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Applying cirrus logic to Southern Hemisp

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  • Pawnfart
    The foregoing is a very rough sketch. I think where I am having the most fun ripping on skeptics and other chaos worshippers is discrediting the argument that
    Message 1 of 702 , May 4, 2001
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      The foregoing is a very rough sketch. I think
      where I am having the most fun ripping on skeptics and
      other chaos worshippers is discrediting the argument
      that water is the GHG that dominates and therefore
      human emissions of CO2 are harmless in comparision.
      Someone forgot to consider that Gaia modulates water and
      Gaia's creature, metanogens, breath CO2. So I agree,
      Warmers, that water is a powerful GHG:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.clearlight.com/~mhieb/WVFossils/greenhouse_contrib.html target=new>http://www.clearlight.com/~mhieb/WVFossils/greenhouse_contrib.html</a> <br><br>And soon you will turn to my theory as it
      explains the warming--despite the dams. <br><br>Let's
      start with the notion that ocean and air behave in
      "coupled" manner. This points to a something that holds
      them together. Put that in the catagory of
      circumstantial evidence of cirrus cloud as a forcing.
      <br><br><a href=http://ams.confex.com/ams/Polar-AirSe/11AirSea/abstracts/20588.htm target=new>http://ams.confex.com/ams/Polar-AirSe/11AirSea/abstracts/20588.htm</a> <br><br>TROPOSPHERE RESPONSE TO SST ANOMALIES IN
      THE ANTARCTIC CIRCUMPOLAR WAVE IN THE SOUTHERN OCEAN
      Warren B. White SIO/Univ. of California, La Jolla, CA
      92093-0230. and Shyh-Chin Chen. <br><br>The following links
      are background to my sketch. This link works if you
      add a g, i and f to it:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.oceansonline.com/images/currents. target=new>http://www.oceansonline.com/images/currents.</a> <br><br>This shows were MH fields are located:
      <br><br><a href=http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/hydrates/where.html target=new>http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/project-pages/hydrates/where.html</a> <br><br>But also consider they suspend oceanwide:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/sand.html target=new>http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/sand.html</a> <br><br>Finally, here is a quick link on
      Fleming's left hand rule:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.le.ac.uk/se/centres/sci/selfstudy/mam12.htm target=new>http://www.le.ac.uk/se/centres/sci/selfstudy/mam12.htm</a> <br><br>Southern ocean current causes downward
      movement of electrical current, where as sun charging
      ionosphere moves w/ spin of earth in other
      direction--essentially causing upward electrical current, positive to
      negitive, out into space. With more flaring comes a
      stronger upward electrical current.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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