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Re: [midatlanticretro] computer museums

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  • Dan Roganti
    Here s a relatively new one in Albuquerque, home of the Altair, that I had in my list. STARTUP http://www.startupgallery.org/ Even though they say it s an
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 1, 2009
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      Here's a relatively new one in Albuquerque, home of the Altair, that I had in my list. STARTUP  http://www.startupgallery.org/
      Even though they say it's an exhibition, it's a rather large floor inside their museum of Natural History and Science in NM.

      I think if a brick 'n mortar location has a collection of artifacts which is open to the public, preserves them, and offers some level of educational insight, it shouldn't matter if it happens to be a private or public collection.

      One day I like to visit Digibarn too.

      =Dan
      [ = http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/   ]


      Evan Koblentz wrote:
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      I haven't counted in the past two years, but in 2006-2007 there were 15-ish "real" computer museums in the U.S. .... I don't count private collections other than Bruce Damer's Digibarn.  I also don't count organizations that have a display case or two and call it a museum (sorry, Bill & U. of Delaware!), nor the zillions of sites whose owners claim to be a "museum" and who say, "Sure, someday I plan to get a building and blah blah blah" .....

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    • B Degnan
      ... I never counted the U of D as a museum either, FYI. A display case doth not a museum make. I realize that Evan and I have a healthy difference of opinion
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 1, 2009
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        Evan Koblentz wrote:
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        > I haven't counted in the past two years, but in 2006-2007 there were
        > 15-ish "real" computer museums in the U.S. .... I don't count private
        > collections other than Bruce Damer's Digibarn. I also don't count
        > organizations that have a display case or two and call it a museum
        > (sorry, Bill & U. of Delaware!), nor the zillions of sites whose
        > owners claim to be a "museum" and who say, "Sure, someday I plan to
        > get a building and blah blah blah" .....
        I never counted the U of D as a museum either, FYI. A display case doth
        not a museum make.

        I realize that Evan and I have a healthy difference of opinion BUT here
        is my 2 cents:

        System Source is bigger than most "traditional" museums. It's always
        open to the public. It has professional exhibits, it has media/audio
        presentations as part of the layout. It has more "clean" computers in
        exhibits than any museum I have been to or seen online except for
        Digibarn and the Computer History Museum and few others. Plenty of docs
        and paper on dispaly too. Don't let the web site limit your
        expectations (http://www.syssrc.com/html/museum/). They have a larger
        inventory than MARCH. Whatever you call it, it's still worth the trip
        if for only the awe factor. BUT - I don't need to call it a museum in
        the traditional sense to claim it's worth the trip. I agree that a
        private collection that is housed within the business/work space is not
        a traditional museum, but what musuem has a working linotype machine on
        site? They needed a tractor trailer to haul and install the thing (I
        helped). PLUS they have pallets of unopened IMSAIs, Cromemcos, etc

        If you live in the southern MidAtlantic, it's by far the largest
        collection of vintage computers you'll ever see. Prove me wrong - see
        for yourself :-)

        Bill
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