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Re: [micRo-cnc] Added touch plate and optical end stops to my Micro V1

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  • Dale Botkin
    On 6/17/2013 3:51 PM, kurt_scuba wrote: For some reason I had gathered that a touch plate wasn t really much of a necessity, but I ve since discovered that
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 17, 2013
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      On 6/17/2013 3:51 PM, kurt_scuba wrote:
       

      For some reason I had gathered that a touch plate wasn't really much of a necessity, but I've since discovered that that is a crazy idea. The amount of time savings just from this one input is amazing. What used to be an hour of fiddling is now touch and go..

      A touch plate makes a world of difference.  I just rigged up a simple cable with 2 alligator clips and a short piece of aluminum angle, .060" thick.  For my next project, I want to make a "touch cup".  I put a 1/8" hole at the zero point on all of my jigs.  I want to make a cup shaped touchplate that will plug into that hole, with a program that will touch off to the bottom surface, back off a bit, then find the exact center.  Right now I have to "eyeball" the XY alignment, since the jigs are all made of wood.  It's time consuming.

      The real challenge will be the fact that I use a single flute end mill 90% of the time - touching off to the side of something can have quite a bit of error, depending on how the EM is turned.  Still, I think the flute does make one full turn around the shank, so if I make the cup deep enough it should work.

      Dale

    • Dan Andersson
      Kurt, I use two laser pointers with lines instead of points. By mounting the 90 degrees twisted, I get a nice cross. It s absolutely useless :) But looks nice
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 17, 2013
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        Kurt,

        I use two laser pointers with lines instead of points.
        By mounting the 90 degrees twisted, I get a nice cross.

        It's absolutely useless :) But looks nice when I have visitors.

        //Danand

        On Tue, 18 Jun 2013 01:59:20 -0000
        "kurt_scuba" <kurt@...> wrote:

        > The dual print head is from http://www.qu-bd.com
        >
        > I'll add more pictures as that progresses.
        >
        > One of the first printer projects will be to print mounts for two laser line pointers, so X will mark the spot. Totally unnecessary, but that's typical for me.
        >
        > --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, Dan Andersson <dan@...> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > I thought about the 3D printer conversion.
        > >
        > > Please keep me posted on the progress.
        > >
        > > //Danand
        > >
        > > On Mon, 17 Jun 2013 20:51:04 -0000
        > > "kurt_scuba" <kurt@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > > I've added some photos because I've been giving my Micro a few upgrades lately. More to come soon.
        > > >
        > > > Optical end stops I purchased a long time ago from RepRap.org. Y and Z stop sensors are mounted on the Z block top. X is mounted on the back X block, the one that is away from the stepper. Aluminum angle brackets have slotted screw holes and are chopped to hit right in the interrupters. These end stops emit High (+5v) when they are interrupted, and Low (+.3v) when they are open. Since the Parallel port breakout switch inputs needs to be connected to ground when an end stops are interrupted, I created a circuit using two resistors as a voltage divider, and an NPN transistor to connect the switch input. I repeated this circuit 6 times to allow adapting all the end stops and anything else I come across.
        > > >
        > > > Touch plate is a Shark CNC touch plate from Rockler. It's basically all ready to go with the parallel breakout connection to ground for the switch inputs. Just be sure to use the magnetic lead that connects to the spindle as ground, because when the spindle is plugged in it's hand piece is connected to ground. Technically there is no need to connect the touch plate lead to the spindle when it is plugged it, but it doesn't hurt.
        > > >
        > > > For some reason I had gathered that a touch plate wasn't really much of a necessity, but I've since discovered that that is a crazy idea. The amount of time savings just from this one input is amazing. What used to be an hour of fiddling is now touch and go.
        > > >
        > > > I've also been machining a new face place for my driver case, which is an old SCSI rack mount case. The new face plate now has recessed holes for the 4 and 5 pin screw connectors I use as stepper connections and the new inputs, and a hole to allow a standard wall electrical box to be mounted for the relay controlled power.
        > > >
        > > > After I mount and wire up the face plate, the CNC is going to get a conversion to be a 3D Printer. This will be done using a Panucatt.com X3. I also have several heated base plate options, and dual print heads from a Kickstarter project. I imagine that will be quite an adventure to get it all working correctly.
        > > >
        > > > Kurt
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • micRo-cnc-owner@yahoogroups.com
        One of these cross laser pointers works for me. http://dx.com/p/2-5mw-cross-laser-module-3v-46393 Rick
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
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          One of these cross laser pointers works for me.

          http://dx.com/p/2-5mw-cross-laser-module-3v-46393

          Rick

          --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, Dan Andersson <dan@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          > Kurt,
          >
          > I use two laser pointers with lines instead of points.
          > By mounting the 90 degrees twisted, I get a nice cross.
          >
          > It's absolutely useless :) But looks nice when I have visitors.
          >
          > //Danand
          >
        • micRo-cnc-owner@yahoogroups.com
          Dale, What about touching off just the X axis, say at 1 , and then just the Y axis at 1 , using the shank of the EM? Then, 0,0 should be the same each time.
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
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            Dale,
            What about touching off just the X axis, say at 1", and then just the Y axis at 1", using the shank of the EM? Then, 0,0 should be the same each time. You could add the touch off points to your jigs so it wouldn't matter where you place the jig on the base.

            Rick

            On 6/17/2013 3:51 PM, kurt_scuba wrote:

            For some reason I had gathered that a touch plate wasn't really much of a necessity, but I've since discovered that that is a crazy idea. The amount of time savings just from this one input is amazing. What used to be an hour of fiddling is now touch and go..


            A touch plate makes a world of difference. I just rigged up a simple cable with 2 alligator clips and a short piece of aluminum angle, .060" thick. For my next project, I want to make a "touch cup". I put a 1/8" hole at the zero point on all of my jigs. I want to make a cup shaped touchplate that will plug into that hole, with a program that will touch off to the bottom surface, back off a bit, then find the exact center. Right now I have to "eyeball" the XY alignment, since the jigs are all made of wood. It's time consuming.

            The real challenge will be the fact that I use a single flute end mill 90% of the time - touching off to the side of something can have quite a bit of error, depending on how the EM is turned. Still, I think the flute does make one full turn around the shank, so if I make the cup deep enough it should work.

            Dale
          • Dale Botkin
            That would work, but I m basically lazy. If I just used the tip of the EM for X & Y touch-off I d have to make sure the tool was rotated to hit the shank (or
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 18, 2013
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              That would work, but I'm basically lazy.  If I just used the tip of the EM for X & Y touch-off I'd have to make sure the tool was rotated to hit the shank (or the flute) each way.  If I make the touch-off tube/cup deep enough, I can just drop the tool in and probe for the sides.  It's easy enough to find the center point of a circle, I just need to dig in and remember/learn how to add a button to EMC that will run a script automatically.  For the touch plate I'm thinking of a bit of brass tubing soldered to some PCB material with a short 1/8" shank on the bottom.  Eventually I'd like to machine one out of aluminum with a lathe, when I eventually get one.

              On 6/18/2013 6:12 AM, micRo-cnc-owner@yahoogroups.com wrote:
               

              Dale,
              What about touching off just the X axis, say at 1", and then just the Y axis at 1", using the shank of the EM? Then, 0,0 should be the same each time. You could add the touch off points to your jigs so it wouldn't matter where you place the jig on the base.

              Rick

              On 6/17/2013 3:51 PM, kurt_scuba wrote:

              For some reason I had gathered that a touch plate wasn't really much of a necessity, but I've since discovered that that is a crazy idea. The amount of time savings just from this one input is amazing. What used to be an hour of fiddling is now touch and go..

              A touch plate makes a world of difference. I just rigged up a simple cable with 2 alligator clips and a short piece of aluminum angle, .060" thick. For my next project, I want to make a "touch cup". I put a 1/8" hole at the zero point on all of my jigs. I want to make a cup shaped touchplate that will plug into that hole, with a program that will touch off to the bottom surface, back off a bit, then find the exact center. Right now I have to "eyeball" the XY alignment, since the jigs are all made of wood. It's time consuming.

              The real challenge will be the fact that I use a single flute end mill 90% of the time - touching off to the side of something can have quite a bit of error, depending on how the EM is turned. Still, I think the flute does make one full turn around the shank, so if I make the cup deep enough it should work.

              Dale

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