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Re: Ozone depletion and methane hydrates

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  • Pawnfart
    The Professor also theorized that the earth s atmosphere is protected by the geomagnetic layer such that only a small amount of the solar high-energy particles
    Message 1 of 702 , Feb 12, 2001
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      The Professor also theorized that the earth's
      atmosphere is protected by the geomagnetic layer such that
      only a small amount of the solar high-energy particles
      can penetrate it and reach the South and North poles
      along the lines of magnetic force. But this brings me
      back to the Gaia theory, that the magnetic field
      itself is a biological creation. And as the intensity of
      the solar winds have increased as the sun has aged,
      the biological feedbacks to cause this protective
      have intensified, to maintain a living homeostasis for
      the microbrial creatures that would be harmed by high
      levels of them striking the surface. The field also has
      had the effect of preventing hydrogen leaking.
      <br><br>It appears that any defect or substantial stimulas
      change to the climate feedback system described here is
      related to CO2 levels. It should be noted that CO2
      levels, according to geologists, has never reached 1% of
      the air. That is because the acidity of the aerosols
      would increase so much as to be recorded in dramatic
      sedimention deposits, that are NOT found in the geo records.
      Indeed, the Snow Ball earths of 750 to 550 million years
      ago that theoretically ended with CO2 from volcanoes
      put CO2 in the air at 750 times current levels--still
      under 1% of the air. While such a high level of CO2
      would have caused the sufficient surface GHG warming to
      melt the ocean surface, there would have been an
      accompanying lack of sedimentation on land until the melting
      occurred, and then the upper air would have had plenty of
      ionization to keep it very cold as more rapid sedimentation
      kicked in dramatic methanogen activity. Given the fact
      that the Whorf lunar changes from that time would have
      been even more dramatic, as the moon was substatially
      closer to the earth then it is now, and the tidal
      depressurization was far greater, I would say it was the injection
      of the CO2 that both caused the end of the Snow Ball
      Earth and the start of the next
      one.<br><br>Essentially, we are doing the same thing as a volcano putting
      out CO2, only much more efficiently, as we burn
      fossil fuels. And I suspect that the climate change
      aspects are going to be similar to the era of Snow Ball
      earths. Already we are in the midst of a glacial epoch,
      which are actually rare in geo history. Further, the
      moon is much further away then it was during the Snow
      Ball earths as the sun is more intense to the earth as
      it heads for red giant size. That puts high levels
      of CO2 as a defect in climate feedback loops in a
      far different place then in other places of geo
      history. Already, this glacial epoch is a significant
      extinction event, and man the emerging species. One has to
      wonder, however, if with recent human activity, if we
      won't soon be back to the microbes that have stood the
      test of time.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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