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Re: Modding for more rigidity on an M3?

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  • ipeerbhai@ymail.com
    Ok, I m coming in late to an old topic. Where is the flex coming from -- anyone figure it out? Is it the base? If it s the base -- why not re-enforce on the
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 27, 2012
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      Ok, I'm coming in late to an old topic.
      Where is the flex coming from -- anyone figure it out? Is it the base?

      If it's the base -- why not re-enforce on the under side with 80/20 or something bolted down in strategic locations? For example, around the edges or something?

      You could even attach ren-forcement strips ( kind of like turning the base into a giant T beam )?

      Also -- The micRo is nice because of appearance. I don't know enough about it -- is it actually a good mill? What are its limits, and why?


      --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, "mikauvalley" <rein.vall@...> wrote:
      >
      > My 6 cents worth.
      > --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, Dan Andersson <dan@> wrote
      > > Concrete base?
      > > Yes, it works fine. It's easy to make the base absolutely flat and you
      > can allow the alu base ( if still used ) to rest on the concrete base.To
      > make a concrete base absolutely flat for cnc accuracy, it would have to
      > be polished with a precise machine. Very difficult.
      > > However, retaining the alu base is retaining very much of the problem.
      > By using an soft adhesive that allows setting the base plate like a
      > tile, the aluminum base will not deflect once the adhesive sets, but you
      > will have to live with any pre-existing plate warps.
      > > First,you need a water proof concrete to avoid conamination,
      > absorbtion and leakage of oil and cooling fluid. It really does not
      > matter if the concrete gets stained for this application. The soft
      > adhesive between the concrete and the aluminum plate will create
      > dielectric isolation to keep the aluminum base from corroding by
      > avoiding direct contact to the concrete. (This is why aluminum
      > flashings embedded in masonry walls are coated with asphalt). Sealing
      > the concrete with a concrete sealer would help in minimizing aluminum
      > corrosion assuming oil or cooling fluid that get on concrete gets back
      > up on aluminum base plate, via a coolant pump system, assuming you are
      > cutting metals.
      > > Secondly, you need to mount the X way corner posts in the concrete
      > base and get rid of the alu base. The alu base is the reason to the
      > rigidy problem.It is really difficult to set the corner posts absolutely
      > level and at exact locations at all corners of concrete unless you have
      > another gantry mill to do that. Keeping the base is the easier option.
      > Mikau.
      >
    • m0dfi
      Flex, where is the flex coming from? At low XY forces, the base. At high XY forces, the base and the two gantry blocks. At low and high Z forces, the base and
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 6, 2012
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        Flex, where is the flex coming from?

        At low XY forces, the base.

        At high XY forces, the base and the two gantry blocks.

        At low and high Z forces, the base and the Zblock mount. You get lower flex and better accuracy at the XY corners due to less base flex.

        A good mill? Yes, one of the very best small mills due to lumenlabs spending on MacMaster quality stuff - one of the reasons the went bust. The micRO was to expensive to build at the price the sold it for.

        A good mill? Yes, in my opinion, one of the best below 5000$.

        If we can sort out the base flex once and for all, it is abrilliant cnc, especially the smaller M2.


        //Dan

        --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, "ipeerbhai@..." <ipeerbhai@...> wrote:
        >
        > Ok, I'm coming in late to an old topic.
        > Where is the flex coming from -- anyone figure it out? Is it the base?
        >
        > If it's the base -- why not re-enforce on the under side with 80/20 or something bolted down in strategic locations? For example, around the edges or something?
        >
        > You could even attach ren-forcement strips ( kind of like turning the base into a giant T beam )?
        >
        > Also -- The micRo is nice because of appearance. I don't know enough about it -- is it actually a good mill? What are its limits, and why?
        >
        >
        > --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, "mikauvalley" <rein.vall@> wrote:
        > >
        > > My 6 cents worth.
        > > --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, Dan Andersson <dan@> wrote
        > > > Concrete base?
        > > > Yes, it works fine. It's easy to make the base absolutely flat and you
        > > can allow the alu base ( if still used ) to rest on the concrete base.To
        > > make a concrete base absolutely flat for cnc accuracy, it would have to
        > > be polished with a precise machine. Very difficult.
        > > > However, retaining the alu base is retaining very much of the problem.
        > > By using an soft adhesive that allows setting the base plate like a
        > > tile, the aluminum base will not deflect once the adhesive sets, but you
        > > will have to live with any pre-existing plate warps.
        > > > First,you need a water proof concrete to avoid conamination,
        > > absorbtion and leakage of oil and cooling fluid. It really does not
        > > matter if the concrete gets stained for this application. The soft
        > > adhesive between the concrete and the aluminum plate will create
        > > dielectric isolation to keep the aluminum base from corroding by
        > > avoiding direct contact to the concrete. (This is why aluminum
        > > flashings embedded in masonry walls are coated with asphalt). Sealing
        > > the concrete with a concrete sealer would help in minimizing aluminum
        > > corrosion assuming oil or cooling fluid that get on concrete gets back
        > > up on aluminum base plate, via a coolant pump system, assuming you are
        > > cutting metals.
        > > > Secondly, you need to mount the X way corner posts in the concrete
        > > base and get rid of the alu base. The alu base is the reason to the
        > > rigidy problem.It is really difficult to set the corner posts absolutely
        > > level and at exact locations at all corners of concrete unless you have
        > > another gantry mill to do that. Keeping the base is the easier option.
        > > Mikau.
        > >
        >
      • mikauvalley
        Hi Folks:Flex comes from everthing: the thin base, the guide rails, the plastic blocks, how the spindle (a) is mounted, the material being milled (b), the
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 15, 2012
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          Hi Folks:
          Flex comes from everthing: the thin base, the guide rails, the  plastic blocks, how the spindle (a) is mounted, the material being milled (b), the sacrificial piece, the clamping of the stock (c), the feed rate (d) of milling, the length/thickness/sharpness (e) of the end mill, and others, I'm sure.
            a.  I have seen some pictures of user's micro's with the spindle gripped at the top.  Gripping it at the bottom would make it more rigid.
            b.  Some materials will flex more than others during milling.  Also, some materials, if not properly annealed, will warp during milling, such as in metals.  Even plastics will warp at thinned-out areas.
            c.  Location of stock clamps can affect flexing of stock and base.
            d.  Innapropriate feed rates (speed, bite) will flex stock, base, blocks, end mills.
            e.  Long, thin end mill will flex when feed rate is too high and deep for tool being used and material being cut; a dull tip will not help.

          So the best defense against flex is knowledge of how to incorporate all the parameters optimally for the strength and limitations of the MicRo.  If you want super accurate conditions, mortgage your home and buy a mill that has parts as thick as a dinosaur's neck.  Other than that, the micRo is a great little machine for the price.

          Mikau

          --- In micRo-cnc@yahoogroups.com, "m0dfi" <dan@...> wrote:
          >
          > Flex, where is the flex coming from? 
          > A good mill? Yes, in my opinion, one of the best below 5000$.

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