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"Miniswift" suggestion

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  • John W Reynoldson
    For Mark, Looking at the pic of your Miniswift project I hope you will not mind if I make a couple of suggestions. It looks like the concept is one I also
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 9, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      For Mark,
      Looking at the pic of your Miniswift project I hope you will not mind
      if I make a couple of suggestions.

      It looks like the concept is one I also tossed around myself some time
      ago - basically a supine harness with the trike structure as an
      "add-on". (ie: the pilot isn't actually putting much load on the
      structure of the trike) Correct me if I'm wrong.

      On of the pains in the arse in nanolight trikes for me has always been
      the lack of available fore-aft control bar movement. Even in the best
      circumstances, in supine you only have one arm length (plus nay
      distance you can lean forward) available, compared with prone with up
      to twice this. This isn't a problem for just cruising around under
      power at or near trim most of the time like most microlights do, but
      when I'm flying a soaring nanolight, there are times when I really
      wish I had that extra pitch authority in rowdy air or when trying to
      penetrate upwind.

      The Miniswift setup appears to have even less pitch movement than most
      thanks to the harness suspension strap position. It might be worth
      taking a look at some of the supine harnesses available in the 1970's
      for inspiration, particularly the Sunbird from the USA. This harness
      passes the risers through a semicircular tube at about bar level. (the
      tube as constrained to lay fore and aft. This created a "hollow" in
      the riser at the point where the control bar came toward the chest an
      allowed full movement from arm-extended to "bar-to-gut".

      The only other concern I have is for your spine safety - I sincerely
      hope you have a metal or kevlar plate with some crushable foam under
      your backside in the harness!

      John Reynoldson
      Australia
    • Mark Phillips
      Hello John, yes thanks for any feedback as this is why we are all here... and glad for some words from down-under . You sit supine on a seat which has cables
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 10, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        Hello John,
        yes thanks for any feedback as this is why we are all here... and glad for some words from 'down-under'.
        You sit supine on a seat which has cables from your centre of mass up to the wingkeel hangpoint... I guestimate less than half the pilot's weight is on the trike frame itself.

        Arms will limit pitch authority, which may present problems in rowdy air, but as for smooth air I was of the opinion that 14hp will not give much speed range to be exploited so vast bar monement is less important.
        Pitch down authority will not be great but the striker wing has a wide nose angle and was not known for pitching up badly in gusts so I hope this will mitigate against my limited 'pull-in' John.
        I was more concerned about getting good push forward in the landing flare from a supine position... think I will have to do a course of sit-ups to be ready for fully flared landings.

        There is as I say no harness as such John, you just sit on a seat which is filled with crushable foam, and under your hips the two 'butt wires' that suspend your mass attach to a plywood plate. I suppose spine wise you have some protection with regard to compression from the base tube running along each side of your body.
        Your bum is quite close to the ground but if you are landing on unknown rough ground it is very easy to raise it before touchdown... and the nosewheel will hit lumps first and bounce the whole thing back up a bit, but certainly this is not a trike for unknown fields in the outback.
        The butt wires can be adjusted to raise the seat height but the control bar limits how high; but since the photo you have seen was taken last week I have made a curved control bar so paunch clearance is a little better now and you could raise the seat for rough surfaces.

        Thanks for the thoughts John,
        Mark Phillips............




        John W Reynoldson <microsoar@...> wrote:
        For Mark,
        Looking at the pic of your Miniswift project I hope you will not mind
        if I make a couple of suggestions.

        It looks like the concept is one I also tossed around myself some time
        ago - basically a supine harness with the trike structure as an
        "add-on". (ie: the pilot isn't actually putting much load on the
        structure of the trike) Correct me if I'm wrong.

        On of the pains in the arse in nanolight trikes for me has always been
        the lack of available fore-aft control bar movement. Even in the best
        circumstances, in supine you only have one arm length (plus nay
        distance you can lean forward) available, compared with prone with up
        to twice this. This isn't a problem for just cruising around under
        power at or near trim most of the time like most microlights do, but
        when I'm flying a soaring nanolight, there are times when I really
        wish I had that extra pitch authority in rowdy air or when trying to
        penetrate upwind.

        The Miniswift setup appears to have even less pitch movement than most
        thanks to the harness suspension strap position. It might be worth
        taking a look at some of the supine harnesses available in the 1970's
        for inspiration, particularly the Sunbird from the USA. This harness
        passes the risers through a semicircular tube at about bar level. (the
        tube as constrained to lay fore and aft. This created a "hollow" in
        the riser at the point where the control bar came toward the chest an
        allowed full movement from arm-extended to "bar-to-gut".

        The only other concern I have is for your spine safety - I sincerely
        hope you have a metal or kevlar plate with some crushable foam under
        your backside in the harness!

        John Reynoldson
        Australia





        Microlights is a discussion forum. Comments made are the views of the individual member and do not reflect the views of the group as a whole or the BMAA. No responsibility will be accepted by the BMAA for comments made on this group. Thank you for not advertising.

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      • John W Reynoldson
        I highly recommend that you use a speed bar rather than a straight basetube to get a little more pull-in. It s not gusts that are the problem, it s thermals.
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 10, 2006
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          I highly recommend that you use a "speed bar" rather than a straight
          basetube to get a little more pull-in. It's not gusts that are the
          problem, it's thermals.

          As per your description I agree - if you fly it in smooth air and near
          trim most of the time it should be OK.

          John.

          --- In microlights@yahoogroups.com, Mark Phillips <mdphillips1956@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Hello John,
          > yes thanks for any feedback as this is why we are all here... and
          glad for some words from 'down-under'.
          > You sit supine on a seat which has cables from your centre of mass
          up to the wingkeel hangpoint... I guestimate less than half the
          pilot's weight is on the trike frame itself.
          >
          > Arms will limit pitch authority, which may present problems in
          rowdy air, but as for smooth air I was of the opinion that 14hp will
          not give much speed range to be exploited so vast bar monement is less
          important.
          > Pitch down authority will not be great but the striker wing has a
          wide nose angle and was not known for pitching up badly in gusts so I
          hope this will mitigate against my limited 'pull-in' John.
          > I was more concerned about getting good push forward in the
          landing flare from a supine position... think I will have to do a
          course of sit-ups to be ready for fully flared landings.
          >
          > There is as I say no harness as such John, you just sit on a seat
          which is filled with crushable foam, and under your hips the two 'butt
          wires' that suspend your mass attach to a plywood plate. I suppose
          spine wise you have some protection with regard to compression from
          the base tube running along each side of your body.
          > Your bum is quite close to the ground but if you are landing on
          unknown rough ground it is very easy to raise it before touchdown...
          and the nosewheel will hit lumps first and bounce the whole thing back
          up a bit, but certainly this is not a trike for unknown fields in the
          outback.
          > The butt wires can be adjusted to raise the seat height but the
          control bar limits how high; but since the photo you have seen was
          taken last week I have made a curved control bar so paunch clearance
          is a little better now and you could raise the seat for rough surfaces.
          >
          > Thanks for the thoughts John,
          > Mark Phillips............
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > John W Reynoldson <microsoar@...> wrote:
          > For Mark,
          > Looking at the pic of your Miniswift project I hope you will not mind
          > if I make a couple of suggestions.
          >
          > It looks like the concept is one I also tossed around myself some time
          > ago - basically a supine harness with the trike structure as an
          > "add-on". (ie: the pilot isn't actually putting much load on the
          > structure of the trike) Correct me if I'm wrong.
          >
          > On of the pains in the arse in nanolight trikes for me has always been
          > the lack of available fore-aft control bar movement. Even in the best
          > circumstances, in supine you only have one arm length (plus nay
          > distance you can lean forward) available, compared with prone with up
          > to twice this. This isn't a problem for just cruising around under
          > power at or near trim most of the time like most microlights do, but
          > when I'm flying a soaring nanolight, there are times when I really
          > wish I had that extra pitch authority in rowdy air or when trying to
          > penetrate upwind.
          >
          > The Miniswift setup appears to have even less pitch movement than most
          > thanks to the harness suspension strap position. It might be worth
          > taking a look at some of the supine harnesses available in the 1970's
          > for inspiration, particularly the Sunbird from the USA. This harness
          > passes the risers through a semicircular tube at about bar level. (the
          > tube as constrained to lay fore and aft. This created a "hollow" in
          > the riser at the point where the control bar came toward the chest an
          > allowed full movement from arm-extended to "bar-to-gut".
          >
          > The only other concern I have is for your spine safety - I sincerely
          > hope you have a metal or kevlar plate with some crushable foam under
          > your backside in the harness!
          >
          > John Reynoldson
          > Australia
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Microlights is a discussion forum. Comments made are the views of
          the individual member and do not reflect the views of the group as a
          whole or the BMAA. No responsibility will be accepted by the BMAA for
          comments made on this group. Thank you for not advertising.
          >
          > Community email addresses:
          >
          > Unsubscribe: microlights-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > List owner : microlights-owner@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > To help you stay safe and secure online, we've developed the all new
          Yahoo! Security Centre.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Mark Phillips
          Hello John... I was thinking of the gusts you get around thermals so we are not really so far apart on that. What I am trying to create is an old man s flying
          Message 4 of 6 , Mar 10, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            Hello John... I was thinking of the gusts you get around thermals so we are not really so far apart on that.
            What I am trying to create is an old man's flying machine, or a slightly infirm middle aged guy's machine so it is a calm evening thing more than a thermalling up to cloud base in the heat of the day machine.
            I am trying to make the trike and wing act as a whole and the one impart energy onto the other, with twin parallelograming hangpoints and a semi resistive roll system.
            Mark P...............

            ps. why are you up in the middle of the Ozzy night John?

            John W Reynoldson <raptordesigns@...> wrote:
            I highly recommend that you use a "speed bar" rather than a straight
            basetube to get a little more pull-in. It's not gusts that are the
            problem, it's thermals.

            As per your description I agree - if you fly it in smooth air and near
            trim most of the time it should be OK.

            John.

            --- In microlights@yahoogroups.com, Mark Phillips
            wrote:
            >
            > Hello John,
            > yes thanks for any feedback as this is why we are all here... and
            glad for some words from 'down-under'.
            > You sit supine on a seat which has cables from your centre of mass
            up to the wingkeel hangpoint... I guestimate less than half the
            pilot's weight is on the trike frame itself.
            >
            > Arms will limit pitch authority, which may present problems in
            rowdy air, but as for smooth air I was of the opinion that 14hp will
            not give much speed range to be exploited so vast bar monement is less
            important.
            > Pitch down authority will not be great but the striker wing has a
            wide nose angle and was not known for pitching up badly in gusts so I
            hope this will mitigate against my limited 'pull-in' John.
            > I was more concerned about getting good push forward in the
            landing flare from a supine position... think I will have to do a
            course of sit-ups to be ready for fully flared landings.
            >
            > There is as I say no harness as such John, you just sit on a seat
            which is filled with crushable foam, and under your hips the two 'butt
            wires' that suspend your mass attach to a plywood plate. I suppose
            spine wise you have some protection with regard to compression from
            the base tube running along each side of your body.
            > Your bum is quite close to the ground but if you are landing on
            unknown rough ground it is very easy to raise it before touchdown...
            and the nosewheel will hit lumps first and bounce the whole thing back
            up a bit, but certainly this is not a trike for unknown fields in the
            outback.
            > The butt wires can be adjusted to raise the seat height but the
            control bar limits how high; but since the photo you have seen was
            taken last week I have made a curved control bar so paunch clearance
            is a little better now and you could raise the seat for rough surfaces.
            >
            > Thanks for the thoughts John,
            > Mark Phillips............
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > John W Reynoldson wrote:
            > For Mark,
            > Looking at the pic of your Miniswift project I hope you will not mind
            > if I make a couple of suggestions.
            >
            > It looks like the concept is one I also tossed around myself some time
            > ago - basically a supine harness with the trike structure as an
            > "add-on". (ie: the pilot isn't actually putting much load on the
            > structure of the trike) Correct me if I'm wrong.
            >
            > On of the pains in the arse in nanolight trikes for me has always been
            > the lack of available fore-aft control bar movement. Even in the best
            > circumstances, in supine you only have one arm length (plus nay
            > distance you can lean forward) available, compared with prone with up
            > to twice this. This isn't a problem for just cruising around under
            > power at or near trim most of the time like most microlights do, but
            > when I'm flying a soaring nanolight, there are times when I really
            > wish I had that extra pitch authority in rowdy air or when trying to
            > penetrate upwind.
            >
            > The Miniswift setup appears to have even less pitch movement than most
            > thanks to the harness suspension strap position. It might be worth
            > taking a look at some of the supine harnesses available in the 1970's
            > for inspiration, particularly the Sunbird from the USA. This harness
            > passes the risers through a semicircular tube at about bar level. (the
            > tube as constrained to lay fore and aft. This created a "hollow" in
            > the riser at the point where the control bar came toward the chest an
            > allowed full movement from arm-extended to "bar-to-gut".
            >
            > The only other concern I have is for your spine safety - I sincerely
            > hope you have a metal or kevlar plate with some crushable foam under
            > your backside in the harness!
            >
            > John Reynoldson
            > Australia
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Microlights is a discussion forum. Comments made are the views of
            the individual member and do not reflect the views of the group as a
            whole or the BMAA. No responsibility will be accepted by the BMAA for
            comments made on this group. Thank you for not advertising.
            >
            > Community email addresses:
            >
            > Unsubscribe: microlights-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > List owner : microlights-owner@yahoogroups.com
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ---------------------------------
            > To help you stay safe and secure online, we've developed the all new
            Yahoo! Security Centre.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >






            Microlights is a discussion forum. Comments made are the views of the individual member and do not reflect the views of the group as a whole or the BMAA. No responsibility will be accepted by the BMAA for comments made on this group. Thank you for not advertising.

            Community email addresses:

            Unsubscribe: microlights-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            List owner : microlights-owner@yahoogroups.com


            Yahoo! Groups Links









            ---------------------------------
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • John W Reynoldson
            Ahh... while my efforts have been in the other direction of making the trike system as much like the free-flying experience as possible to make it eminently
            Message 5 of 6 , Mar 10, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Ahh... while my efforts have been in the other direction of making the
              trike system as much like the free-flying experience as possible to
              make it eminently thermalable, with a full universal joint to
              duplicate the ability of the hang glider pilot to use the independent
              yaw of the payload in order to maximise the efficiency of turns! :-)

              I'm up (and going to bed now) as I had to pick up my 18yr old daughter
              from a social engagement.

              cheers
              John.

              --- In microlights@yahoogroups.com, Mark Phillips <mdphillips1956@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > Hello John... I was thinking of the gusts you get around thermals so
              we are not really so far apart on that.
              > What I am trying to create is an old man's flying machine, or a
              slightly infirm middle aged guy's machine so it is a calm evening
              thing more than a thermalling up to cloud base in the heat of the day
              machine.
              > I am trying to make the trike and wing act as a whole and the one
              impart energy onto the other, with twin parallelograming hangpoints
              and a semi resistive roll system.
              > Mark P...............
              >
              > ps. why are you up in the middle of the Ozzy night John?
              >
              > John W Reynoldson <raptordesigns@...> wrote:
              > I highly recommend that you use a "speed bar" rather than a straight
              > basetube to get a little more pull-in. It's not gusts that are the
              > problem, it's thermals.
              >
              > As per your description I agree - if you fly it in smooth air and near
              > trim most of the time it should be OK.
              >
              > John.
              >
              > --- In microlights@yahoogroups.com, Mark Phillips
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > Hello John,
              > > yes thanks for any feedback as this is why we are all here... and
              > glad for some words from 'down-under'.
              > > You sit supine on a seat which has cables from your centre of mass
              > up to the wingkeel hangpoint... I guestimate less than half the
              > pilot's weight is on the trike frame itself.
              > >
              > > Arms will limit pitch authority, which may present problems in
              > rowdy air, but as for smooth air I was of the opinion that 14hp will
              > not give much speed range to be exploited so vast bar monement is less
              > important.
              > > Pitch down authority will not be great but the striker wing has a
              > wide nose angle and was not known for pitching up badly in gusts so I
              > hope this will mitigate against my limited 'pull-in' John.
              > > I was more concerned about getting good push forward in the
              > landing flare from a supine position... think I will have to do a
              > course of sit-ups to be ready for fully flared landings.
              > >
              > > There is as I say no harness as such John, you just sit on a seat
              > which is filled with crushable foam, and under your hips the two 'butt
              > wires' that suspend your mass attach to a plywood plate. I suppose
              > spine wise you have some protection with regard to compression from
              > the base tube running along each side of your body.
              > > Your bum is quite close to the ground but if you are landing on
              > unknown rough ground it is very easy to raise it before touchdown...
              > and the nosewheel will hit lumps first and bounce the whole thing back
              > up a bit, but certainly this is not a trike for unknown fields in the
              > outback.
              > > The butt wires can be adjusted to raise the seat height but the
              > control bar limits how high; but since the photo you have seen was
              > taken last week I have made a curved control bar so paunch clearance
              > is a little better now and you could raise the seat for rough surfaces.
              > >
              > > Thanks for the thoughts John,
              > > Mark Phillips............
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > John W Reynoldson wrote:
              > > For Mark,
              > > Looking at the pic of your Miniswift project I hope you will not mind
              > > if I make a couple of suggestions.
              > >
              > > It looks like the concept is one I also tossed around myself some time
              > > ago - basically a supine harness with the trike structure as an
              > > "add-on". (ie: the pilot isn't actually putting much load on the
              > > structure of the trike) Correct me if I'm wrong.
              > >
              > > On of the pains in the arse in nanolight trikes for me has always been
              > > the lack of available fore-aft control bar movement. Even in the best
              > > circumstances, in supine you only have one arm length (plus nay
              > > distance you can lean forward) available, compared with prone with up
              > > to twice this. This isn't a problem for just cruising around under
              > > power at or near trim most of the time like most microlights do, but
              > > when I'm flying a soaring nanolight, there are times when I really
              > > wish I had that extra pitch authority in rowdy air or when trying to
              > > penetrate upwind.
              > >
              > > The Miniswift setup appears to have even less pitch movement than most
              > > thanks to the harness suspension strap position. It might be worth
              > > taking a look at some of the supine harnesses available in the 1970's
              > > for inspiration, particularly the Sunbird from the USA. This harness
              > > passes the risers through a semicircular tube at about bar level. (the
              > > tube as constrained to lay fore and aft. This created a "hollow" in
              > > the riser at the point where the control bar came toward the chest an
              > > allowed full movement from arm-extended to "bar-to-gut".
              > >
              > > The only other concern I have is for your spine safety - I sincerely
              > > hope you have a metal or kevlar plate with some crushable foam under
              > > your backside in the harness!
              > >
              > > John Reynoldson
              > > Australia
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Microlights is a discussion forum. Comments made are the views of
              > the individual member and do not reflect the views of the group as a
              > whole or the BMAA. No responsibility will be accepted by the BMAA for
              > comments made on this group. Thank you for not advertising.
              > >
              > > Community email addresses:
              > >
              > > Unsubscribe: microlights-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > > List owner : microlights-owner@yahoogroups.com
              > >
              > >
              > > Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > ---------------------------------
              > > To help you stay safe and secure online, we've developed the all new
              > Yahoo! Security Centre.
              > >
              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Microlights is a discussion forum. Comments made are the views of
              the individual member and do not reflect the views of the group as a
              whole or the BMAA. No responsibility will be accepted by the BMAA for
              comments made on this group. Thank you for not advertising.
              >
              > Community email addresses:
              >
              > Unsubscribe: microlights-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              > List owner : microlights-owner@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ---------------------------------
              > Yahoo! Messenger NEW - crystal clear PC to PC calling worldwide
              with voicemail
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
            • Mark Phillips
              Hello John, and I forgot to say that the control bar isn t straight it curves up and over my supine paunch! John W Reynoldson
              Message 6 of 6 , Mar 10, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                Hello John, and I forgot to say that the control bar isn't straight it curves up and over my supine paunch!

                John W Reynoldson <raptordesigns@...> wrote: Ahh... while my efforts have been in the other direction of making the
                trike system as much like the free-flying experience as possible to
                make it eminently thermalable, with a full universal joint to
                duplicate the ability of the hang glider pilot to use the independent
                yaw of the payload in order to maximise the efficiency of turns! :-)

                I'm up (and going to bed now) as I had to pick up my 18yr old daughter
                from a social engagement.

                cheers
                John.

                --- In microlights@yahoogroups.com, Mark Phillips
                wrote:
                >
                > Hello John... I was thinking of the gusts you get around thermals so
                we are not really so far apart on that.
                > What I am trying to create is an old man's flying machine, or a
                slightly infirm middle aged guy's machine so it is a calm evening
                thing more than a thermalling up to cloud base in the heat of the day
                machine.
                > I am trying to make the trike and wing act as a whole and the one
                impart energy onto the other, with twin parallelograming hangpoints
                and a semi resistive roll system.
                > Mark P...............
                >
                > ps. why are you up in the middle of the Ozzy night John?
                >
                > John W Reynoldson wrote:
                > I highly recommend that you use a "speed bar" rather than a straight
                > basetube to get a little more pull-in. It's not gusts that are the
                > problem, it's thermals.
                >
                > As per your description I agree - if you fly it in smooth air and near
                > trim most of the time it should be OK.
                >
                > John.
                >
                > --- In microlights@yahoogroups.com, Mark Phillips
                > wrote:
                > >
                > > Hello John,
                > > yes thanks for any feedback as this is why we are all here... and
                > glad for some words from 'down-under'.
                > > You sit supine on a seat which has cables from your centre of mass
                > up to the wingkeel hangpoint... I guestimate less than half the
                > pilot's weight is on the trike frame itself.
                > >
                > > Arms will limit pitch authority, which may present problems in
                > rowdy air, but as for smooth air I was of the opinion that 14hp will
                > not give much speed range to be exploited so vast bar monement is less
                > important.
                > > Pitch down authority will not be great but the striker wing has a
                > wide nose angle and was not known for pitching up badly in gusts so I
                > hope this will mitigate against my limited 'pull-in' John.
                > > I was more concerned about getting good push forward in the
                > landing flare from a supine position... think I will have to do a
                > course of sit-ups to be ready for fully flared landings.
                > >
                > > There is as I say no harness as such John, you just sit on a seat
                > which is filled with crushable foam, and under your hips the two 'butt
                > wires' that suspend your mass attach to a plywood plate. I suppose
                > spine wise you have some protection with regard to compression from
                > the base tube running along each side of your body.
                > > Your bum is quite close to the ground but if you are landing on
                > unknown rough ground it is very easy to raise it before touchdown...
                > and the nosewheel will hit lumps first and bounce the whole thing back
                > up a bit, but certainly this is not a trike for unknown fields in the
                > outback.
                > > The butt wires can be adjusted to raise the seat height but the
                > control bar limits how high; but since the photo you have seen was
                > taken last week I have made a curved control bar so paunch clearance
                > is a little better now and you could raise the seat for rough surfaces.
                > >
                > > Thanks for the thoughts John,
                > > Mark Phillips............
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > John W Reynoldson wrote:
                > > For Mark,
                > > Looking at the pic of your Miniswift project I hope you will not mind
                > > if I make a couple of suggestions.
                > >
                > > It looks like the concept is one I also tossed around myself some time
                > > ago - basically a supine harness with the trike structure as an
                > > "add-on". (ie: the pilot isn't actually putting much load on the
                > > structure of the trike) Correct me if I'm wrong.
                > >
                > > On of the pains in the arse in nanolight trikes for me has always been
                > > the lack of available fore-aft control bar movement. Even in the best
                > > circumstances, in supine you only have one arm length (plus nay
                > > distance you can lean forward) available, compared with prone with up
                > > to twice this. This isn't a problem for just cruising around under
                > > power at or near trim most of the time like most microlights do, but
                > > when I'm flying a soaring nanolight, there are times when I really
                > > wish I had that extra pitch authority in rowdy air or when trying to
                > > penetrate upwind.
                > >
                > > The Miniswift setup appears to have even less pitch movement than most
                > > thanks to the harness suspension strap position. It might be worth
                > > taking a look at some of the supine harnesses available in the 1970's
                > > for inspiration, particularly the Sunbird from the USA. This harness
                > > passes the risers through a semicircular tube at about bar level. (the
                > > tube as constrained to lay fore and aft. This created a "hollow" in
                > > the riser at the point where the control bar came toward the chest an
                > > allowed full movement from arm-extended to "bar-to-gut".
                > >
                > > The only other concern I have is for your spine safety - I sincerely
                > > hope you have a metal or kevlar plate with some crushable foam under
                > > your backside in the harness!
                > >
                > > John Reynoldson
                > > Australia
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
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