stuck in the city this weekend.
      How was Trenton?
      Honestly, did I miss anything?

    • Evan Koblentz
      ... See my email from Sunday night. Summary: Trenton was smaller than any edition in recent memory, but the MARCH booth had good traffic. I doubt that we
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 28 6:02 AM
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        I got stuck in the city this weekend.
        How was Trenton?
        Honestly, did I miss anything?
        See my email from Sunday night.

        Summary: Trenton was smaller than any edition in recent memory, but the MARCH booth had good traffic.  I doubt that we missed much by only going for one day.
      • Christian Liendo
        Well I am going to see all the fellas at the Spring party... Other than the MARCH booth, anything cool? Was the flea market as small as ever? Anyone pickup
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 28 7:52 AM
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          Well I am going to see all the fellas at the Spring party...

          Other than the MARCH booth, anything cool?
          Was the flea market as small as ever?
          Anyone pickup anything cool other than LED flashlights?



          --- On Tue, 4/28/09, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

          From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
          Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] How was Trenton?
          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, April 28, 2009, 9:02 AM

          I got stuck in the city this weekend.
          How was Trenton?
          Honestly, did I miss anything?
          See my email from Sunday night.

          Summary: Trenton was smaller than any edition in recent memory, but the MARCH booth had good traffic.  I doubt that we missed much by only going for one day.


        • Evan Koblentz
          Some people said the robotics booths were cool, but that is subjective. Most of the robots I saw struck me more as R/C toys than real robots. Flea market --
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 28 8:26 AM
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            Some people said the robotics booths were cool, but that is subjective.  Most of the robots I saw struck me more as R/C toys than real robots.

            Flea market -- Herb said he found some stuff, but the area looked minuscule to me.
            Well I am going to see all the fellas at the Spring party...

            Other than the MARCH booth, anything cool?
            Was the flea market as small as ever?
            Anyone pickup anything cool other than LED flashlights?



            --- On Tue, 4/28/09, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

            From: Evan Koblentz <evan@...>
            Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] How was Trenton?
            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, April 28, 2009, 9:02 AM

            I got stuck in the city this weekend.
            How was Trenton?
            Honestly, did I miss anything?
            See my email from Sunday night.

            Summary: Trenton was smaller than any edition in recent memory, but the MARCH booth had good traffic.  I doubt that we missed much by only going for one day.

          • rkushnier
            A Sad Day at the Flea Market I admit, I hadn t been to a computer flea market for awhile. So I was a little taken aback when I saw the small size of the market
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 28 9:46 AM
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              A Sad Day at the Flea Market

              I admit, I hadn't been to a computer flea market for awhile. So I was a little taken aback when I saw the small size of the market area at the 2009 Trenton Computer Festival. I remembered the acres and acres of tables from previous years.

              Yet, it wasn't the small size of the area that made me sad. It was the items which were being sold. I remember thinking, "Most of this stuff should have been thrown away years ago"!

              In old dusty boxes were the "Woody, the cowboy" era laptops. Everyone was inside the exhibit halls playing with "Buzz Lightyear". I'm all for vintage computing, but most of this stuff had no historical value, and was totally useless for modern day computing. Yes, I guess you could put LINUX on some of it, and use it for word processing, but that was about it.

              Old technology is a sorry state to think about, and seeing so much of it in one place, brought a tear to my eye.

              Ron
            • Bill Degnan
              The problem is that computer shows can t compete with the internet. A classic of economic game theory. Why schlub a bunch of stuff onto a table many miles
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 28 10:06 AM
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                The problem is that computer shows can't compete with the internet. A
                classic of economic game theory. Why schlub a bunch of stuff onto a table
                many miles from your house if you can take a picture and sell online
                instead? If you had a nice ADM 3A terminal to sell would you expect to get
                more at a flea market or on Ebay? Sellers will on average always get more
                $$ selling online because there are more potential buyers, a seller can
                take pictures of the item in action, and there is no load/unload until
                after the sale. If you have home pickup from UPS, even easier. Despite
                the high shipping costs for heavy items it's a wash as far as comparing to
                flea markets. If you live near enough to visit a flea market, you would
                also be able to offer pick up of your expensive-to-ship items from an
                internet sale. I am not saying flea markets are dead or that I don't like
                to go to them (I do!)...I am just saying that unless you have 3000+ people
                going to Trenton's flea market, no sellers are going to show up with good
                stuff.

                I would not be depressed, everything has it's day. As I understand it,
                vintage computers are defined generally as being pre-1990 produced. The
                days of finding any pre 1990's stuff of any value at a flea market, even
                Trenton, are numbered.

                We've entered a new era. Vintage computers as we define them are going to
                start getting too rare to pick up casually, and that's what's so great
                about the MARCH collection at InfoAge.


                Bill

                -------- Original Message --------
                > From: "rkushnier" <rkushnier@...>
                > Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2009 12:47 PM
                > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: How was Trenton?
                >
                > A Sad Day at the Flea Market
                >
                > I admit, I hadn't been to a computer flea market for awhile. So I was a
                little taken aback when I saw the small size of the market area at the 2009
                Trenton Computer Festival. I remembered the acres and acres of tables from
                previous years.
                >
                > Yet, it wasn't the small size of the area that made me sad. It was the
                items which were being sold. I remember thinking, "Most of this stuff
                should have been thrown away years ago"!
                >
                > In old dusty boxes were the "Woody, the cowboy" era laptops. Everyone was
                inside the exhibit halls playing with "Buzz Lightyear". I'm all for vintage
                computing, but most of this stuff had no historical value, and was totally
                useless for modern day computing. Yes, I guess you could put LINUX on some
                of it, and use it for word processing, but that was about it.
                >
                > Old technology is a sorry state to think about, and seeing so much of it
                in one place, brought a tear to my eye.
                >
                > Ron
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • Sridhar Ayengar
                ... Before Evan gets to it, schlub != schlep. Peace... Sridhar
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 28 10:46 AM
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                  Bill Degnan wrote:
                  > classic of economic game theory. Why schlub a bunch of stuff onto a table

                  Before Evan gets to it, schlub != schlep.

                  Peace... Sridhar
                • Dan Roganti
                  Bill Degnan wrote: The problem is that computer shows can t compete with the internet. A classic of economic game theory. Why schlub a bunch of stuff onto a
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 28 3:03 PM
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                    Bill Degnan wrote:
                    The problem is that computer shows can't compete with the internet.  A 
                    classic of economic game theory.  Why schlub a bunch of stuff onto a table 
                    many miles from your house if you can take a picture and sell online 
                    instead?  

                    Add to this the problem of all the other events surrounding TCF during the year which also attract many people, more in some respect, such as Too Many Games[PA], MagFest[VA], and some more Northeast

                    I think TCF may have to evolve into some higher than rely on the same ol' warehouse computer retailers to attract people. There ought be a smaller area set aside for this. Perhaps some more attractions could be added -- I think the robot competition was a good way to start attracting people. They have to diversify some more.

                    =Dan
                    [ = http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/   ]

                  • Bob Schwier
                    On the other hand, at Trenton, you can test the damned thing and see if it works instead of accepting delivery on something that turns out to be a paperweight.
                    Message 9 of 9 , Apr 29 6:03 AM
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                      On the other hand, at Trenton, you can test the damned thing and see if it
                      works instead of accepting delivery on something that turns out to be a
                      paperweight.
                      bs





                      Quoting Bill Degnan <billdeg@...>:

                      > The problem is that computer shows can't compete with the internet. A
                      > classic of economic game theory. Why schlub a bunch of stuff onto a table
                      > many miles from your house if you can take a picture and sell online
                      > instead? If you had a nice ADM 3A terminal to sell would you expect to get
                      > more at a flea market or on Ebay? Sellers will on average always get more
                      > $$ selling online because there are more potential buyers, a seller can
                      > take pictures of the item in action, and there is no load/unload until
                      > after the sale. If you have home pickup from UPS, even easier. Despite
                      > the high shipping costs for heavy items it's a wash as far as comparing to
                      > flea markets. If you live near enough to visit a flea market, you would
                      > also be able to offer pick up of your expensive-to-ship items from an
                      > internet sale. I am not saying flea markets are dead or that I don't like
                      > to go to them (I do!)...I am just saying that unless you have 3000+ people
                      > going to Trenton's flea market, no sellers are going to show up with good
                      > stuff.
                      >
                      > I would not be depressed, everything has it's day. As I understand it,
                      > vintage computers are defined generally as being pre-1990 produced. The
                      > days of finding any pre 1990's stuff of any value at a flea market, even
                      > Trenton, are numbered.
                      >
                      > We've entered a new era. Vintage computers as we define them are going to
                      > start getting too rare to pick up casually, and that's what's so great
                      > about the MARCH collection at InfoAge.
                      >
                      >
                      > Bill
                      >
                      > -------- Original Message --------
                      > > From: "rkushnier" <rkushnier@...>
                      > > Sent: Tuesday, April 28, 2009 12:47 PM
                      > > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: How was Trenton?
                      > >
                      > > A Sad Day at the Flea Market
                      > >
                      > > I admit, I hadn't been to a computer flea market for awhile. So I was a
                      > little taken aback when I saw the small size of the market area at the 2009
                      > Trenton Computer Festival. I remembered the acres and acres of tables from
                      > previous years.
                      > >
                      > > Yet, it wasn't the small size of the area that made me sad. It was the
                      > items which were being sold. I remember thinking, "Most of this stuff
                      > should have been thrown away years ago"!
                      > >
                      > > In old dusty boxes were the "Woody, the cowboy" era laptops. Everyone was
                      > inside the exhibit halls playing with "Buzz Lightyear". I'm all for vintage
                      > computing, but most of this stuff had no historical value, and was totally
                      > useless for modern day computing. Yes, I guess you could put LINUX on some
                      > of it, and use it for word processing, but that was about it.
                      > >
                      > > Old technology is a sorry state to think about, and seeing so much of it
                      > in one place, brought a tear to my eye.
                      > >
                      > > Ron
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ------------------------------------
                      > >
                      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ------------------------------------
                      >
                      > Yahoo! Groups Links
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
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