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September 22, 2005 at 6:23 P.M. EDT

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  • Mike Doran
    is the fall equinox. The tropics, as you know, contain warm waters and the warmer saltwater is, the more conductive it becomes and, of course, after a summer
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 16 10:56 AM
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      is the fall equinox.




      The tropics, as you know, contain warm waters and the warmer
      saltwater is, the more conductive it becomes and, of course, after a
      summer of heating, the oceans are at their warmest in the northern
      hemisphere.

      However, the ionosphere heats up relatively instantly--it doesn't
      take a season to heat up. Nor does it take a season for ozone to be
      created in the ionosphere. It happens quickly. But it happens
      relative to the tilt of the earth in relation to the sun. In the fall
      and spring, again, how the ionosphere behaves is maximized to the
      tropics--with the fall carrying the most intense capacitive couplings
      as the oceand have heated up. And there the ionosphere couples with
      the tropics, which are warm and conductive, to most dramatically
      impact cloud microphysics. It is no wonder that the peak of the
      hurricane season in in the FALL and not the summer! Likewise, we get
      spring storms for a REASON!!! So, when you are talking about the
      solar flaring cycle and so forth, there are some rather complex
      things, electrically, that are going on. It's not as straight forward
      as you may think.



      Floridians have LONG known about hurricanes coming in the fall:

      http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Olympus/3457/CRiv [...]



      quote:
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      There has been speculation that the stones are placed in alignment
      with the soltice and equinox making it an astronomical site.

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    • David
      ... For reasons that scientists aren t entirely sure of, aurora and gepomagnetic storms are more likely to occur at or near the spring and fall equinox.
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 17 9:04 PM
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        > So, when you are talking about the
        > solar flaring cycle and so forth, there are some rather complex
        > things, electrically, that are going on. It's not as straight forward
        > as you may think.
        >

        For reasons that scientists aren't entirely sure of, aurora and
        gepomagnetic storms are more likely to occur at or near the spring and
        fall equinox.
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