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Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Vintage Video Game Systems (was: Mattel Aquarius accessories)

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  • Bill Dromgoole
    RCA female to F .Use this to connect cable with male RCA connector to the splitter or switch. http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103471 or
    Message 1 of 26 , Feb 22, 2009
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      RCA female to F .Use this to connect cable with male RCA connector to the splitter or switch.
      or use this less expensive RCA female to F adapter.
       
      Rca Male to F adapter. Use for units that have female RCA connectors along with a short coax cable to connect to the splitter or switch
       
      Or use this for a right ange RCA male to F adapter if it is more convienient.
       
      Bill #3
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Friday, February 20, 2009 5:18 PM
      Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: Vintage Video Game Systems (was: Mattel Aquarius accessories)

      The RF output devices have either a permanent cable attached with a male RCA connector, or a female RCA port (to which one would connect a MM RCA cable.)   To connect them to a modern TV that has F-connector coaxial input (cable/antenna input) one can use an adapter like Evan describes and it works just fine.  The difficulty comes when one has 3 or 4 of these devices to connect to a TV (and also still has to deal with the cable TV or antenna input to watch regular TV!)   I need a switchbox of some sort that either switches the source with F-connectors all around (I would need an adapter for each device), switches the source using RCA connectors (only one adapter needed), or accepts RF RCA input and converts (and switches) to composite output.  This last device would be ideal, but I don't know that one exists.

      Ah the joys of old technology!  :)  I'm considering taking my spare Atari 2600 and modifying it for composite output.  There used to be a kit you could buy (I presume it used alligator clips or somesuch) that allowed you to do this without modifying the 2600, but I'm pretty sure I can do it if I don't mind a permanent modification.  Has anyone tried this?  It pretty much involves removing the RF modulator and grabbing the chrominance and luminance signals directly (plus audio.)  Seems like a pretty simple and straightforward hack, but it *is* a hack.

      - Bob


      >>> I'm still working on a better solution for the older ones with RF
      output only. 

      Just use RF-to-coax adapters. They are very inexpensive and give a better
      picture. 
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