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[Methane Hydrate Club] Re: Warming Southern Oceans; Fleming's right hand rule/Fred

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  • Ed Boik
    ... snow has a higher albedo than clouds. If there are less clouds over a snow covered area, the temperatures can absolutly plummet at night and it takes a
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 2 7:30 AM
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      >>therefore surface temperatures should be increasing over the interior

      >not decreasing since the cooling reported is occuring mostly during
      >the summer months when the sun is out 24/7.

      >More clouds = less solar energy reaching the surface during summer.
      >Less clouds = more solar energy reaching the surface during summer.

      snow has a higher albedo than clouds. If there are less clouds over a
      snow covered area, the temperatures can absolutly plummet at night and
      it takes a great deal of energy to recover to a decent temp. Snowfall
      is a incredible reflector. Almost all available energy is sent back to
      space, and any energy left in the snow is emmitted back too. A snow
      covered ground of a cloudy day and night is not as cold.


      you said "As I have been mentioning here, warmer melts the glacial
      ice, and can put cold capping waters to the ENSO cycle. It also means
      that induction that generally occurs is stronger, and in this case is
      against cirrus formation--which explains the cold interior of
      Antarctica."

      I say the opposite is true!






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • pawnfart
      Interesting comments. I would add that with the WESTWARD wind and currents where there is that EDDY in the Southern Ocean s generally circumpolar EASTWARD
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 2 9:02 AM
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        Interesting comments.

        I would add that with the WESTWARD wind and currents where there is
        that EDDY in the Southern Ocean's generally circumpolar EASTWARD
        currents and winds, from that arm like reach toward the tail of South
        America, that is where B-21 and 22 calved and the rest of the ice
        shelf disapeared. Researchers there noted a 5 degree C. increase in
        temps, which to me is huge. Once the ice starts to melt the albedo
        changes dramatically, and where it changes is in the cracks of the
        ice, hastening its breakup.

        Low clouds, without overhead cover, I would also add, from cirrus
        reduction are also highly reflective. Melting ice might produce
        those low clouds . . .

        --- In methanehydrateclub@y..., "Ed Boik" <eboik@c...> wrote:
        > >>therefore surface temperatures should be increasing over the
        interior
        >
        > >not decreasing since the cooling reported is occuring mostly
        during
        > >the summer months when the sun is out 24/7.
        >
        > >More clouds = less solar energy reaching the surface during
        summer.
        > >Less clouds = more solar energy reaching the surface during
        summer.
        >
        > snow has a higher albedo than clouds. If there are less clouds
        over a
        > snow covered area, the temperatures can absolutly plummet at night
        and
        > it takes a great deal of energy to recover to a decent temp.
        Snowfall
        > is a incredible reflector. Almost all available energy is sent
        back to
        > space, and any energy left in the snow is emmitted back too. A snow
        > covered ground of a cloudy day and night is not as cold.
        >
        >
        > you said "As I have been mentioning here, warmer melts the glacial
        > ice, and can put cold capping waters to the ENSO cycle. It also
        means
        > that induction that generally occurs is stronger, and in this case
        is
        > against cirrus formation--which explains the cold interior of
        > Antarctica."
        >
        > I say the opposite is true!
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ed Boik
        yep, cirrus clouds are not insulators or reflectors. they are window shades in respect to heating. [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 2 9:07 AM
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          yep, cirrus clouds are not insulators or reflectors. they are 'window
          shades' in respect to heating.


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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