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Re: [microhydro] lowtech mag - floating water mills and factories of days gone by

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  • Jerry Scovel
    Bill, We are looking in to the possibility of making some of these mills on the Mississippi River. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Pioneeradventure/ Jerry. ...
    Message 1 of 53 , Feb 1, 2011
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      Bill,

      We are looking in to the possibility of making some of these mills on
      the Mississippi River.

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Pioneeradventure/

      Jerry.


      On Jan 31, 2011, at 9:59 PM, Bill Sepmeier wrote:

      > http://www.lowtechmagazine.com/2010/11/boat-mills-bridge-mills-and-
      > hanging-mills.html
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      "Security is mostly a superstition, it does not exist in nature. Life
      is either a daring adventure or nothing." Helen Keller.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Nando
      Jerry: Capybara meat is leaner , looks like pork and chicken -- and test like them. High appreciated to the point that some people prefer it to any other meat.
      Message 53 of 53 , May 10, 2011
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        Jerry:

        Capybara meat is leaner , looks like pork and chicken -- and test like them.

        High appreciated to the point that some people prefer it to any other meat.

        The principle of using magnets on the outer ring -- has been tried often BUT most of those efforts do not realize the need to have a very accurate frame to place the "receiver" = the windings close enough to capture the energy produced by the passing magnets, in addition the metal core to close the magnetic fields and maximize the energy harvesting.

        and in the river where the coils will under and above water the frame becomes a nightmare.

        If you plan to try to produce energy, the easier and practical way is to have the wheel to pump water to an air chamber through a pipe that feeds a small Turgo turbine with a generator -- this way, though having less efficiency the need of gear boxes do not exist -

        The wheel can be one on the surface or a propeller submerged or even a :shoo- shoo train of under-water sails driving the water pump to produce water under pressure -- where 60 PSI could generate a good power level around 200 -250 watts per 16 GPM.

        I have been trying to get some photos of a scheme done in south America with an under water dual multi-propeller scheme to produce electrical power in areas of 1 KW in a river running at about 2 meter/sec.

        Wild Hogs though leaner, one needs to be carefully because they may carry diseases like "mouth disease" .

        I miss fishing and hunting times.

        Nando


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Jerry Scovel
        To: microhydro@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, May 10, 2011 1:06 AM
        Subject: Re: [microhydro] yes, lowtech mag - floating water mills and factories of days gone by



        Jerry,

        Riverats is still going, I was busy plowing the record snow all winter and sorta let it go. I like your idea of using magnets on the outer ring of the paddles, it will take some figuring on just how to do it though.

        Jerry.

        On May 9, 2011, at 12:30 PM, jerry freedomev wrote:

        Hi Nando and All,

        I can confirm capybara breeding in the wild as
        there is a mess of them just a few miles away in Gibsonton, Fla, just south of
        Tampa. Taste like chicken huh?? Guess I'll have to try it.

        And yes wild hogs are a big problem but good
        eating as more lean and tasty.

        Jerry, is riverats still going. Time for all
        those considering living on the river to go down to them to see what you need to
        do during flooding times here in the US. Why not put magnets on the paddle
        wheel with some coils attached to the float and transport electricity instead of
        water to make ewlectricity?


        Jerry Dycus

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Nando <nando37@...>
        To: microhydro@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Sun, May 8, 2011 10:19:48 PM
        Subject: Re: [microhydro] lowtech mag - floating water mills and factories of
        days gone by

        Tony:

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capybara

        Capybara is the largest rodent in the earth often reaching 100- 150 pounds and
        the meat tastes like Pork and Chicken at the same time, I used to hunt them in
        my native country -- they are not infestation, though they may have many members
        in a group.

        Venezuela area is trying to grow them wild and at the same time to harvest them
        as food -- which is highly appreciated by the local people, preferable to cattle
        meat, it is softer and it does not have fat , like the rabbits grown at home for
        meat and pelt, another business I did when going to high school.

        They do not exist in the southern USA.

        Though Wikipedia says :Sightings are fairly common in Florida, although a
        breeding population has not yet been confirmed ; this due to some escaping from
        captivity

        What does exist in the Southern USA is Feral Hogs, which are becoming now a
        problem since the birth rate is so high and they practically destroy the area
        where they are.

        I used to hunt them in - and some may reach 350 + lbs weight .

        Here in Texas, nearby to Dallas, in Waco a friend that has a large cattle farm
        says that there are too many of them now and I am too old to go hunting them
        again.

        Nando

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