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Re: Extreme weather, MHs, electrical asp

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  • Pawnfart
    This sets up a mystery. What electrical energy derives from the oceans? My view is we are again talking about methanogenic activity, and releases of methane
    Message 1 of 702 , Feb 1, 2001
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      This sets up a mystery. What electrical energy
      derives from the oceans? My view is we are again talking
      about methanogenic activity, and releases of methane
      hydrates. The clashes with the second part of his
      electrical/mechanical storm model, the jet, simply organize this
      potential. But what is the jet? What moves it? Furthermore,
      high frequency light would then be able to move
      through the "organized" holes in the ionosphere are
      energize the air both electrically and mechanically in a
      likewise organized manner. What organizes the chaos of
      weather? Climate itself implies
      organization.<br><br>Consider the sun's role given that severe thunderstorms
      often occur in the late afternoon. <br><br><br>What is
      missing from most climate analysis, in my humble view,
      are the interplaying roles that rivers,
      sedimentation, seasons, vertical changes of oceans, upper
      atmosphere, methane hydrates and very living methanogens
      have. Part of the problem is that humans tend to focus
      on the strata they live on, ignoring what is deep
      below or high above them. They also don't give much
      credit to lower life forms. <br><br>The Gaia living
      earth theory would support this kind of biological
      induced cooling. The oceans, becoming too charged with
      electrical and/or heat energy, could quickly maintain their
      homeostasis with an ability to move heat electrically, rather
      then via diffusion. A ocean storm model of
      methonogenic/methane hydrate activity also explains the patchwork
      issues of lack of methane hydrate fields to explain the
      role of these ice crystals in global climate that has
      prompted some to speculate that they play a lessor role in
      climate. By analogy, it would be like saying that since
      there is no long standing snow on the ground, it never
      snows in an area at a given season, or that snow isn't
      part of an areas weather and climate. <br><br>The Gaia
      Hypothesis--links:
      <br><br><a href=http://www.magna.com.au/~prfbrown/gaia_jim.html target=new>http://www.magna.com.au/~prfbrown/gaia_jim.html</a>
      <br><br><a href=http://www.uta.edu/geology/geol1425earth_system/1425chap11.htm target=new>http://www.uta.edu/geology/geol1425earth_system/1425chap11.htm</a>
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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