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Re: B-1, Don't take Alan's comment's

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  • Pawnfart
    Only a slight angle difference from tangant would either put a current out to space or direct it more below. From there conductivity issues of SSTs may be
    Message 1 of 702 , Dec 6, 2001
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      Only a slight angle difference from tangant would
      either put a current out to space or direct it more
      below. From there conductivity issues of SSTs may be
      responsible for sorting of charges to the ocean--there are a
      number of issues here. These issues certainly will have
      to be detailed out and will require physics based
      scholars. But that doesn't mean that Gaia is some fluffy
      new religion--it remains the foundation for an idea
      that the climate is a product of the biology's changes
      toward survival, for instance the ever increasing
      lumenousity. <br><br>It should be noted that during the 11
      year flaring cycle, per Theodor at John Daly's site,
      there is a 2% increase in the ionosphere from Min to
      Max. This flaring change is met with a substantial
      increase in warming desptie lumenousity only increasing a
      small amount. That points straight to the expanding
      ionosphere and interactions with the magnesphere and flaring
      as a source of cirrus enhancment . . . I forgot to
      mention that the SST/electron-proton sorting that must
      occur for ENSO may impact the southern ocean (the
      southern ocean oscillation) sooner (4 months per Theodor
      at Daly's) because of the isobars coming together
      and the nature of that current/wind as circumpolar
      over water. <br><br>and treating the
      <br><br>collisions as elastic. However, I don't see any of this
      pressure mechanism in Mike's assertions. JAL Alan wrote
      mike wrote: <br><br>> <SNIP> > Solar wind
      speed : 664.5 km/sec > Solar wind density : 5.3
      protons/cc > Solar wind pressure : 3.9 nPa > >
      <SNIP> > What I think you should note more then
      anything is the proton stream from > the sun, because
      these are particles that will be sorted by SSTs.
      <br><br>Mike what I want you to note, is just how small this
      flux of protons appears to be to this dimbo
      technician. And if this is the solar wind before hitting the
      earth's surface, then presumably not all of these charges
      even make it to the earth. <br><br>***I really do need
      a physicist's comment here, **** if i=q/t, (where i
      = current in amps, & q = quantity of electric
      charges in Coulombs) and if the electrical charge on a
      electron is about 1.602 x 10^-19 coulombs, then we need to
      move: 1 / 1.602 x 10^-19C per sec to pass 1Amp of
      current. Or 6.24 x 10^18 electrons must be moved for a
      current of 1A. <br><br>The solar wind protons moving in a
      "tube" of space of csa 1cm^2 @ 664. km/s above would
      only move 5.3 x 664.5 x 1000m charges, or 3.52 x 10^6
      protons. If this calc. is correct, then you should be able
      to see that this is a *very small* movement of
      charges/second compared to even 1 ampere. [John L. please
      comment]
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1 9:47 PM
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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