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Re: October warmest month in recorded hi

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  • Pawnfart
    ++++++ Comments: A mere shift in winds alters whether the warmest waters are inducting electrical currents or not, and these wind shifts are
    Message 1 of 702 , Nov 23, 2001
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      ++++++<br><br>Comments:<br><br>A mere shift in
      winds alters whether the warmest waters are inducting
      electrical currents or not, and these wind shifts are
      associated with changes in ion particle flaring changes from
      the sun matched against salinity and temperatures on
      the ocean surface--in the context of biological
      modulation. The biosphere is being changed by dams,
      deforestation and CO2, and with greenery growing more and
      taking in more CO2, more goes to methane and methane
      hydrates, especially in the fall when the rotting is even
      greater then it has ever been in recorded history. Sed
      rates are also delayed from all the dams to later in
      the year. El Nino, or this shift of winds, is
      relative to temperature and salinity changes in the
      Pacific. This changes from melting of glacial ice in
      Antarctica, which this past year after three (and a half) La
      Ninas, has been reduced from those state sized ones that
      broke off after our last 500 year El Nino. With less
      melting, we see less upwelling off the coast of Peru of
      cold SSTs, and charges start to get sorted
      differently, no charge seperation from east to west, and there
      is a west wind over the equatorial waters. Boom, El
      Nino. Despite low flaring, particularly this summer,
      after the flaring we saw in the spring, I suspect that
      what has happened is flaring warmed waters in the
      tropics normally subject to EAST winds moved via currents
      to the counters, exactly when flaring was reduced,
      and there was a WEST wind, so that the cirrus warming
      occurred on warmer SSTs. Put into the context of the
      biological changes from higher CO2, deforestation and dams
      (as a season shifter) and the lack of volcanic
      sulfides in the air that might reduce cirrus phase change
      temps, and there you go.<br><br>This kind of thing is a
      mild harbinger of things to come.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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