Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

[microhydro] Re: Streambed Intake

Expand Messages
  • Wim Klunne
    Fred Morgan wrote:RON ... Information about this and other books can be found at http://www.itc.nl/~klunne/hydro/literature.html including a link to Amazon and
    Message 1 of 8 , Dec 1, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Fred Morgan wrote:RON

      > I to am interested in seeing this publication (Micro-Hydropower Sourcebook)
      >
      > I went to http://www.nreca.org/ and searched for the sourcebook by name,
      > Micro -hydro and Micro al three searched returned 0 results.
      >
      > If you get the time would you be so kind as to listing the exact location.
      >
      > Thank You for your time
      >
      > Fred
      >

      Information about this and other books can be found at
      http://www.itc.nl/~klunne/hydro/literature.html including a link to
      Amazon and NRECA (third title in the list)


      Wim Klunne

      ==============================================================
      ir W.E. Klunne (biomass and rural energy modelling specialist)
      ITC / Forest Science Division (room 4-011)
      PO Box 6, 7500 AA Enschede, the Netherlands

      phone: +31 53 4874 218 (direct)
      +31 53 4874 240 (secretary)
      fax: +31 53 4874 379
      e-mail: klunne@...

      INTERNET
      forest science division http://www.itc.nl/forestry/
      personal pages http://www.itc.nl/~klunne/
      ==============================================================
    • Joseph Hartvigsen
      I didn t want to disturb the stream bed at my site, so my inlet isn t really in the stream bed but it is of this type. The inlet end of our trench was dug
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 1, 1999
      • 0 Attachment
        I didn't want to disturb the stream bed at my site, so my inlet
        isn't really in the stream bed but it is of this type. The inlet
        end of our trench was dug parallel, about 2 feet offset from the
        stream and about 4 feet deeper than the stream bed. The first
        lenght of pipe was about 2x the diameter of the main line and
        capped at one end. It had hundreds of holes, smaller than the
        turbine nozzle diameter ideally, drilled in it. The number of holes
        was such that the total hole area is larger than the pipe cross
        sectional area. The pipe was placed on gravel and covered by
        hand with rocks. It has silted in quite a bit but still works
        well. It is important to have a drain valve at the bottom to
        really be able to flush the pipe periodically. Once the entire
        pipe was installed and burried, and thrust block poured at the
        bottom end we put water on the intake. All it took was a few
        shovels (hand and foot operated) to open a channel to the capped
        end, and back to the main streambed at the other end of the 20'
        intake. Some of the water stays in the natural channel. Much
        of the water flows over the inlet then back to the natural channel.
        It is not obvious that there is anything there at all.

        Joe

        "ron macleod" <microhydr-@...> wrote:
        original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/microhydro/?start=718
        > Richard -
        > One of the best sources for intake design - for a site like yours
        is
        > "Micro-Hydropower Sourcebook" by Allen Inverson. It's available from
        > the NRECA in washington - check for web site. Allen shows a streambed
        > intake design.
        > best - Ron
        >
      • Richard Raucina
        In 5 minutes this group has given me more practical information than I had found in 5 years of part time searching by foot. To think I resisted the WWW for
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 1, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          In 5 minutes this group has given me more practical information than I had
          found in 5 years of part time searching by foot. To think I resisted the WWW
          for years... Thank you all.

          I installed a streambed pick up of this sort as a irrigation supply point a
          few years ago. It was a heavy plastic drum, slotted by saw, buried on
          bedrock 5 ' deeper than the average streambed. The area is massive bedrock
          with gravel filled pockets. The location was directly in the streambed
          center. Filled over with run of the river rock and sand. Worked fine until
          the big storm when you could feel the boulders rolling downstream. When I
          searched for this chamber by backhoe, it was nowhere to be found. It didnt
          come up, so I assume the entire streambed is in motion downhill. My best
          pickup site is at an area of polished massive bedrock. I envisioned a "dam"
          about 16" in height with the perf pipe tucked in behind it. The river would
          keep it covered with gravel without assistance. Your idea of moving the
          pick up bed to one side is less intrusive, and now I need to go poke a few
          holes in the ground and see if the rock drops off somewhere. Is your stream
          subject to massive swings in flow? Mine runs from a trickle to a 60' wide
          torrent, and any side channel would have to resist that erosion potential.

          You mention a drain valve. I can't picture how this would work or how it is
          needed if the slots in the pipe are small enough. Can you elaborate?

          Raucina@...



          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Joseph Hartvigsen <jjh@...>
          To: <microhydro@...>
          Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 1999 9:32 AM
          Subject: [microhydro] Re: Streambed Intake


          > I didn't want to disturb the stream bed at my site, so my inlet
          > isn't really in the stream bed but it is of this type. The inlet
          > end of our trench was dug parallel, about 2 feet offset from the
          > stream and about 4 feet deeper than the stream bed. The first
          > lenght of pipe was about 2x the diameter of the main line and
          > capped at one end. It had hundreds of holes, smaller than the
          > turbine nozzle diameter ideally, drilled in it. The number of holes
          > was such that the total hole area is larger than the pipe cross
          > sectional area. The pipe was placed on gravel and covered by
          > hand with rocks. It has silted in quite a bit but still works
          > well. It is important to have a drain valve at the bottom to
          > really be able to flush the pipe periodically. Once the entire
          > pipe was installed and burried, and thrust block poured at the
          > bottom end we put water on the intake. All it took was a few
          > shovels (hand and foot operated) to open a channel to the capped
          > end, and back to the main streambed at the other end of the 20'
          > intake. Some of the water stays in the natural channel. Much
          > of the water flows over the inlet then back to the natural channel.
          > It is not obvious that there is anything there at all.
          >
          > Joe
          >
          > "ron macleod" <microhydr-@...> wrote:
          > original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/microhydro/?start=718
          > > Richard -
          > > One of the best sources for intake design - for a site like yours
          > is
          > > "Micro-Hydropower Sourcebook" by Allen Inverson. It's available from
          > > the NRECA in washington - check for web site. Allen shows a streambed
          > > intake design.
          > > best - Ron
          > >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > More information on micro hydropower at http://start.at/microhydro
          > Microhydro eGroup page at http://www.itc.nl/~klunne/hydro/egroup
          > To unsubscribe: send blanco message to microhydro-unsubscribe@...
          >
          > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          > -- Talk to your group with your own voice!
          > -- http://www.egroups.com/VoiceChatPage?listName=microhydro&m=1
          >
          >
          >
        • Joseph Hartvigsen
          richard raucina wrote: original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/microhydro/?start=730 ... I had ... the WWW ... Yes, thanks
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 1, 1999
          • 0 Attachment
            "richard raucina" <raucin-@...> wrote:
            original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/microhydro/?start=730
            > In 5 minutes this group has given me more practical information than
            I had
            > found in 5 years of part time searching by foot. To think I resisted
            the WWW
            > for years... Thank you all.

            Yes, thanks especially to Wim for starting this group and announcing it
            in the newsgroups. This is much more focused than the newsgroups and
            better protected from the spammers address collection efforts.

            >
            > I installed a streambed pick up of this sort as a irrigation supply
            point a
            > few years ago. It was a heavy plastic drum, slotted by saw, buried on
            > bedrock 5 ' deeper than the average streambed. The area is massive
            bedrock
            > with gravel filled pockets. The location was directly in the streambed
            > center. Filled over with run of the river rock and sand. Worked fine
            until
            > the big storm when you could feel the boulders rolling downstream.
            When I
            > searched for this chamber by backhoe, it was nowhere to be found. It
            didnt
            > come up, so I assume the entire streambed is in motion downhill. My
            best
            > pickup site is at an area of polished massive bedrock. I envisioned
            a "dam"
            > about 16" in height with the perf pipe tucked in behind it. The river
            would
            > keep it covered with gravel without assistance. Your idea of moving
            the
            > pick up bed to one side is less intrusive, and now I need to go poke
            a few
            > holes in the ground and see if the rock drops off somewhere. Is your
            stream
            > subject to massive swings in flow? Mine runs from a trickle to a 60'
            wide
            > torrent, and any side channel would have to resist that erosion
            potential.

            My stream is rather steady as it is mainly fed by a spring. In the
            spring snow melt, or after a thunder storm it can get up to several cfs.
            There are seasonal variations as well of course, but most of the time
            it is ~0.3-3 cfs. There are a lot of aspen and chokecherry type trees
            along the stream. There is not much of an embankment (a few inches) in
            the area where the intake was installed. In recent years beavers have
            taken up residence a few hundred yards up stream. I'm not sure if this
            has increased or decreased the amount of debris carried by the stream.
            The entire stream disappears about 1-1/2 miles down from the powerhouse
            where the ground is quite gravelly, except in high water.

            >
            > You mention a drain valve. I can't picture how this would work or
            how it is
            > needed if the slots in the pipe are small enough. Can you elaborate?

            The drain referred to is at the bottom end of the pipe. I have ~1/4-1/3
            mile of pipe, mostly 6" to gain about 92' of head. I only run about
            100gpm so sediments drop out in the pipe. We have a 1-1/2" gate valve
            at the bottom. When we open that, all of the water flowing over the
            intake pipe is drawn into the pipe. The large diameter intake pipe
            at this point is rather empty and the water pouring in through the holes
            washes accumulated small debris with it. This tends to clear out the
            intake
            area as well as the pipe.

            You mention bedrock here. Is the high point for your contemplated
            siphon also over bedrock, or is it possible to cut a trench through
            at that point?

            Joe
            >
            > Raucina@...
            >
            >
            >
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: Joseph Hartvigsen <jjh@...>
            > To: <microhydro@...>
            > Sent: Wednesday, December 01, 1999 9:32 AM
            > Subject: [microhydro] Re: Streambed Intake
            >
            >
            > > I didn't want to disturb the stream bed at my site, so my inlet
            > > isn't really in the stream bed but it is of this type. The inlet
            > > end of our trench was dug parallel, about 2 feet offset from the
            > > stream and about 4 feet deeper than the stream bed. The first
            > > lenght of pipe was about 2x the diameter of the main line and
            > > capped at one end. It had hundreds of holes, smaller than the
            > > turbine nozzle diameter ideally, drilled in it. The number of holes
            > > was such that the total hole area is larger than the pipe cross
            > > sectional area. The pipe was placed on gravel and covered by
            > > hand with rocks. It has silted in quite a bit but still works
            > > well. It is important to have a drain valve at the bottom to
            > > really be able to flush the pipe periodically. Once the entire
            > > pipe was installed and burried, and thrust block poured at the
            > > bottom end we put water on the intake. All it took was a few
            > > shovels (hand and foot operated) to open a channel to the capped
            > > end, and back to the main streambed at the other end of the 20'
            > > intake. Some of the water stays in the natural channel. Much
            > > of the water flows over the inlet then back to the natural channel.
            > > It is not obvious that there is anything there at all.
            > >
            > > Joe
            > >
            > > "ron macleod" <microhydr-@...> wrote:
            > > original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/microhydro/?start=718
            > > > Richard -
            > > > One of the best sources for intake design - for a site like
            yours
            > > is
            > > > "Micro-Hydropower Sourcebook" by Allen Inverson. It's available
            from
            > > > the NRECA in washington - check for web site. Allen shows a
            streambed
            > > > intake design.
            > > > best - Ron
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > -------------------------------------------------------------------
            -----
            > > More information on micro hydropower at http://start.at/microhydro
            > > Microhydro eGroup page at http://www.itc.nl/~klunne/hydro/egroup
            > > To unsubscribe: send blanco message to microhydro-unsubscribe@eGrou
            ps.com
            > >
          • Phillip C Nisbet
            Joe, Just an alternative, but take a look at what my company has been working on for avoiding stream bed alterations. http://balatonpower.com Floaters can work
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 7, 1999
            • 0 Attachment
              Joe,

              Just an alternative, but take a look at what my company has been working on
              for avoiding stream bed alterations.

              http://balatonpower.com

              Floaters can work and reduce the use of barbs and other channel modifications.

              At 09:32 AM 12/1/99 -0800, you wrote:
              >I didn't want to disturb the stream bed at my site, so my inlet
              >isn't really in the stream bed but it is of this type. The inlet
              >end of our trench was dug parallel, about 2 feet offset from the
              >stream and about 4 feet deeper than the stream bed. The first
              >lenght of pipe was about 2x the diameter of the main line and
              >capped at one end. It had hundreds of holes, smaller than the
              >turbine nozzle diameter ideally, drilled in it. The number of holes
              >was such that the total hole area is larger than the pipe cross
              >sectional area. The pipe was placed on gravel and covered by
              >hand with rocks. It has silted in quite a bit but still works
              >well. It is important to have a drain valve at the bottom to
              >really be able to flush the pipe periodically. Once the entire
              >pipe was installed and burried, and thrust block poured at the
              >bottom end we put water on the intake. All it took was a few
              >shovels (hand and foot operated) to open a channel to the capped
              >end, and back to the main streambed at the other end of the 20'
              >intake. Some of the water stays in the natural channel. Much
              >of the water flows over the inlet then back to the natural channel.
              >It is not obvious that there is anything there at all.
              >
              > Joe
              >
              >"ron macleod" <microhydr-@...> wrote:
              >original article:http://www.egroups.com/group/microhydro/?start=718
              >> Richard -
              >> One of the best sources for intake design - for a site like yours
              >is
              >> "Micro-Hydropower Sourcebook" by Allen Inverson. It's available from
              >> the NRECA in washington - check for web site. Allen shows a streambed
              >> intake design.
              >> best - Ron
              >>
              >
              >
              >------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >More information on micro hydropower at http://start.at/microhydro
              >Microhydro eGroup page at http://www.itc.nl/~klunne/hydro/egroup
              >To unsubscribe: send blanco message to microhydro-unsubscribe@...
              >
              >------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >-- Talk to your group with your own voice!
              >-- http://www.egroups.com/VoiceChatPage?listName=microhydro&m=1
              >
              >
              >
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.