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Modern Marvels

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  • Evan Koblentz
    Oooooh, very precise. Narrator discussing vintage televisions just cited a timeframe of back then .
    Message 1 of 21 , Jan 12, 2009
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      Oooooh, very precise.  Narrator discussing vintage televisions just cited a timeframe of "back then".
    • Evan Koblentz
      Oh boy. They re coming back after the commercial to talk about PDAs. How much ya ll want to bet they proclaim the Newton or Pilot to be first and/or that
      Message 2 of 21 , Jan 12, 2009
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        Oh boy.  They're coming back after the commercial to talk about PDAs.  How much ya'll want to bet they proclaim the Newton or Pilot to be "first" and/or that PDAs were "invented" in the 1990s?
         
        Reality check: 1978.
      • Dan Roganti
        Evan Koblentz wrote: Message Oh boy. They re coming back after the commercial to talk about PDAs. How much ya ll want to bet they proclaim the Newton or Pilot
        Message 3 of 21 , Jan 12, 2009
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          Evan Koblentz wrote:
          Message
          Oh boy.  They're coming back after the commercial to talk about PDAs.  How much ya'll want to bet they proclaim the Newton or Pilot to be "first" and/or that PDAs were "invented" in the 1990s?
           
          Reality check: 1978.

          Why didn't they consult with you ?

          I still have that Polaroid model 95 camera from my parents

          =Dan
        • Evan Koblentz
          Palm pioneered the granddaddy of .... Errr no. MOTHERFU**** Palm guy just held up a Treo 600 and said, the first real (some adjective that I misheard)
          Message 4 of 21 , Jan 12, 2009
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            "Palm pioneered the granddaddy of ...."
             
            Errr no.
             
            MOTHERFU****
             
            Palm guy just held up a Treo 600 and said, "the first real (some adjective that I misheard) smartphone" ..... mind you, this is AFTER the 90s tech episode had a whole discussion of (my!) IBM Simon from 1993.
             
            Idiots.
             
             
            -----Original Message-----
            From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Evan Koblentz
            Sent: Monday, January 12, 2009 8:30 PM
            To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [midatlanticretro] Modern Marvels

            Oh boy.  They're coming back after the commercial to talk about PDAs.  How much ya'll want to bet they proclaim the Newton or Pilot to be "first" and/or that PDAs were "invented" in the 1990s?
             
            Reality check: 1978.
          • Evan Koblentz
            ... Beats me.
            Message 5 of 21 , Jan 12, 2009
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              >>> Why didn't they consult with you ? 
               
              Beats me.
               
               
            • Brian Cirulnick
              ... adjective ... tech ... Uhmmm... Guys... this is TV.. Let me repeat that. T.... V.... There s a reason it s called The idiot box . It s made by idiots for
              Message 6 of 21 , Jan 15, 2009
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                --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Evan Koblentz" <evan@...>
                wrote:
                >
                > "Palm pioneered the granddaddy of ...."
                >
                > Errr no.
                >
                > MOTHERFU****
                >
                > Palm guy just held up a Treo 600 and said, "the first real (some
                adjective
                > that I misheard) smartphone" ..... mind you, this is AFTER the 90s
                tech
                > episode had a whole discussion of (my!) IBM Simon from 1993.
                >
                > Idiots.
                >
                --------------------

                Uhmmm... Guys... this is TV..

                Let me repeat that.

                T.... V....

                There's a reason it's called "The idiot box".
                It's made by idiots for idiots.

                Secondly, we're talking about a network where the majority of their
                shows are Public Domain footage spliced together (incorrectly), then
                given an inappropriate narrative voice-over that doesn't impart any
                real information.

                What were you expecting? That the producer was a geek?
              • bryan.pope@comcast.net
                ... There have been geeky shows on TV, but then they are usually canceled before their time.. :-( Cheers, Bryan
                Message 7 of 21 , Jan 15, 2009
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                  ----- "Brian Cirulnick" <techrat@...> wrote:

                  >
                  > Uhmmm... Guys... this is TV..
                  >
                  > Let me repeat that.
                  >
                  > T.... V....
                  >
                  > There's a reason it's called "The idiot box".
                  > It's made by idiots for idiots.
                  >
                  > Secondly, we're talking about a network where the majority of their
                  > shows are Public Domain footage spliced together (incorrectly), then
                  > given an inappropriate narrative voice-over that doesn't impart any
                  > real information.
                  >
                  > What were you expecting? That the producer was a geek?
                  >

                  There have been "geeky" shows on TV, but then they are usually canceled before their time.. :-(

                  Cheers,

                  Bryan
                   
                • Mark D
                  You know I watched this episode the other day while exercising and couldn t help but notice that this is just simple sponsorship. Palm and palm stuff is
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jan 15, 2009
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                    You know I watched this episode the other day while exercising and
                    couldn't help but notice that this is just simple sponsorship. Palm and
                    palm stuff is littered throughout the episode. It's just product
                    placement. They didn't say either that the palm pilot was the FIRST pda
                    but they said it was the granddaddy of popular PDA's or something like
                    that. And that probably has a grain of truth. I Don't think any of
                    them really caught on well at all before the palm pilot.

                    But yeah, you can't trust it to be too educational when there's obvious
                    product placement going on.

                    The bit about recycling at the end is what annoyed me. Who cares? How
                    does it relate... it doesn't. Throw it into a MM episode about recycling.

                    My personal favorite lately is a show called How It's Made. In a 30
                    minute segment they do 3-4 different products and it's a very no BS
                    immersive look into how a particular product is made.

                    And finally I still maintain that retro means different things to
                    different people based on age ;)

                    Thanks,
                    Mark


                    Brian Cirulnick wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Uhmmm... Guys... this is TV..
                    >
                    > Let me repeat that.
                    >
                    > T.... V....
                    >
                    > There's a reason it's called "The idiot box".
                    > It's made by idiots for idiots.
                    >
                    > Secondly, we're talking about a network where the majority of their
                    > shows are Public Domain footage spliced together (incorrectly), then
                    > given an inappropriate narrative voice-over that doesn't impart any
                    > real information.
                    >
                    > What were you expecting? That the producer was a geek?
                    >
                    >
                  • Evan Koblentz
                    In their defense, for the 90s Tech episode, they totally deferred to my judgment about which company and which facts are important re: IBM Simon and as the
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jan 15, 2009
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                      In their defense, for the 90s Tech episode, they totally deferred to my
                      judgment about which company and which facts are important re: IBM Simon and
                      as the back story of smartphones.

                      Laugh if you will but my favorite now-defunct show was "Monster House"...




                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                      [mailto:midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark D
                      Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2009 4:57 PM
                      To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Modern Marvels


                      You know I watched this episode the other day while exercising and
                      couldn't help but notice that this is just simple sponsorship. Palm and
                      palm stuff is littered throughout the episode. It's just product
                      placement. They didn't say either that the palm pilot was the FIRST pda
                      but they said it was the granddaddy of popular PDA's or something like
                      that. And that probably has a grain of truth. I Don't think any of
                      them really caught on well at all before the palm pilot.

                      But yeah, you can't trust it to be too educational when there's obvious
                      product placement going on.

                      The bit about recycling at the end is what annoyed me. Who cares? How
                      does it relate... it doesn't. Throw it into a MM episode about recycling.

                      My personal favorite lately is a show called How It's Made. In a 30
                      minute segment they do 3-4 different products and it's a very no BS
                      immersive look into how a particular product is made.

                      And finally I still maintain that retro means different things to
                      different people based on age ;)

                      Thanks,
                      Mark


                      Brian Cirulnick wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      > Uhmmm... Guys... this is TV..
                      >
                      > Let me repeat that.
                      >
                      > T.... V....
                      >
                      > There's a reason it's called "The idiot box".
                      > It's made by idiots for idiots.
                      >
                      > Secondly, we're talking about a network where the majority of their
                      > shows are Public Domain footage spliced together (incorrectly), then
                      > given an inappropriate narrative voice-over that doesn't impart any
                      > real information.
                      >
                      > What were you expecting? That the producer was a geek?
                      >
                      >


                      ------------------------------------

                      Yahoo! Groups Links
                    • mejeep_ferret
                      ... I remember a similar show: Hot Dog http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_Dog_(TV_series) http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065301/ barely related: 101 Classic
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jan 18, 2009
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                        > My personal favorite lately is a show called How It's Made. In a 30
                        > minute segment they do 3-4 different products and it's a very no BS
                        > immersive look into how a particular product is made.

                        I remember a similar show: Hot Dog
                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hot_Dog_(TV_series)
                        http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065301/

                        barely related: 101 Classic computer ads
                        http://www.flickr.com/photos/blojer/sets/72157607392439789/
                        I am really happy to see several of the Honeywell component-critters.
                        I adored those ads from my dad's Datamation magazine.
                        I hope we have some in our library.
                      • arkaxow
                        ... PDAs. How ... I finally got around to watching this episode. I m not an expert in the history of PDA s, but it is obvious that they are targeting only
                        Message 11 of 21 , Jan 18, 2009
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                          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Evan Koblentz" <evan@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Oh boy. They're coming back after the commercial to talk about
                          PDAs. How
                          > much ya'll want to bet they proclaim the Newton or Pilot to be "first"
                          > and/or that PDAs were "invented" in the 1990s?
                          >
                          > Reality check: 1978.
                          >

                          I finally got around to watching this episode. I'm not an expert in
                          the history of PDA's, but it is obvious that they are targeting only
                          one companies' products. Granted they are only taking 5-8 minutes out
                          of the whole show to talk about it, I agree that they could have done
                          a better job. One thing M.A.R.C.H. should do is not only educate on
                          the history, but disprove the inaccuracies that become myths, commonly
                          spread misunderstandings and just plain intentional bias. Perhaps our
                          own educational videos, which could eventually be professionally done.
                          Related to this I just downloaded a training manual by Jim
                          Butterfield on the Commodore 64
                          (http://thepiratebay.org/torrent/4394619/DVD_of_Commodore_64_Training_Tape_with_Jim_Butterfield_C_C64).
                          I think videos like this should be part of the future museum because
                          it shows how they work and what it was like when they first came out.

                          It is one thing to complain about badly done things. It is quite
                          another to do something about it to correct misinformation and bias.
                          Just my thoughts on the matter.
                        • Evan Koblentz
                          ... I completely agree. ... I partially disagree. For the majority of our exhibits, we can (or will) have the luxury of live demoing. Don t want people to walk
                          Message 12 of 21 , Jan 18, 2009
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                            >>> One thing M.A.R.C.H. should do is not only educate on the history, but disprove the inaccuracies that become myths, commonly spread misunderstandings and just plain intentional bias.

                            I completely agree.

                            >>> I think videos like this should be part of the future museum because it shows how they work and what it was like when they first came out.

                            I partially disagree. For the majority of our exhibits, we can (or will) have the luxury of live demoing. Don't want people to walk in, watch TV, and walk out -- without seeing the actual exhibit! But what we can do is use video as a supplement for those who want more detail of things that we can't show in real-time. We also might use video for a quick intro and/or brief overview for when we're not around, i.e. we could put a small LCD outside our rooms' main entrance(s), with a button saying "push here if exhibit is closed" and then the viewer would get a short video explaining MARCH, the room's contents, and our open hours and contact info.

                            >>> It is one thing to complain about badly done things. It is quite
                            another to do something about it to correct misinformation and bias.

                            I strongly agree. That's how I am approaching my book, and the museum too.
                          • Joe Giliberti
                            Video demoing could be good mainly as a means of educating the masses that cannot make it to the museum, for distribution on Youtube, for example. Joe ... --
                            Message 13 of 21 , Jan 18, 2009
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                              Video demoing could be good mainly as a means of educating the masses that cannot make it to the museum, for distribution on Youtube, for example.

                              Joe

                              On Sun, Jan 18, 2009 at 2:54 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

                              >>> One thing M.A.R.C.H. should do is not only educate on the history, but disprove the inaccuracies that become myths, commonly spread misunderstandings and just plain intentional bias.

                              I completely agree.

                              >>> I think videos like this should be part of the future museum because it shows how they work and what it was like when they first came out.

                              I partially disagree. For the majority of our exhibits, we can (or will) have the luxury of live demoing. Don't want people to walk in, watch TV, and walk out -- without seeing the actual exhibit! But what we can do is use video as a supplement for those who want more detail of things that we can't show in real-time. We also might use video for a quick intro and/or brief overview for when we're not around, i.e. we could put a small LCD outside our rooms' main entrance(s), with a button saying "push here if exhibit is closed" and then the viewer would get a short video explaining MARCH, the room's contents, and our open hours and contact info.

                              >>> It is one thing to complain about badly done things. It is quite
                              another to do something about it to correct misinformation and bias.

                              I strongly agree. That's how I am approaching my book, and the museum too.



                              --
                              "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"

                            • Evan Koblentz
                              Maybe. For now I m in favor of more YouTube videos as we build more exhibits, but they should be commercials to make people come visit in person. That s
                              Message 14 of 21 , Jan 18, 2009
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                                Maybe. For now I'm in favor of more YouTube videos as we build more exhibits, but they should be commercials to make people come visit in person.

                                That's something Infoage should do too, not just MARCH, but it would be cool if we lead the way.


                                From: "Joe Giliberti"
                                Date: Sun, 18 Jan 2009 15:04:41 -0500
                                To: <midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
                                Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Modern Marvels

                                Video demoing could be good mainly as a means of educating the masses that cannot make it to the museum, for distribution on Youtube, for example.

                                Joe

                                On Sun, Jan 18, 2009 at 2:54 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

                                >>> One thing M.A.R.C.H. should do is not only educate on the history, but disprove the inaccuracies that become myths, commonly spread misunderstandings and just plain intentional bias.

                                I completely agree.

                                >>> I think videos like this should be part of the future museum because it shows how they work and what it was like when they first came out.

                                I partially disagree. For the majority of our exhibits, we can (or will) have the luxury of live demoing. Don't want people to walk in, watch TV, and walk out -- without seeing the actual exhibit! But what we can do is use video as a supplement for those who want more detail of things that we can't show in real-time. We also might use video for a quick intro and/or brief overview for when we're not around, i.e. we could put a small LCD outside our rooms' main entrance(s), with a button saying "push here if exhibit is closed" and then the viewer would get a short video explaining MARCH, the room's contents, and our open hours and contact info.

                                >>> It is one thing to complain about badly done things. It is quite
                                another to do something about it to correct misinformation and bias.

                                I strongly agree. That's how I am approaching my book, and the museum too.



                                --
                                "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"

                              • Brian Cirulnick
                                ... bias. ... I tried this once. I went to the Museum of American History in DC. There, in the basement level was the History of the Information Age which
                                Message 15 of 21 , Jan 20, 2009
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                                  --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "arkaxow" <ark72axow@...>
                                  wrote:
                                  >
                                  > It is one thing to complain about badly done things. It is quite
                                  > another to do something about it to correct misinformation and
                                  bias.
                                  > Just my thoughts on the matter.
                                  >
                                  -----------------------

                                  I tried this once. I went to the Museum of American History in DC.
                                  There, in the basement level was the "History of the Information Age"
                                  which had a whole thing on computers, starting with a huge machine
                                  that calculated balistics trajectories all the way on up the
                                  Macintosh... One of the computers on display was a C=64, which listed
                                  it's CPU as an 8088.

                                  2 days later, when I got home, I made a few calls and eventually
                                  spoke to someone at the museum, and provided them with the info that
                                  the C=64 used the 6510, a deriviative of the 6502 used in the Apple
                                  II, which they also had on display and listed the correct CPU.

                                  I'm willing to bet a dozen pizzas that they never changed the display.

                                  TTYL
                                  Brian C.
                                • Bryan Pope
                                  ... You would probably have had better luck changing the 8088 to 6510 with a magic marker... ;) Cheers, Bryan P.S. And also do not forget to add C=
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Jan 20, 2009
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                                    Brian Cirulnick wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I tried this once. I went to the Museum of American History in DC.
                                    > There, in the basement level was the "History of the Information Age"
                                    > which had a whole thing on computers, starting with a huge machine
                                    > that calculated balistics trajectories all the way on up the
                                    > Macintosh... One of the computers on display was a C=64, which listed
                                    > it's CPU as an 8088.
                                    >
                                    You would probably have had better luck changing the "8088" to "6510"
                                    with a magic marker... ;)

                                    Cheers,

                                    Bryan

                                    P.S. And also do not forget to add "C= Rules!"

                                    > 2 days later, when I got home, I made a few calls and eventually
                                    > spoke to someone at the museum, and provided them with the info that
                                    > the C=64 used the 6510, a deriviative of the 6502 used in the Apple
                                    > II, which they also had on display and listed the correct CPU.
                                    >
                                    > I'm willing to bet a dozen pizzas that they never changed the display.
                                    >
                                    > TTYL
                                    > Brian C.
                                    >
                                  • B Degnan
                                    ... Same goes for a 4016 -- 40*9*6 (inside joke)
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Jan 21, 2009
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                                      Bryan Pope wrote:
                                      > Brian Cirulnick wrote:
                                      >
                                      >> I tried this once. I went to the Museum of American History in DC.
                                      >> There, in the basement level was the "History of the Information Age"
                                      >> which had a whole thing on computers, starting with a huge machine
                                      >> that calculated balistics trajectories all the way on up the
                                      >> Macintosh... One of the computers on display was a C=64, which listed
                                      >> it's CPU as an 8088.
                                      >>
                                      >>
                                      > You would probably have had better luck changing the "8088" to "6510"
                                      > with a magic marker... ;)
                                      >
                                      > Cheers,
                                      >
                                      > Bryan
                                      >
                                      > P.S. And also do not forget to add "C= Rules!"
                                      >
                                      >
                                      Same goes for a 4016 --> 40*9*6

                                      (inside joke)
                                    • Alexey Toptygin
                                      ... Similar thing happened to me in the Polytechnic museum in Moscow over the winter holidays. They have some INMOS boards on display labelled Made in USA . I
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Jan 21, 2009
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                                        On Tue, 20 Jan 2009, Brian Cirulnick wrote:

                                        > I tried this once. I went to the Museum of American History in DC.
                                        > There, in the basement level was the "History of the Information Age"
                                        > which had a whole thing on computers, starting with a huge machine
                                        > that calculated balistics trajectories all the way on up the
                                        > Macintosh... One of the computers on display was a C=64, which listed
                                        > it's CPU as an 8088.
                                        >
                                        > 2 days later, when I got home, I made a few calls and eventually
                                        > spoke to someone at the museum, and provided them with the info that
                                        > the C=64 used the 6510, a deriviative of the 6502 used in the Apple
                                        > II, which they also had on display and listed the correct CPU.
                                        >
                                        > I'm willing to bet a dozen pizzas that they never changed the display.

                                        Similar thing happened to me in the Polytechnic museum in Moscow over the
                                        winter holidays. They have some INMOS boards on display labelled "Made in
                                        USA". I tried to explain to the old women guarding the exhibits that it's
                                        a UK company, but I doubt they gave a damn any more after I left the room.

                                        Alexey
                                      • fairlanefastback
                                        INMOS had a US subsidiary and semiconductor fabrication facilities in the U.S. FYI. ... over the ... Made in ... it s ... room.
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Jan 21, 2009
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                                          INMOS had a US subsidiary and semiconductor fabrication facilities in
                                          the U.S. FYI.

                                          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...>
                                          wrote:

                                          > Similar thing happened to me in the Polytechnic museum in Moscow
                                          over the
                                          > winter holidays. They have some INMOS boards on display labelled
                                          "Made in
                                          > USA". I tried to explain to the old women guarding the exhibits that
                                          it's
                                          > a UK company, but I doubt they gave a damn any more after I left the
                                          room.
                                          >
                                          > Alexey
                                          >
                                        • Alexey Toptygin
                                          ... That made transputer boards? Everything I ve ever heard about transputer development says that it was at INMOS in the UK... do you have any references you
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Jan 21, 2009
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                                            On Wed, 21 Jan 2009, fairlanefastback wrote:

                                            > INMOS had a US subsidiary and semiconductor fabrication facilities in
                                            > the U.S. FYI.

                                            That made transputer boards? Everything I've ever heard about transputer
                                            development says that it was at INMOS in the UK... do you have any
                                            references you can point me at?

                                            Alexey
                                          • fairlanefastback
                                            Wikipedia does not list what was made in Colorado vs. Wales. But someone here could probably answer you: http://www.inmos.com/ Its the website for former
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Jan 23, 2009
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                                              Wikipedia does not list what was made in Colorado vs. Wales. But
                                              someone here could probably answer you:

                                              http://www.inmos.com/

                                              Its the website for former employees to catch up.


                                              --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, Alexey Toptygin <alexeyt@...>
                                              wrote:
                                              >
                                              > On Wed, 21 Jan 2009, fairlanefastback wrote:
                                              >
                                              > > INMOS had a US subsidiary and semiconductor fabrication facilities
                                              in
                                              > > the U.S. FYI.
                                              >
                                              > That made transputer boards? Everything I've ever heard about
                                              transputer
                                              > development says that it was at INMOS in the UK... do you have any
                                              > references you can point me at?
                                              >
                                              > Alexey
                                              >
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