Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Bally

Expand Messages
  • B Degnan
    ... The Bally Astrovision you mean? It ran BASIC and Z-GRASS languages. Here is a good article on the subject (Winter CES 1981) that includes some stuff about
    Message 1 of 13 , Nov 12, 2008
      games "almost" computers, because many of them could NEVER HAVE BEEN
      "computers". 
          
      I clearly remember one that was:
      
      I recall getting way excited in 1978 when Bally introduced the "Bally 
      Professional Arcade." I was managing an amusement arcade at the time, 
      it was still mostly pinball machines back then, and was pretty into 
      video games (the Atari 2800 was still king!) I was also very excited 
      about the possibilities of "personal" computers such as the recently 
      introduced Apple II but being fresh out of school, I had NO money to 
      spare for either a video game system OR a computer. And then along 
      comes this machine that could play *multiple* video games AND with a 
      few "optional accessories" also be a REAL COMPUTER! Imagine the 
      possibilities of that! Well, I never did manage to scrape together 
      enough to get it but I stayed in love with the idea enough that I did 
      finally pick one up on eBay a few years ago. 
      
        
      The Bally Astrovision you mean?  It ran BASIC and Z-GRASS languages.

      Here is a good article on the subject (Winter CES 1981) that includes some stuff about the Bally Computer.  I have never seen one before, do you have pictures?

      http://vintagecomputer.net/CISC367/Creative%20Computing%20March%201981%20International%20Winter%20Consumer%20Electronics%20Show.pdf

      Bill
    • trailingedge.geo
      ... do ... The first incarnation that hit the market was called the Bally Arcade. Then (call it version 2.0) it was renamed the Astrocade. This was after Bally
      Message 2 of 13 , Nov 12, 2008
        --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, B Degnan <billdeg@...> wrote:
        > The Bally Astrovision you mean? It ran BASIC and Z-GRASS languages.
        >
        > Here is a good article on the subject (Winter CES 1981) that includes
        > some stuff about the Bally Computer. I have never seen one before,
        do
        > you have pictures?

        The first incarnation that hit the market was called the Bally Arcade.
        Then (call it version 2.0) it was renamed the Astrocade. This was after
        Bally was no longer involved. IIRC, I was careful to get the first gen
        version. I'll have to dig it out and see. I'll take some pictures. I
        could even display it at InfoAge if that was appropriate.
      • Evan Koblentz
        ... to make my point: this is not an historically accurate or technologically accurate consideration of these devices. Just to clarify, although Bob cited
        Message 3 of 13 , Nov 12, 2008
          A few thoughts:

          >>> I fired off a complaint to the developer of the Web site, with details
          to make my point: this is not an historically accurate or technologically
          accurate consideration of these devices.

          Just to clarify, although Bob cited myself and Bill Degnan, we both had very
          little to do with the result. Bill and I got involved a year or two ago,
          and our involvement was short-lived. I can't speak for Bill, but I
          personally am not endorsing anything here.

          >>> But I take issue with something I see very often, and I'll mention it
          here in general. It's the tendency to review PAST computers in PRESENT
          terms, and then to say that "computers" of the past were "off the mark" or
          "deficient", or as in this case, "almost" computers.

          I agree 100% with what Herb said.

          >>> but I know Evan has stopped reading this already as it's too long

          :-)

          >>> One can learn FROM THE PAST. Even if it's about old stuff, about old
          people, and dead technology. You can learn about people, about companies,
          about design, even about technology. Why make the same "old" mistakes, over
          and over? Even if you don't like history, maybe you want to avoid old
          mistakes.

          Again, I agree 100%. That's something I learned from Sellam a few years
          ago. Anyone can say, "Here's the past" -- and for some people that is
          sufficient -- but I think it gets interesting when we say, "Here's what we
          can LEARN from the past."
        • Jim Scheef
          The video was cool but some transitions were either not smooth or were incomplete as a few images were never shown clearly - even if I let the entire file
          Message 4 of 13 , Nov 25, 2008
            The video was cool but some transitions were either not smooth or were
            incomplete as a few images were never shown clearly - even if I let the
            entire file download before playing it.

            The content was quite interesting. I like the fact that they included a
            One Laptop Per Child XO-1 (the instant collectible from last Christmas)
            as they flashed thru a bunch of portables.

            Jim

            Evan Koblentz wrote:
            >
            >
            > A few thoughts:
            >
            > >>> I fired off a complaint to the developer of the Web site, with details
            > to make my point: this is not an historically accurate or technologically
            > accurate consideration of these devices.
            >
            > Just to clarify, although Bob cited myself and Bill Degnan, we both had very
            > little to do with the result. Bill and I got involved a year or two ago,
            > and our involvement was short-lived. I can't speak for Bill, but I
            > personally am not endorsing anything here.
            >
            > >>> But I take issue with something I see very often, and I'll mention it
            > here in general. It's the tendency to review PAST computers in PRESENT
            > terms, and then to say that "computers" of the past were "off the mark" or
            > "deficient", or as in this case, "almost" computers.
            >
            > I agree 100% with what Herb said.
            >
            > >>> but I know Evan has stopped reading this already as it's too long
            >
            > :-)
            >
            > >>> One can learn FROM THE PAST. Even if it's about old stuff, about old
            > people, and dead technology. You can learn about people, about companies,
            > about design, even about technology. Why make the same "old" mistakes, over
            > and over? Even if you don't like history, maybe you want to avoid old
            > mistakes.
            >
            > Again, I agree 100%. That's something I learned from Sellam a few years
            > ago. Anyone can say, "Here's the past" -- and for some people that is
            > sufficient -- but I think it gets interesting when we say, "Here's what we
            > can LEARN from the past."
            >
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.