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  • Pawnfart
    The decrease in tropical clouds is consistant with warmer ocean temperatures and, therefore, an increase in ocean conductivity. Until electrical fields and
    Message 1 of 702 , Feb 7, 2002
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      The decrease in tropical clouds is consistant
      with warmer ocean temperatures and, therefore, an
      increase in ocean conductivity. Until electrical fields
      and biological insulation of those fields is
      discussed by those who study these patterns of clouds (and
      none of them have biological or electronics
      backgrounds, so it may take awhile), you will see chaos idiots
      making Gaia arguements on behalf of fossil fuel
      interests, not knowing what they are saying, and ecologists
      defending bad heat dynamic science missing its causal
      forcing. <br><br>Let me clarify a little on the Wielicki
      SciAm summary of his papers in response to Lindzen/less
      tropical clouds in 1990s (I still haven't seen the actual
      paper so if anyone has a link I would appreciate it and
      if it is sold on line it would be nice to see
      saliant portions posted here :)). <br><br>There are two
      parts to higher CO2. Higher surface temps from CO2 as a
      GHG and also from more cirrus enhancement. That is
      the biological part. The surface temps will in turn
      heat the oceans (measured and beyond dispute warmer
      SSTs and deep ocean temps). Now, here is the kicker.
      If ocean SSTs are warmer, they are more specifically
      conductive. <br><br>Weilicki's results showed less clouds in
      the 1990s. Aside from SOx of Mt. Pinatubo and the
      reduction of phase change temperatures of cirrus clouds
      during this period, warmer SSTs is going to have a two
      fold impact. For westward moving winds the clouds will
      be enhanced. But for EASTWARD MOVING WINDS, the
      cirrus will blow up MORE, just like my child's hair
      stands on end on the tramp. As this is a TROPICAL study,
      warmest waters and convection is going to be in the
      counters and EASTWARD movements--so their you go. Same
      idea with Lindzen's iris. What both of them miss is
      that the west moving currents above and below (north
      and south of) the equatorial counter will enhance
      cirrus more. The danger is non-linear change and
      increases in extremes.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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