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31457Re: Ok historians. When was the intel hex format introduced...

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  • DougCrawford
    Jun 30, 2013
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      --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "B. Degnan" <billdeg@...> wrote:
      >
      > My instinct is that early 8008/8080 used the motorola S format tapes in
      > homebrew environments, while Intel was switching over to their own Intel
      > Hex format tapes to replace the punchcard format they had been using. They
      > probably could not use the motorola format for legal reasons, but they
      > probably wanted to.
      > bd
      >
      > -------- Original Message --------
      > > From: "Mike" <mike@...>
      > > Sent: Monday, June 17, 2013 10:37 AM
      > > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [midatlanticretro] Re: Ok historians. When was the intel hex
      > format introduced...
      > >
      > > Yes, all classical 8008 code that I've seen, is displayed to the user in
      > octal. However when it comes to I/O, things are different. For instance,
      > the SCELBI tape interface is designed to read and write a 4bit nibbles at a
      > time. All the TTY interface code that I've seen is dealing with 8 bit data
      > bytes.
      > >
      > > regards,
      > > Mike W.
      > >
      > > --- In midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com, "B. Degnan" <billdeg@>
      > wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > -------- Original Message --------
      > > > > From: "B. Degnan" <billdeg@>
      > > > > Sent: Monday, June 17, 2013 8:59 AM
      > > > > To: midatlanticretro@yahoogroups.com
      > > > > Subject: re: [midatlanticretro] Re: Ok historians. When was the
      > intel
      > > > hex format introduced...
      > > > >
      > > > > Other than yours, any 8008 code I have ever seen pre 1976 has been in
      >
      > > > > octal, but not sure what the papertape format would be, but Intel's
      > > > > "official" format was actually IBM 029 punched cards, and
      > alternatively
      > > > > that simple papertape format with the BnnnnnnnnFBnnnnnnnnF, etc
      > format.
      > > > > bd
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > > I should clarify - The Intel manual's format in 1975, for ordering ROMs
      > was
      > > > 029 punched card format. The alternative is a papertape with the
      > > > BnnnnnnnnFBnnnnnnnnF format, containing the entire 1024 bytes in total
      > for
      > > > the ePROM.
      > > >
      > > > bd
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >

      I was thinking it might be tied to the Intellec development also.
      I sure wish Gary Kildall was still around; I'm sure he could have told us, as I just read he was working with Intel as they developed
      the 4004 on forward.
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