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Sunspot cycle intensity trend.

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  • David
    Just running this up to see who salutes it.... There seems to be a steady trend of declining intensity over the last three sunspot cycles. Cycle 19, which
    Message 1 of 3 , Aug 20, 2005
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      Just running this up to see who salutes it....

      There seems to be a steady trend of declining intensity over the last
      three sunspot cycles. Cycle 19, which peaked in the late 50's, was a
      doozy. It's been sort of lame since then.
    • space1weather
      ... Well froma sunspot trend you are right but when you consider solar eruptions..energtic flares ...geomagnetic activity...I do not know. This last one was a
      Message 2 of 3 , Aug 20, 2005
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        --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "David" <b1blancer1@e...>
        wrote:
        > Just running this up to see who salutes it....
        >
        > There seems to be a steady trend of declining intensity over the last
        > three sunspot cycles. Cycle 19, which peaked in the late 50's, was a
        > doozy. It's been sort of lame since then.

        Well froma sunspot trend you are right but when you consider solar
        eruptions..energtic flares ...geomagnetic activity...I do not know.

        This last one was a dud sunspot wise but look what we saw X-ray wise
        with the 10/03 flares and then this past January with the strongest
        proton flare since October 89'.


        Jim
      • David
        ... I remember the 10/89 flare. Aurora were visible in Charlotte, NC. Interestingly enough, solar scientists didn t even know there was any such thing as a
        Message 3 of 3 , Aug 21, 2005
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          >
          > Well froma sunspot trend you are right but when you consider solar
          > eruptions..energtic flares ...geomagnetic activity...I do not know.
          >
          > This last one was a dud sunspot wise but look what we saw X-ray wise
          > with the 10/03 flares and then this past January with the strongest
          > proton flare since October 89'.
          >
          >
          > Jim

          I remember the 10/89 flare. Aurora were visible in Charlotte, NC.
          Interestingly enough, solar scientists didn't even know there was any
          such thing as a CME until the first sun-watching satellites were
          launched in 1970 (I think). Cycle 20, which peaked around 1969, was a
          fairly weak one. I'll bet the Apollo astronauts are glad of that.
          Walking on the surface of the moon is not a good place to be if a
          sunspot decides to get nasty.
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