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Bob's Z80 in-circuit Emulator

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  • Bill Degnan
    I thought I d mention that Bob Grieb and I have been testing his Z80 in-circuit emulator and it works very well so far. It s a kit Bob built and I have a
    Message 1 of 10 , Jan 18, 2009
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      I thought I'd mention that Bob Grieb and I have been testing his Z80
      in-circuit emulator and it works very well so far. It's a kit Bob built
      and I have a thread about it here
      http://vintagecomputer.net/browse_thread.cfm?id=210

      In simple terms you pull out the Z80 from a computer and replace with the
      emulator and then you can enter monitor-like commands to check memory, and
      perform various tests.

      To open the discussion to the group...Bob...is there a way to run one of
      these in a stealth mode by default, and act like the z80 it replaced? This
      way you know the computer is acting "normally" with the emulator running
      while also being able to run memory search commands (non destructive)? A
      person would have to turn on "CPU stop" mode to run destructive memory
      tests (and then reboot to return to stealth mode).

      Am I correct that there is not a way I can do this with the current
      version?

      Bill
    • Bob Grieb
      Bill,    Are you asking if there is a way to have the emulator come up running, so you turn on the computer after plugging it in, and it would boot normally,
      Message 2 of 10 , Jan 18, 2009
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        Bill,

           Are you asking if there is a way to have the emulator
        come up running, so you turn on the computer after plugging
        it in, and it would boot normally, then you could type "q" to stop
        it, so you could use the ICE commands? 

        If so, that is something
        that I thought of but didn't get around to implementing.

           There

        --- On Sun, 1/18/09, Bill Degnan <billdeg@...> wrote:
        From: Bill Degnan <billdeg@...>
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] Bob's Z80 in-circuit Emulator
        To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, January 18, 2009, 10:21 AM

        I thought I'd mention that Bob Grieb and I have been testing his Z80
        in-circuit emulator and it works very well so far. It's a kit Bob built
        and I have a thread about it here
        http://vintagecompu ter.net/browse_ thread.cfm? id=210

        In simple terms you pull out the Z80 from a computer and replace with the
        emulator and then you can enter monitor-like commands to check memory, and
        perform various tests.

        To open the discussion to the group...Bob. ..is there a way to run one of
        these in a stealth mode by default, and act like the z80 it replaced? This
        way you know the computer is acting "normally" with the emulator running
        while also being able to run memory search commands (non destructive) ? A
        person would have to turn on "CPU stop" mode to run destructive memory
        tests (and then reboot to return to stealth mode).

        Am I correct that there is not a way I can do this with the current
        version?

        Bill


      • Bob Grieb
        Why does pressing Tab send my reply?  Very annoying. Take two: Bill,    Are you asking if there is a way to have the emulator come up running, so you turn
        Message 3 of 10 , Jan 18, 2009
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          Why does pressing Tab send my reply?  Very annoying.

          Take two:

          Bill,

             Are you asking if there is a way to have the emulator
          come up running, so you turn on the computer after plugging
          it in, and it would boot normally, then you could type "q" to stop
          it, so you could use the ICE commands? 

          If so, that is something that I thought of but didn't get around to implementing.  There would be a command to set the startup
          behavior to either enable or disable "autorun".  That setting would
          be saved in EEPROM, and used whenever the ICE starts up.  Is that what you are talking about?

            Bob

          --- On Sun, 1/18/09, Bill Degnan <billdeg@...> wrote:
          From: Bill Degnan <billdeg@...>
          Subject: [midatlanticretro] Bob's Z80 in-circuit Emulator
          To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, January 18, 2009, 10:21 AM

          I thought I'd mention that Bob Grieb and I have been testing his Z80
          in-circuit emulator and it works very well so far. It's a kit Bob built
          and I have a thread about it here
          http://vintagecompu ter.net/browse_ thread.cfm? id=210

          In simple terms you pull out the Z80 from a computer and replace with the
          emulator and then you can enter monitor-like commands to check memory, and
          perform various tests.

          To open the discussion to the group...Bob. ..is there a way to run one of
          these in a stealth mode by default, and act like the z80 it replaced? This
          way you know the computer is acting "normally" with the emulator running
          while also being able to run memory search commands (non destructive) ? A
          person would have to turn on "CPU stop" mode to run destructive memory
          tests (and then reboot to return to stealth mode).

          Am I correct that there is not a way I can do this with the current
          version?

          Bill


        • B Degnan
          Yes. I d like with confidence to know that I am monitoring the exact state the computer would have been in, were the original z80 installed.
          Message 4 of 10 , Jan 18, 2009
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            Yes. I'd like with confidence to know that I am monitoring the exact
            state the computer would have been in, were the original z80 installed.

            Bob Grieb wrote:
            > <!-- #ygrp-mkp{ border: 1px solid #d8d8d8; font-family: Arial; margin:
            > 14px 0px; padding: 0px 14px; } #ygrp-mkp hr{ border: 1px solid
            > #d8d8d8; } #ygrp-mkp #hd{ color: #628c2a; font-size: 85%; font-weight:
            > bold; line-height: 122%; margin: 10px 0px; } #ygrp-mkp #ads{
            > margin-bottom: 10px; } #ygrp-mkp .ad{ padding: 0 0; } #ygrp-mkp .ad a{
            > color: #0000ff; text-decoration: none; } -->
            > <snip>
            >
            > Bill,
            >
            > Are you asking if there is a way to have the emulator
            > come up running, so you turn on the computer after plugging
            > it in, and it would boot normally, then you could type "q" to stop
            > it, so you could use the ICE commands?
            >
            > If so, that is something that I thought of but didn't get around to
            > implementing. There would be a command to set the startup
            > behavior to either enable or disable "autorun". That setting would
            > be saved in EEPROM, and used whenever the ICE starts up. Is that what
            > you are talking about?
            >
            > Bob
            >
          • Mike Loewen
            I downloaded Dave Gesswein s collection of vintage ASCII art, and printed several of them this afternoon: http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/ASCII/
            Message 5 of 10 , Jan 18, 2009
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              I downloaded Dave Gesswein's collection of vintage ASCII art, and
              printed several of them this afternoon:

              http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/ASCII/

              It's been a LONG time since I've seen these, and I'm happy with how
              they turned out.


              Mike Loewen mloewen@...
              Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
            • Mike Loewen
              ... I dislike replying to my own posts, but I ran across a site which indicated that these pictures might have to be printed at 8 lines per inch, instead of
              Message 6 of 10 , Jan 19, 2009
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                On Sun, 18 Jan 2009, Mike Loewen wrote:

                > I downloaded Dave Gesswein's collection of vintage ASCII art, and
                > printed several of them this afternoon:
                >
                > http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/ASCII/

                I dislike replying to my own posts, but I ran across a site which
                indicated that these pictures might have to be printed at 8 lines per
                inch, instead of the normal 6LPI. Can anyone confirm or deny that?

                http://www.ifb.co.uk/~darth001/programming.html


                Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
              • Dan Roganti
                Mike Loewen wrote: On Sun, 18 Jan 2009, Mike Loewen wrote: I downloaded Dave Gesswein s collection of vintage ASCII art, and printed several of them this
                Message 7 of 10 , Jan 19, 2009
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                  Mike Loewen wrote:
                  On Sun, 18 Jan 2009, Mike Loewen wrote:
                  
                    
                     I downloaded Dave Gesswein's collection of vintage ASCII art, and
                  printed several of them this afternoon:
                  
                  http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/ASCII/
                      
                      I dislike replying to my own posts, but I ran across a site which 
                  indicated that these pictures might have to be printed at 8 lines per 
                  inch, instead of the normal 6LPI.  Can anyone confirm or deny that?
                  
                  http://www.ifb.co.uk/~darth001/programming.html
                  
                    

                  ah-ha
                  That might explain why the aspect ratio of the images are a little off. Mona Lisa's face is quite elongated and Spock's face is rather wide(since it's printed sideways)

                  =Dan
                  [ = http://www2.applegate.org/~ragooman/   ]

                • B Degnan
                  ... Thanks for the pictures.
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jan 19, 2009
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                    >
                    > Mike Loewen wrote:
                    >> On Sun, 18 Jan 2009, Mike Loewen wrote:
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>> I downloaded Dave Gesswein's collection of vintage ASCII art, and
                    >>> printed several of them this afternoon:
                    >>>
                    >>> http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/ASCII/
                    >>>

                    Thanks for the pictures.
                  • Mike Loewen
                    Several print files in Dave Gesswein s ASCII Art collection had the name Sam Harbison from Princeton in 1973. I was able to track down an email address for
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jan 25, 2009
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                      Several print files in Dave Gesswein's ASCII Art collection had the
                      name "Sam Harbison" from Princeton in 1973. I was able to track down an
                      email address for Sam, and sent a note asking about the process used to
                      create those images. With his permission, I posted his response on my
                      ASCII Art page:

                      http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/ASCII/

                      Briefly, he used a drum-type digital densitometer to scan a negative
                      image, then converted the date to 16-level grayscale to be printed on a
                      chain printer driven by an IBM 360/91. I was glad to receive his
                      response, since details on this process are hard to come by.

                      I also reprinted the 3 images on my page at 8 lines-per-inch and the
                      perspective looks much better. I'm going to hang these in the hall at the
                      Penn State computer building. :-)


                      Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                      Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                    • Ray Sills
                      OK, Mike: So where s the picture of Lenna Sjooblom? ... 73 de Ray
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jan 25, 2009
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                        OK, Mike:

                        So where's the picture of Lenna Sjooblom?

                        :)

                        73 de Ray

                        On Jan 25, 2009, at 8:18 PM, Mike Loewen wrote:

                        >
                        > Several print files in Dave Gesswein's ASCII Art collection had
                        > the
                        > name "Sam Harbison" from Princeton in 1973. I was able to track
                        > down an
                        > email address for Sam, and sent a note asking about the process
                        > used to
                        > create those images. With his permission, I posted his response on my
                        > ASCII Art page:
                        >
                        > http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/ASCII/
                        >
                        > Briefly, he used a drum-type digital densitometer to scan a
                        > negative
                        > image, then converted the date to 16-level grayscale to be printed
                        > on a
                        > chain printer driven by an IBM 360/91. I was glad to receive his
                        > response, since details on this process are hard to come by.
                        >
                        > I also reprinted the 3 images on my page at 8 lines-per-inch
                        > and the
                        > perspective looks much better. I'm going to hang these in the hall
                        > at the
                        > Penn State computer building. :-)
                        >
                        >
                        > Mike Loewen mloewen@...
                        > Old Technology http://sturgeon.css.psu.edu/~mloewen/Oldtech/
                        >
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