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B-1, Don't take Alan's comment's

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  • Pawnfart
    cirrusly below--I know how smart you really are. On cirrus and movements by electrical fields there has been a heavy discussion at a climate debate list
    Message 1 of 702 , Dec 6, 2001
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      "cirrusly" below--I know how smart you really
      are. On cirrus and movements by electrical fields
      there has been a heavy discussion at a climate debate
      list server I am on where I shared your flaring data:
      <br><br><br>From: John Lerch <jlerch1@...>
      <br><br>Your numbers look right Alan. I would note that you
      end up with only ~10^-12 amps/cm^2, the amperage
      striking the earth is (4*10^3)^2 * 1.6^2* (10^5)^2 =3*10^4
      amps (neglecting the fact that the magnetic field
      increases the cross section for capture and neglecting that
      that capture is very transient--that most of the
      plasma spirals back out the same field lines it orbitted
      in on.) The 3.9 nPa seems more interesting though.
      3.9 nPa =~10^-14 atmospheres. With the pressure
      halving every couple of kilometers, log(base 2) (10^-14)
      ~47 and with the channelling of the whole earth's
      (and its magnetosphere) into a tube about 10^3 miles
      across at the poles for say a compression of 128 (=2^7)
      we get the pressure at about 40 (=47-7)*couple
      kilometers. So effectively the isobars at the poles from ~80
      km up are pushed down a couple whole kilometers.
      This is ignoring any heating <br>The ionosphere heats
      with the day and expands. As it does, it expands out
      to the upper part of the atmosphere, where the air
      is very thin and probably has no meaningful
      "insolative" impact. I understand the ionosphere will rise to
      150 miles during the day--correct me if my memory
      fails me. As it expands through the earth's magentic
      field, the ionosphere itself will induct a current per
      Fleming's RIGHT hand rule. That inducted electrical current
      moves in the direction of the new day. As the
      ionosphere contracts at night, the electrical inducted
      current moves in the direction of the day, again per
      Fleming's right hand rule. This accumulates electrons in
      the daytime hours in the daytime places. What that
      has to do with fog in the morning and how it burns
      off, and afternoon thunderstorms, I would only
      speculate. <br><br>But what I am certain of is how the
      direction of sustained winds and surface currents that go
      along with them also follow Fleming's right hand rule,
      at least in terms of an upward vector of electrical
      current, small as it may be, correspondes with cirrus
      enhancement. That is undeniable. <br><br>It may well be that
      the winds interact with how the expansion and
      contraction of the ionosphere sends currents toward the
      stratosphere.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1 9:47 PM
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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