Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Roman fall not the sun

Expand Messages
  • b1blancer_29501
    Sunspots are a magnetic phenomenon. Basically a sunspot occurs when the sun s magnetic field lines poke through the photosphere. They appear as dark splotches
    Message 1 of 702 , Jan 6, 2002
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Sunspots are a magnetic phenomenon. Basically a
      sunspot occurs when the sun's magnetic field lines poke
      through the photosphere. They appear as dark splotches on
      the face of the sun. They appear dark because the gas
      in the region of a sunspot is cooler than the
      surrounding gas.<br><br>Sunspots are regions of magnetic
      instability. By looking at the magnetic field lines around a
      sunspot, you can tell how likely it is to generate a
      flare, and what intensity the flare will have. Generally
      speaking, the more twisted and tangled the magnetic field
      lines are, the greater the flare potential. A flare is
      basically a sudden, explosive release of magnetic energy
      caused when a twisted, tangled magnetic field suddenly
      snaps. Look at this picture, and look at the bright
      region in the lower center portion of the picture.
      <a href=http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/realtime/javagif/gifs_small/20020106_1326_eit_195.gif target=new>http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/data/realtime/javagif/gifs_small/20020106_1326_ei
      t_195.gif</a> <br><br>You can actually see the gas caught up in
      the sunspot's magnetic field. It looks kind of like a
      giant bar magnet, doesn't it? That's basically what a
      sunspot is...a very big bar magnet, with a north and a
      south pole. BTW, this image was captured by the SOHO
      satellite with it's extreme UV telescope. Sunspots radiate
      brightly in UV.<br><br>Now, having said all that, a
      sunspot doesn't necessarily always produce a flare, and a
      flare doesn't necessarily have to be produced by a
      sunspot region. Those flares that occur in a sunpot free
      region are called Hyder flares. They are relatively
      rare, however.<br><br>So, to sum up, if you see a lot
      of large sunspots, you can generally infer that
      there is at least the potential of a lot of flares.
      Obviously a cloud cover will keep you from observing the
      sun, but with maybe a few exceptions, its certainly
      not going to be cloudy every day, no matter where you
      oberrve from. Since a solar cycle peak period will last
      for a year or more, even if you only had, say, an
      average of 1 clear day out of 5, that should certainly be
      enough to establish where in the solar cycle you are,
      and give you a reasonable estimate of sunspot
      activity.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment
        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.