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Re: Extreme weather, MHs, electrical asp

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  • Pawnfart
    Note that the ancient earth was warmed by a sun 25% cooler than today s sun. There have been extreme ups and downs of different aspects of the earth s ecology,
    Message 1 of 702 , Feb 1, 2001
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      Note that the ancient earth was warmed by a sun
      25% cooler than today's sun. There have been extreme
      ups and downs of different aspects of the earth's
      ecology, but a homostasis has remained to evolutionary
      dynamic that stabolizes earth systems. In short, the old
      model of earth sciences as non-biological was flawed.
      <br><br>Likewise, the model of CO2 emissions as a chemical
      greenhouse gas ignores the dramatic biological aspect of
      CO2. Methanogens consume CO2, and have regulated the
      planet planet progressively for BILLIONS of years.
      Initially, it was methane gas released by the methanogens
      could have acted mechanically, and as a Green house
      gas, to impact climate, but later as the methanogens
      were restricted to anaerobic conditions, their climate
      role was more defined to vertical movements of
      oceans--and more subtilely, to creating electrical fields at
      anaerobic depths that cooled the earth where it was
      aerobic. This is the fundimental feedback loop not
      considered in the climate debate whether defect created by
      with respect to fossil fuel and SOx emissions.
      <br><br>The idea that suspended methane hydrate affects the
      electical properties of the oceans is not far fetched:
      <br><br><a href=http://geophy.physics.utoronto.ca/group/students/jian.html target=new>http://geophy.physics.utoronto.ca/group/students/jian.html</a> <br><br>Link above about hydrates being an
      insolater <br><br><a href=http://www.dieoff.org/page225.htm target=new>http://www.dieoff.org/page225.htm</a>
      <br><br>Link above states:<br><br>"Goldfinger et al., 1999,
      report; "Because methane is susceptible to oxidation
      through both microbial and inorganic reactions along its
      flow path, determining the fate of mobilized methane
      is critical for evaluating the role of gas hydrate
      in earth history and in global change." Sloan et al
      1999: "Bacterial oxidation of the methane produces a
      bicarbonate anion, which binds with the calcium present in
      seawater to produce the carbonate. <br><br>. . .
      <br><br>In Cascadia, much of the loss of methane from the
      water column is due to oxidation rather than mixing
      (Whitcar, 1999). Evidently, living organisms oxide methane
      very quickly, as confirmed by de Angelis et al 1999,
      who state: "Clam and snail shells exhibited specific
      oxidation rates equivalent to the removal of 24 to 110 %
      available methane per square cm per day. Bacterial mats
      sampled from carbonate rock surfaces were observed to be
      capable of removing 16 to 86 % of ambient methane per
      square cm of surface per day"
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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