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Re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Short Video of System Source Computer Museum

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  • Jim Scheef
    The video was cool but some transitions were either not smooth or were incomplete as a few images were never shown clearly - even if I let the entire file
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 25, 2008
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      The video was cool but some transitions were either not smooth or were
      incomplete as a few images were never shown clearly - even if I let the
      entire file download before playing it.

      The content was quite interesting. I like the fact that they included a
      One Laptop Per Child XO-1 (the instant collectible from last Christmas)
      as they flashed thru a bunch of portables.

      Jim

      Evan Koblentz wrote:
      >
      >
      > A few thoughts:
      >
      > >>> I fired off a complaint to the developer of the Web site, with details
      > to make my point: this is not an historically accurate or technologically
      > accurate consideration of these devices.
      >
      > Just to clarify, although Bob cited myself and Bill Degnan, we both had very
      > little to do with the result. Bill and I got involved a year or two ago,
      > and our involvement was short-lived. I can't speak for Bill, but I
      > personally am not endorsing anything here.
      >
      > >>> But I take issue with something I see very often, and I'll mention it
      > here in general. It's the tendency to review PAST computers in PRESENT
      > terms, and then to say that "computers" of the past were "off the mark" or
      > "deficient", or as in this case, "almost" computers.
      >
      > I agree 100% with what Herb said.
      >
      > >>> but I know Evan has stopped reading this already as it's too long
      >
      > :-)
      >
      > >>> One can learn FROM THE PAST. Even if it's about old stuff, about old
      > people, and dead technology. You can learn about people, about companies,
      > about design, even about technology. Why make the same "old" mistakes, over
      > and over? Even if you don't like history, maybe you want to avoid old
      > mistakes.
      >
      > Again, I agree 100%. That's something I learned from Sellam a few years
      > ago. Anyone can say, "Here's the past" -- and for some people that is
      > sufficient -- but I think it gets interesting when we say, "Here's what we
      > can LEARN from the past."
      >
      >
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