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Ivan landfalls

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  • mike@usinter.net
    If you have been following the landfall of the hurricane you may have wondered what happened to the eye on radar and where the satellite pictures went. This
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 16, 2004
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      If you have been following the landfall of the hurricane you may have
      wondered what happened to the eye on radar and where the satellite
      pictures went. This time of night the satallite shots go down
      literally because there is an eclypse of the GOES satallite's solar
      panals that send the images back down to earth. Shortly we will see
      shots, but only on radar are images available, and due to the
      curvature of the earth, the radar range is limited. Let me suggest
      what you would have seen. Once much of the storm comes ashore the
      bands begin to compress and really behave much like super cells, one
      after another, churning around the low. However, on the ocean side,
      you continue to have the very large voltage transiants in the eye and
      eye area. However, the symmetry is no longer circular, because even
      with a perfectly round eye, it doesn't couple to the ocean and then
      over land like it would to the south end of the storm. Therefore,
      half moon slivers of open space between the eye and the south aspect
      of the storm actually conforms to the capactive coupling. Put
      another way, there is a lack of clouds because near the storm center
      there is a very strong DC field that causes any cloud parasols trying
      to turn to water and then ice to stretch out and compared to water in
      the storm disk/bands, where water vapor turns to water then ice more
      effectively, you have the storm organize. A storm is not 'chaos' and
      explosive random disorder, but rather is extreme order of cloud
      microphysics, and the eyewall replacement cycles are about
      maintaining electrical and thermodynamic orders. This is critical to
      understand not just how a hurricane works, which is just an academic
      exercise, but because a living earth evolved from these dynamics, it
      is critical to appreciate how ecology ties in, how life as a whole
      ties in. For me out here in California, it's dry as a popcorn fart.
      That's another side of the same ecological issue. And the ultimate
      ecological issue is the fact that the earth's EMF is slowly
      shrinking, which means it is slowly becoming more valnerable to the
      solar winds wisking the atmosphere away.

      http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/2004/drmon.gif


      http://www.sciam.com/media/inline/000A3C38-C656-1C71-
      9EB7809EC588F2D7_arch1.gif
    • David
      ... The GOES satellite eclipses actually only happen around the spring and fall equinox periods. During other times of the year, the GOES orbit geometries are
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 16, 2004
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        --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, mike@u... wrote:
        > If you have been following the landfall of the hurricane you may have
        > wondered what happened to the eye on radar and where the satellite
        > pictures went. This time of night the satallite shots go down
        > literally because there is an eclypse of the GOES satallite's solar
        > panals that send the images back down to earth.

        The GOES satellite eclipses actually only happen around the spring and
        fall equinox periods. During other times of the year, the GOES orbit
        geometries are such that they don't have that problem.

        At any rate, I did manage to find one satellite image of landfalling Ivan.

        http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Tropical/Gulf_Mexico/2004/TRCIvan260_G12L.jpg
      • mike@usinter.net
        Yes, I saw that. The first page image is of Ivan flooding inland. What is interesting is in the tail feeder band that extends all the way to Galvanston Texas
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 17, 2004
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          Yes, I saw that. The first page image is of Ivan flooding inland.
          What is interesting is in the tail feeder band that extends all the
          way to Galvanston Texas from Florida, there is an 'eye' in the tail.
          (The image was created as a joke for a friend). That eye and low are
          not the same, because warm saltwater is much more conductive than
          land, and a capacitive coupling occurs between ionosphere and Gulf,
          but not over the low. Such is the dynamics of landfalling eyewall
          dynamics.

          And such was the dynamic of Allison, which sat as a low over Texas,
          but still electrically kept the WGOM full of high cirrus and feeder
          bands.


          > At any rate, I did manage to find one satellite image of
          landfalling Ivan.
          >
          >
          http://www.osei.noaa.gov/Events/Tropical/Gulf_Mexico/2004/TRCIvan260_G
          12L.jpg
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