Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Electrical aspects of Michelle

Expand Messages
  • Pawnfart
    Before landfall, because she is ran out of space, the right or west moving winds of the storm had less electrical causing activity then the electrical activity
    Message 1 of 702 , Nov 4, 2001
    • 0 Attachment
      Before landfall, because she is ran out of space,
      the right or west moving winds of the storm had less
      electrical causing activity then the electrical activity
      from convection to the south south, where despite this
      convection having a surface wind moving EAST, the convection
      is so intense that the cirrus is going to stay
      around anyway. The fact that the strongest convection
      and coldest cloud tops before landfall was to the
      south of the hidden eye is by itself proof of the
      electrical impact on cirrus. But because the winds are so
      intense and cirrus warming is more important hundreds of
      miles away, this should change wind speeds or intensity
      much (the elctrical distortion). (BTW, when a storm is
      really HUGE and you have those pinhole eyes--think about
      the incredible amount of negitive electrical activity
      pushed close to each other, repelling on the one hand
      and being attracted to the positive charges in the
      eye.)<br><br>Finally, I have to comment on those east winds hitting
      Florida. Given the biological post drought water
      conditions, and the shape of methane hydrates after the heavy
      rains we had, I suspect that the conditions over
      Florida are not only insulted and charged up w/ that WEST
      wind, but as this hurricane has now made its way over
      Cuba there will be a surface low that should flourish
      with those conditions, certainly more so then what
      Michelle is going to experiance with those mountains in
      Cuba.<br><br>Several Mets have commented that fall waves packing more
      punch in shearing apart tropical storms. I would say
      that there is a flaring issue in that during the
      summer months solar particles and lumenousity bears down
      at more direct angles. Meaning with fall storms
      something that is electrically significant is going to be
      difficult to change. That said, there has been a WEEK of
      WEST winds into Florida AND already you can see the
      north bands above Cuba moving nicely west. <br><br>In
      my view after being reduced by the mountains, and
      more significantly, having here electrical aspect
      seperated, this storm is going to come back over water and
      reorganize nicely near the Gulf Stream, at night, with a
      more northern track, in very favorable electrical
      conditions.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.