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Cooling of the 1970s--here's a Tip:

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  • Mike Doran
    Typhoon Tip in the Northwest Pacific Ocean on 12 October 1979 was measured to have a central pressure of 870 mb and estimated surface sustained winds based on
    Message 1 of 1 , May 8, 2005
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      Typhoon Tip in the Northwest Pacific Ocean on 12 October 1979 was
      measured to have a central pressure of 870 mb and estimated surface
      sustained winds based on aircraft dropsonde data of 85 m/s (165 kt,
      190 mph). It was not a category 5 for a particularly long period of
      time, as seen by the tracking data:

      http://www.weather.unisys.com/hurricane/w_pacific/1979/23/track.dat

      http://www.weather.unisys.com/hurricane/w_pacific/1979/23/track_s.gif

      from

      http://www.weather.unisys.com/hurricane/w_pacific/1979/index.html

      This storm marked the end of the 70s, a decade discussed in
      climatology as cold anomaly. Several journals postulated that we
      were headed for a neo glacial . . . and the fake skeptics often will
      point out to this decade as a reason to be doubt claims of global
      climate change. The decade began with the magnetic 'burp' and
      Hurricane Camille in the Gulf of Mexico, and ended with Tip.


      Tip also had the largest circulation pattern on record, 1379-nm
      radius.

      Tip followed a few weeks after Hurricanes David and Frederic in the
      Atlantic basin, which were both powerful landfalling hurricanes. The
      QBO data is fascinating. 1969 was a season where the QBO was
      positive and followed 22 months of negative readings ending in the
      spring of 1969. Tip followed in the West Pacific 16 months of
      positive QBO readings in the midst of a very short but intense set of
      negative readings:


      http://www.cdc.noaa.gov/Correlation/qbo.data

      =======JAN-----FEB-----MAR-----APR------MAY----JUNE---JULY----AUG-----
      SEP-----OCT-----NOV-----DEC

      1978 3.84 6.54 9.92 12.20 11.79 8.30 5.83
      6.04 6.11 6.35 4.83 1.54
      1979 1.86 4.12 0.89 -3.57 -12.90 -19.60 -21.27 -
      22.24 -22.70 -23.32 -22.20 -16.99
      1980 -10.11 -5.65 -2.90 2.31 6.24 7.33 8.74
      9.61 12.67 13.10 12.15 9.73

      Camille, as discussed, was a storm forming as an El Nino turned into
      a La Nina. Tip occurred in relatively neutral ENSO conditions on
      either side of the storm. The SOI index was neatly flipping back and
      forth, but after the storm, one of the largest El Ninos of all time
      occurred. I would point out that when the SOI is flipping like this,
      its modulation by gas exchange and there isn't a sustained enough
      wind between Darwin or Tahiti for the electrical property of
      INDUCTION to start to have a conductivity or impendence meaning on
      the capacitive couplings that are define the dynamics of these larger
      storms. It should be appreciated that even though Tip churned
      intensely for a few days that during that time, electrically, the
      intense kvolt transients have significant longer term climatology
      meaning to the global electrical patterns that define cloud
      microphysics.
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