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Re: Ivan landfalls

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  • David
    ... The GOES satellite eclipses actually only happen around the spring and fall equinox periods. During other times of the year, the GOES orbit geometries are
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 16, 2004
      --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, mike@u... wrote:
      > If you have been following the landfall of the hurricane you may have
      > wondered what happened to the eye on radar and where the satellite
      > pictures went. This time of night the satallite shots go down
      > literally because there is an eclypse of the GOES satallite's solar
      > panals that send the images back down to earth.

      The GOES satellite eclipses actually only happen around the spring and
      fall equinox periods. During other times of the year, the GOES orbit
      geometries are such that they don't have that problem.

      At any rate, I did manage to find one satellite image of landfalling Ivan.

      http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Tropical/Gulf_Mexico/2004/TRCIvan260_G12L.jpg
    • mike@usinter.net
      Yes, I saw that. The first page image is of Ivan flooding inland. What is interesting is in the tail feeder band that extends all the way to Galvanston Texas
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 17, 2004
        Yes, I saw that. The first page image is of Ivan flooding inland.
        What is interesting is in the tail feeder band that extends all the
        way to Galvanston Texas from Florida, there is an 'eye' in the tail.
        (The image was created as a joke for a friend). That eye and low are
        not the same, because warm saltwater is much more conductive than
        land, and a capacitive coupling occurs between ionosphere and Gulf,
        but not over the low. Such is the dynamics of landfalling eyewall
        dynamics.

        And such was the dynamic of Allison, which sat as a low over Texas,
        but still electrically kept the WGOM full of high cirrus and feeder
        bands.


        > At any rate, I did manage to find one satellite image of
        landfalling Ivan.
        >
        >
        http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Tropical/Gulf_Mexico/2004/TRCIvan260_G
        12L.jpg
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