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Roman fall not the sun

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  • Pawnfart
    Waning sunspot activity is a symptom of a weakened Sun, which could make the world cool by around half a degree. Meteorologist Kevin Pang found that sunspots
    Message 1 of 702 , Jan 5, 2002
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      "Waning sunspot activity is a symptom of a
      weakened Sun, which could make the world cool by around
      half a degree. Meteorologist Kevin Pang found that
      sunspots were conspicuously absent from the historical
      record. "That was just about the time the Roman Empire
      fell in 476," he says. The gaps in sunspot sightings
      coincided with high levels of carbon-14 in tree
      rings-another indicator of fainter solar activity-he told the
      American Geophysical Union last week." <br><br>Betsy Mason
      <br><br>From New Scientist magazine, vol 172 issue 2322,
      22/12/2001, page 11<br><br>Comment:<br><br>Sun spot activity
      has only been properly observed for about 100 years,
      and well observed only recently. This speculation is
      false. The problem is that flaring causes electrical
      enhancement of cirrus--provided that the ocean's surface
      temperatures and cirrus and methane hydrate fields are working
      for Gaia. In this case, the methane hydrate fields
      are depressurized by changes in the moons orbit. See
      <br><br><a href=http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/97/8/3814/F2 target=new>http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/97/8/3814/F2</a> <br><br>which is part of
      <br><br><a href=http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/070047197 target=new>http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/full/070047197</a> <br><br>This is our Little Ice Age mechanism, and
      during different geological periods it caused snow ball
      earths--as the moon was half the distance it is to the earth
      as it is now. <br><br>The next time for this methane
      hydrate depressurization event, although not the smallest
      of the "Little"--2133. Until then, the hydrate
      fields have dams disrupting them and perhaps warmer deep
      ocean temps, but mostly they have more detritus and CO2
      to make them very healthy and very insulating--and
      hence part of a warming period. <br><br>Since the
      terresphere is mostly to the northern hemisphere, where the
      run off and methanogen activity would most take place
      and where most of the hydrate fields are found
      insulating the ocean floor, that is where most of our
      century's warming has been found. Lately I have been
      talking about cool summers, which is related to the
      electrical energy staying above the ocean floor, and hence
      when the sun and earth are at the greatest distance
      from one another and the least amount of flaring
      particles of ions are sorted, it is our hemispheric summer.
      If over the course of the year, electrical energies
      have been absorbed by the earth and its magnetic
      field, cirrus can be enhanced even during the summer.
      But if less gets into the earth via insulation from
      the hydrates, there is less enhancement and also less
      wind driven induction from the changing seasonal
      thermodynamic contrasts. I realize this is complex, but it may
      be the mechanism of the neo glacial, where
      precipitation occurs during the colder months and it stays cold
      during the summer months for lack of cirrus enhancement.
      But I seriously doubt we are in for a neo-glacial
      because of the Black Sea, new to the Gaia feedbacks, and
      the relative health of hydrate fields in the North
      Pacific, where Seattle is known modernly for its rain and
      not its glacial ice (I wonder what heavy siesmic
      activity would do to these fields). Consider why there is
      rain in Seattle and desert near the Dead Sea--which is
      a glacial lake! That is your climate stability over
      the past 12,000 years.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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