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Re: [midatlanticretro] Possible fun experiment

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  • Ray Sills
    Hi Joe: Good luck with school. Maybe a Tandy 100 would be the way to go. Apparently, they can still be had from that club100 website. And, they will print to
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 3, 2009
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      Hi Joe:

      Good luck with school. Maybe a Tandy 100 would be the way to go.
      Apparently, they can still be had from that club100 website.
      And, they will print to the on-board printer port. I'd have to look,
      but I'd say it is a Centronics parallel type. And I think you can
      spit the files out the RS-232 port as well.

      One nice thing about the T-100 is quick boot-up time... just a second
      or two!

      73 de Ray

      On Jan 3, 2009, at 6:02 PM, Joe Giliberti wrote:

      > I will be starting school (again) in about three weeks. I going at
      > it full time, and none of my classes are a math or (traditional)
      > science base. Therefore, I will be writing lots and lots of notes,
      > and probably a good deal of reports.
      > My handwriting is terrible. I can barely read it, so I'm definitely
      > to be using some type of laptop. However, with all the discussion
      > of AP reporters still using Model 100 Tandys after all these year
      > (whether or not factual) got me thinking: Could I survive a
      > semester of college using mostly a vintage laptop?
      > Now, I am definitely not referring to a Kaypro or an Osbourne. I
      > would want some type of flat screen. I would also require that it
      > be powered by some type of conventional battery (as I'd probably be
      > unable to find a proprietary replacement), be no more than twelve
      > pounds in weight, and have the ability to connect to a printer.
      > Obviously such a machine would not be of much use for web browsing,
      > or digital media, which is good for me. Hopefully it would serve to
      > lessen distractions. The computer labs are always available should
      > I need interweb access on-campus.
      > Lastly, if I were to get started and realize the endevour to be
      > futile, I can always switch back to my 3 month old toshiba.
      > Whaddaya think?
      >
      > Joe
      >
    • Evan Koblentz
      I don t think you will be happy with the 100 s tiny screen and general slowness. You should go on Craigslist and just buy a used modern laptop for a couple
      Message 2 of 19 , Jan 3, 2009
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        I don't think you will be happy with the 100's tiny screen and general slowness.

        You should go on Craigslist and just buy a used modern laptop for a couple hundred bucks. Then load it with Linux and OpenOffice.


        From: "Joe Giliberti"
        Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 18:02:16 -0500
        To: midatlanticretro<midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
        Subject: [midatlanticretro] Possible fun experiment

        I will be starting school (again) in about three weeks. I going at it full time, and none of my classes are a math or (traditional) science base. Therefore, I will be writing lots and lots of notes, and probably a good deal of reports.
        My handwriting is terrible. I can barely read it, so I'm definitely to be using some type of laptop. However, with all the discussion of AP reporters still using Model 100 Tandys after all these year (whether or not factual) got me thinking: Could I survive a semester of college using mostly a vintage laptop?
        Now, I am definitely not referring to a Kaypro or an Osbourne. I would want some type of flat screen. I would also require that it be powered by some type of conventional battery (as I'd probably be unable to find a proprietary replacement), be no more than twelve pounds in weight, and have the ability to connect to a printer.
        Obviously such a machine would not be of much use for web browsing, or digital media, which is good for me. Hopefully it would serve to lessen distractions. The computer labs are always available should I need interweb access on-campus.
        Lastly, if I were to get started and realize the endevour to be futile, I can always switch back to my 3 month old toshiba.
        Whaddaya think?

        Joe


        --
        "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"

      • Bryan Pope
        ... I can agree with your on the tiny screen, but on the slowness? How long does it take to boot up a PC with XP, then start the latest version of Office?
        Message 3 of 19 , Jan 3, 2009
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          Evan Koblentz wrote:
          > I don't think you will be happy with the 100's tiny screen and general
          > slowness.
          I can agree with your on the tiny screen, but on the slowness? How long
          does it take to boot up a PC with XP, then start the latest version of
          Office? Joe could be half done typing War & Peace in that same time
          with a Model 100.. ;) Even a C64 + 1541 + Speedscript would be faster!

          Cheers,

          Bryan

          >
          > You should go on Craigslist and just buy a used modern laptop for a
          > couple hundred bucks. Then load it with Linux and OpenOffice.
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > *From*: "Joe Giliberti"
          > *Date*: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 18:02:16 -0500
          > *To*: midatlanticretro<midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>
          > *Subject*: [midatlanticretro] Possible fun experiment
          > I will be starting school (again) in about three weeks. I going at it
          > full time, and none of my classes are a math or (traditional) science
          > base. Therefore, I will be writing lots and lots of notes, and
          > probably a good deal of reports.
          > My handwriting is terrible. I can barely read it, so I'm definitely to
          > be using some type of laptop. However, with all the discussion of AP
          > reporters still using Model 100 Tandys after all these year (whether
          > or not factual) got me thinking: Could I survive a semester of college
          > using mostly a vintage laptop?
          > Now, I am definitely not referring to a Kaypro or an Osbourne. I would
          > want some type of flat screen. I would also require that it be powered
          > by some type of conventional battery (as I'd probably be unable to
          > find a proprietary replacement), be no more than twelve pounds in
          > weight, and have the ability to connect to a printer.
          > Obviously such a machine would not be of much use for web browsing, or
          > digital media, which is good for me. Hopefully it would serve to
          > lessen distractions. The computer labs are always available should I
          > need interweb access on-campus.
          > Lastly, if I were to get started and realize the endevour to be
          > futile, I can always switch back to my 3 month old toshiba.
          > Whaddaya think?
          >
          > Joe
        • Joe Giliberti
          I already have a modern laptop. This idea is in ignorance of practicality. If it doesn t work, I can fall back on Windows Vista! Joy :) ... -- You work with
          Message 4 of 19 , Jan 3, 2009
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            I already have a modern laptop. This idea is in ignorance of practicality. If it doesn't work, I can fall back on Windows Vista! Joy :)

            On Sat, Jan 3, 2009 at 10:20 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

            I don't think you will be happy with the 100's tiny screen and general slowness.

            You should go on Craigslist and just buy a used modern laptop for a couple hundred bucks. Then load it with Linux and OpenOffice.


            From: "Joe Giliberti"
            Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 18:02:16 -0500
            To: midatlanticretro<midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>

            Subject: [midatlanticretro] Possible fun experiment
            I will be starting school (again) in about three weeks. I going at it full time, and none of my classes are a math or (traditional) science base. Therefore, I will be writing lots and lots of notes, and probably a good deal of reports.
            My handwriting is terrible. I can barely read it, so I'm definitely to be using some type of laptop. However, with all the discussion of AP reporters still using Model 100 Tandys after all these year (whether or not factual) got me thinking: Could I survive a semester of college using mostly a vintage laptop?
            Now, I am definitely not referring to a Kaypro or an Osbourne. I would want some type of flat screen. I would also require that it be powered by some type of conventional battery (as I'd probably be unable to find a proprietary replacement), be no more than twelve pounds in weight, and have the ability to connect to a printer.
            Obviously such a machine would not be of much use for web browsing, or digital media, which is good for me. Hopefully it would serve to lessen distractions. The computer labs are always available should I need interweb access on-campus.
            Lastly, if I were to get started and realize the endevour to be futile, I can always switch back to my 3 month old toshiba.
            Whaddaya think?

            Joe


            --
            "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"




            --
            "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"

          • Matt Patoray
            Joe, Then why not try the Tandy 200,A little bigger but more usefull then the 100. I also belive that it does take AA batteries as well, or get an alphasmart.
            Message 5 of 19 , Jan 4, 2009
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              Joe,

              Then why not try the Tandy 200,A little bigger but more usefull then the 100.
              I also belive that it does take AA batteries as well, or get an alphasmart. Although you might find the nonbacklit display a problem in a darkened classroom, heck I found the non TFT display of the PowerBook 140 a problem, and ended up geting a 170 my 2nd year.

              Sent from my iPhone

              On Jan 4, 2009, at 1:09 AM, "Joe Giliberti" <Starbase89@...> wrote:

              I already have a modern laptop. This idea is in ignorance of practicality. If it doesn't work, I can fall back on Windows Vista! Joy :)

              On Sat, Jan 3, 2009 at 10:20 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

              I don't think you will be happy with the 100's tiny screen and general slowness.

              You should go on Craigslist and just buy a used modern laptop for a couple hundred bucks. Then load it with Linux and OpenOffice.


              From: "Joe Giliberti"
              Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 18:02:16 -0500
              To: midatlanticretro<midatlanticretro@ yahoogroups. com>

              Subject: [midatlanticretro] Possible fun experiment
              I will be starting school (again) in about three weeks. I going at it full time, and none of my classes are a math or (traditional) science base. Therefore, I will be writing lots and lots of notes, and probably a good deal of reports.
              My handwriting is terrible. I can barely read it, so I'm definitely to be using some type of laptop. However, with all the discussion of AP reporters still using Model 100 Tandys after all these year (whether or not factual) got me thinking: Could I survive a semester of college using mostly a vintage laptop?
              Now, I am definitely not referring to a Kaypro or an Osbourne. I would want some type of flat screen. I would also require that it be powered by some type of conventional battery (as I'd probably be unable to find a proprietary replacement) , be no more than twelve pounds in weight, and have the ability to connect to a printer.
              Obviously such a machine would not be of much use for web browsing, or digital media, which is good for me. Hopefully it would serve to lessen distractions. The computer labs are always available should I need interweb access on-campus.
              Lastly, if I were to get started and realize the endevour to be futile, I can always switch back to my 3 month old toshiba.
              Whaddaya think?

              Joe


              --
              "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"




              --
              "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"

            • Jeffrey Frady
              The Dana Alphasmart doesn t sound like a bad idea. That brings the clamshell Apple Newton to mind. ... -- See you space cowboy...
              Message 6 of 19 , Jan 4, 2009
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                The Dana Alphasmart doesn't sound like a bad idea.  That brings the clamshell Apple Newton to mind.

                On Sun, Jan 4, 2009 at 4:16 AM, Matt Patoray <mspatoray@...> wrote:

                Joe,

                Then why not try the Tandy 200,A little bigger but more usefull then the 100.
                I also belive that it does take AA batteries as well, or get an alphasmart. Although you might find the nonbacklit display a problem in a darkened classroom, heck I found the non TFT display of the PowerBook 140 a problem, and ended up geting a 170 my 2nd year.

                Sent from my iPhone

                On Jan 4, 2009, at 1:09 AM, "Joe Giliberti" <Starbase89@...> wrote:

                I already have a modern laptop. This idea is in ignorance of practicality. If it doesn't work, I can fall back on Windows Vista! Joy :)

                On Sat, Jan 3, 2009 at 10:20 PM, Evan Koblentz <evan@...> wrote:

                I don't think you will be happy with the 100's tiny screen and general slowness.

                You should go on Craigslist and just buy a used modern laptop for a couple hundred bucks. Then load it with Linux and OpenOffice.


                From: "Joe Giliberti"
                Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2009 18:02:16 -0500
                To: midatlanticretro<midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com>

                Subject: [midatlanticretro] Possible fun experiment
                I will be starting school (again) in about three weeks. I going at it full time, and none of my classes are a math or (traditional) science base. Therefore, I will be writing lots and lots of notes, and probably a good deal of reports.
                My handwriting is terrible. I can barely read it, so I'm definitely to be using some type of laptop. However, with all the discussion of AP reporters still using Model 100 Tandys after all these year (whether or not factual) got me thinking: Could I survive a semester of college using mostly a vintage laptop?
                Now, I am definitely not referring to a Kaypro or an Osbourne. I would want some type of flat screen. I would also require that it be powered by some type of conventional battery (as I'd probably be unable to find a proprietary replacement), be no more than twelve pounds in weight, and have the ability to connect to a printer.
                Obviously such a machine would not be of much use for web browsing, or digital media, which is good for me. Hopefully it would serve to lessen distractions. The computer labs are always available should I need interweb access on-campus.
                Lastly, if I were to get started and realize the endevour to be futile, I can always switch back to my 3 month old toshiba.
                Whaddaya think?

                Joe


                --
                "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"




                --
                "You work with your females, arm them, and force them to wear clothing!"




                --
                See you space cowboy...
              • Sridhar Ayengar
                ... I use an HP 200LX for that sort of stuff. MS-DOS 5.0, 80186 @8MHz, 4MB RAM (640kB + EMS), 640x200 CGA screen. I still use one on a daily basis today.
                Message 7 of 19 , Jan 5, 2009
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                  Matt Patoray wrote:
                  > Joe,
                  >
                  > Then why not try the Tandy 200,A little bigger but more usefull then the
                  > 100.
                  > I also belive that it does take AA batteries as well, or get an
                  > alphasmart. Although you might find the nonbacklit display a problem in
                  > a darkened classroom, heck I found the non TFT display of the PowerBook
                  > 140 a problem, and ended up geting a 170 my 2nd year.

                  I use an HP 200LX for that sort of stuff.

                  MS-DOS 5.0, 80186 @8MHz, 4MB RAM (640kB + EMS), 640x200 CGA screen.

                  I still use one on a daily basis today.

                  Peace... Sridhar
                • Jim Scheef
                  Joe, While the Model 100 or 200 would both do the job for note taking, they are both SRAM-based and everything is lost if the batteries die. (Flash had not
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jan 5, 2009
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                    Joe,

                    While the Model 100 or 200 would both do the job for note taking, they
                    are both SRAM-based and everything is lost if the batteries die. (Flash
                    had not been invented.) OTOH I found a tool the other day that purports
                    to allow file transfers to/from a Windows machine via null modem cable
                    (presumably a legacy serial port is required). The Model 100 had 32K of
                    user RAM for files provided the machine has all sockets filled. The M200
                    had a max of three banks of 24K with most machines having only the base
                    24K. I have a couple of "option ROMs" from Traveling Software in my
                    collection that gave the M100 a bunch of additional features, but the
                    basic Model T is all that's needed for simple text and the keyboard is
                    great as well. (Heavy typists put orthodontia rubber bands under the
                    keys to soften the impact, and RS sold legs to elevate the back of the
                    M100 to make typing much more comfortable.)

                    There are Model 100s on eBay all the time going for $25 to $70 but Model
                    200s are much less common.

                    This would be a fun experiment, however I don't feel it is worth the
                    risk of losing important class notes. Back in early 90's my girl friend
                    at the time used a M100 to do her library research. After each trip to
                    the library, we would dump her files to my desktop machine where she did
                    her word processing. She was absolutely mortified when I warned her that
                    all of her work would disappear if the batteries died.

                    Jim

                    Sridhar Ayengar wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > Matt Patoray wrote:
                    > > Joe,
                    > >
                    > > Then why not try the Tandy 200,A little bigger but more usefull then the
                    > > 100.
                    > > I also belive that it does take AA batteries as well, or get an
                    > > alphasmart. Although you might find the nonbacklit display a problem in
                    > > a darkened classroom, heck I found the non TFT display of the PowerBook
                    > > 140 a problem, and ended up geting a 170 my 2nd year.
                    >
                    > I use an HP 200LX for that sort of stuff.
                    >
                    > MS-DOS 5.0, 80186 @8MHz, 4MB RAM (640kB + EMS), 640x200 CGA screen.
                    >
                    > I still use one on a daily basis today.
                    >
                    > Peace... Sridhar
                    >
                    >
                  • Brian Cirulnick
                    ... Here are a few other ideas: Windows CE based HPC - advantages: good battery life, instant-on (no boot required), provides an MS-word compatible doc file
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jan 5, 2009
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                      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey Frady"
                      <Legodude522@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > The Dana Alphasmart doesn't sound like a bad idea. That brings the
                      > clamshell Apple Newton to mind.
                      >
                      -------------

                      Here are a few other ideas:

                      Windows CE based HPC - advantages: good battery life, instant-on (no
                      boot required), provides an MS-word compatible doc file (some schools
                      REQUIRE MSword). Disadvantages: requires (often proprietary) serial
                      cable to "sync" w/desktop pc to copy files, requires vintage ni-cad
                      or lithium battery to be in good enough shape to hold a charge.

                      Toshiba T-1000 (style) DOS laptop - advantages: durable as a Model
                      100, and has a good keyboard, usually comes with a complete set of
                      ports (serial, parallel, VGA out) and floppy drive. Many booted from
                      ROM, so boot time is fairly quick. Diadvantages: some only had a
                      floppy drive, so saving files and loading a word processor may be
                      slow. Again, proprietary battery (but can be easily hacked), so
                      holding a charge is questionable after all this time.

                      Atari Portfolio -- Might be too small to be useful.

                      Wp-5 -- I can't remember if that's what it was called, but Tandy made
                      these as well, it was essentially a Model 100 chopped down to be just
                      a word processor. Pretty sure it also ran on AA batteries. My memory
                      is going though, so, don't hold me to this until I have a moment to
                      check on google if this is what it was called.

                      I personally would go for the T-1000 laptop. For a very, very, very
                      long time I used one as my personal "laptop", and only recently have
                      switched to an EEE-PC. Try to find one with the large, backlit screen
                      and DOS on ROM. Mine also had a PCMCIA 2mb ram card which I was able
                      to use as "Drive D", which meant storing my files and apps was on a
                      ram card and was very fast (I just had to remember to backup to
                      floppy). I loved that thing and was sad when it died.

                      ttyl
                      Brian C.
                    • Brian Cirulnick
                      ... They were marketed as the Wp2 and the Wp3... And I just put a bid on a model 200 -- I like the look of those. There s no good T-1000 s I can see on ebay.
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jan 5, 2009
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                        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Cirulnick"
                        <techrat@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Wp-5 -- I can't remember if that's what it was called, but Tandy
                        ------------

                        They were marketed as the Wp2 and the Wp3...

                        And I just put a bid on a model 200 -- I like the look of those.
                        There's no good T-1000's I can see on ebay.

                        And jogging my memory, the model T-1000 I had was the 1000SE -- that
                        was the one with the backlit screen and the PCMCIA type-1 slot.

                        A good solid machine that 1000Se.

                        ttyl
                        Brian C.
                      • Brian Cirulnick
                        ... the ... Those alphasmarts are way too much money (IMHO). However, I remember taking classes at NYU a million years ago and used a regular old palm pilot
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jan 5, 2009
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                          --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Cirulnick"
                          <techrat@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "Jeffrey Frady"
                          > <Legodude522@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > The Dana Alphasmart doesn't sound like a bad idea. That brings
                          the
                          > > clamshell Apple Newton to mind.
                          > >
                          > -------------

                          Those alphasmarts are way too much money (IMHO). However, I remember
                          taking classes at NYU a million years ago and used a regular old palm
                          pilot along with the Landware "Go-Type" keyboard.

                          Advantages: Compact as hell, runs forever off 2 AAA batteries, fairly
                          easy to sync w/Desktop PC to backup your files, will print IF you
                          have infrared port on your printer. Disadvantages: I believe "notes"
                          are limited to 5k per, you can fill that up pretty quickly while
                          typing. No standard ports, and early models didn't even have the
                          infrared.

                          You know, when I think of all the wacky gadgets I've used in my
                          career... I'm amazed I can remember all this crap.

                          ttyl
                          Brian C.
                        • Christopher Blackmon
                          Hard to believe no one suggested the old HP Omnibooks (300, 425, etc). Christopher.
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jan 6, 2009
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                            Hard to believe no one suggested the old HP Omnibooks (300, 425, etc).

                            Christopher.


                          • Jim Scheef
                            Or the long battery life champion of all time, the HP Portable Plus (recharge every 4-5 days in regular use). The execute in place technology of the early
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jan 6, 2009
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                              Or the "long battery life" champion of all time, the HP Portable Plus
                              (recharge every 4-5 days in regular use).

                              The "execute in place" technology of the early Omnibooks was really
                              cool. The PCcard "ROM" in the 300 and 425 held Windows 3.1 code that was
                              not copied to RAM to execute. This saved both disk space and RAM.
                              Unfortunately both became cheap (did I say that?) so EIP never caught
                              on. Those machines may not be all that old, but they are vintage none
                              the less!

                              Jim

                              Christopher Blackmon wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Hard to believe no one suggested the old HP Omnibooks (300, 425, etc).
                              >
                              > Christopher.
                              >
                              >
                              >
                            • Sridhar Ayengar
                              ... I suggested the 200LX which predates those. Peace... Sridhar
                              Message 14 of 19 , Jan 7, 2009
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                                Christopher Blackmon wrote:
                                >
                                > Hard to believe no one suggested the old HP Omnibooks (300, 425, etc).

                                I suggested the 200LX which predates those.

                                Peace... Sridhar
                              • Christopher Blackmon
                                IIRC, the 200LX was introduced in 1994. The Omnibook 300 in 1993. I ve got a couple of 200LX and like them.. but it s hard to do touch typing for note taking
                                Message 15 of 19 , Jan 7, 2009
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                                  IIRC, the 200LX was introduced in 1994.  The Omnibook 300 in 1993.

                                  I've got a couple of 200LX and like them.. but it's hard to do touch typing for note taking on them,
                                  thus why I suggested the omnibook.



                                  From: Sridhar Ayengar <ploopster@...>
                                  To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Wednesday, January 7, 2009 8:08:10 AM
                                  Subject: Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Possible fun experiment

                                  Christopher Blackmon wrote:

                                  >
                                  > Hard to believe no one suggested the old HP Omnibooks (300, 425, etc).

                                  I suggested the 200LX which predates those.

                                  Peace... Sridhar


                                • Jim Scheef
                                  Sridhar, Remember the purpose is note-taking in class. Efficient typing is paramount. Jim
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Jan 7, 2009
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                                    Sridhar,

                                    Remember the purpose is note-taking in class. Efficient typing is paramount.

                                    Jim

                                    Sridhar Ayengar wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Christopher Blackmon wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > > Hard to believe no one suggested the old HP Omnibooks (300, 425, etc).
                                    >
                                    > I suggested the 200LX which predates those.
                                    >
                                    > Peace... Sridhar
                                    >
                                    >
                                  • Sridhar Ayengar
                                    ... I have no trouble whatsoever typing on the 200LX. It s not like it s a Sinclair. Again, I am a touch-typist, and I use a 200LX on a daily basis. Peace...
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Jan 7, 2009
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                                      Jim Scheef wrote:
                                      > Sridhar,
                                      >
                                      > Remember the purpose is note-taking in class. Efficient typing is paramount.

                                      I have no trouble whatsoever typing on the 200LX. It's not like it's a
                                      Sinclair.

                                      Again, I am a touch-typist, and I use a 200LX on a daily basis.

                                      Peace... Sridhar
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