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Re: [Methane Hydrate Club] Re: Last night zero strikes

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  • narodaleahcim@aol.com
    In a message dated 1/26/2005 8:30:34 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, ... If memory serves, Andrew was also a fairly compact storm. I wonder if that s an inherent
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 26, 2005
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      In a message dated 1/26/2005 8:30:34 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
      b1blancer1@... writes:



      > For all its severity, Charley was a small hurricane, with the
      > smallest eye -- five miles wide -- ever to hit the United States,
      > Salladé said.
      >

      If memory serves, Andrew was also a fairly compact storm. I wonder if
      that's an inherent property of the "super hurricanes." Do you have
      any information on Camille's size?


      But at the same time Charley had electrically connected to it a HUGE amount
      of convection to cause 60k+ strikes in three hours. In order to produce the
      huge displacement currents that cause the microphysics of clouds to go that
      asymmetrical and organize by the point or sphere of charge to low pressure
      center, there has to be huge currents. The eye is what we are talking
      about--and I suspect that an eye that is small like that cannot hold form long. The
      largest eye ever recorded was in the Pacific--about 200 miles across. Isabel
      was 25 to 50 miles across.

      Andrew also wasn't small in the eye--with FIVE mesovortices as it crossed
      Florida. It's the mesovortices that did all the wind damage. Imagine five
      tornadoes connected with each other 20 miles across--buzz sawing across
      Florida--hardly small if you are near the teeth.


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