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B-1, the person who called you

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  • Pawnfart
    a technician, or whatever, was just corrected by a physics professor: Well mike you ve surprised me. The following quote contains a physical entity
    Message 1 of 702 , Dec 10, 2001
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      a technician, or whatever, was just corrected by
      a physics professor:<br><br>"Well mike you've
      surprised me. The following quote contains a physical
      entity (boldfaced) no one on this list has ever alluded
      to. More below." <br>Mike wrote <br>"The coupling
      mechanisms was said by them not to be well understood, but
      it seems probable that "capacitive coupling" through
      the displacement current my drive conduction currents
      within the ionosphere [Hale and Baginski, 1987]. From
      this link, is evidence of the incredible currents
      involved:" <br>Now displacement current has a very specific
      physical meaning; I wouldn't have thought it ever entered
      into any geophysical calculation. What do you
      understand this expression to mean? Maybe I'd better tell
      what it means and you just tell us if the authors who
      used this expression meant something else. The
      displacement current is the uncharged electrical current which
      passes between the plates of any capacitive elements in
      order to maintain field continuity--in particular the H
      field flux. The electrical current is uncharged by
      virtue of being composed of equal numbers of virtual
      positive charges moving one way and negative charges
      moving the other. <br><br><br>Alan (and Dave D)As a
      check here; the stored energy of a capacitor is <br>1/2
      C *V^2. <br>Therefore using these numbers we get
      <br>41.65 *10^8 watts for the stored energy in fair
      agreement with your 5.25*10^8 watts. (I believe farads and
      ordinary volts are both MKS units.) Ooops I see, I've got
      energy and you had power. Therefore my units are watt x
      time. From the time constant of 1.64 second, I would
      guess that the total stored energy is 41.65 *10^8
      watt-seconds. This equals 41.65/3600/1000 = 11*10*2 kw-hrs or
      about $50. <br>I confess I haven't looked up the
      earth's capacitance; but your expression worries me. The
      relevant capacitance for the fair weather current should
      be the capacitance of concentric spheres separated
      by the distance from surface to (roughly)
      tropopause--yet you have no separation distance. So if for the
      distance in your formula we use area/separation instead of
      R, we would increase the capacitance by
      4*pi*radius/separation +AH4- 12 * 4000/6 +AH 8000. This might the source
      of the discrepancy between your value and Dave D's
      quoted larger value.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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