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Re: Links, comments to Fred and B-1

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  • pawnfart
    Patterns of tree cover may well very by the arraingment of the terresphere--so what is true in OZ may differ for what is true in, say, N. America. But the
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 18, 2002
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      Patterns of tree cover may well very by the arraingment of the
      terresphere--so what is true in OZ may differ for what is true in,
      say, N. America.

      But the bottom line is this. Pine or evergreens at or near a snow
      line are going to have a different impact on what gets washed down
      into rivers. Trees with falling leaves are going to cause rotting
      material to flow down into rivers in a seasonal pulse--in the fall
      and winter or even the spring with the initial rains--to be set for
      prime microbrial conditions in the spring when the heaviest winds
      induct currents, and make for regional storm conditions. So it
      would make sense that certain trees would evolve for certain climate
      conditions, particularly for mountain regions or snow line regions
      compared to forrested plains.


      Tropical plants seem to be another thing altogether, limited by
      nutrients found in the soil but not by season. Seasonal pulses of
      increased electrical insulation from hydrates wouldn't help their
      survival--IMO. Therefore, they do not defoliate with teh seasons.

      Evolution is awesome.

      --- In methanehydrateclub@y..., "b1blancer_29501" <b1blancer1@e...>
      wrote:
      > Evergreens exist around these parts, too! If you come to the
      > Carolinas, you'll see LOTS of pines, along with Magnolia, Camelia,
      > Cedar, and Rhodadendron (sp?) and Mountain Laurel up in the
      Applachians.
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