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See you on the dark side of the moon

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  • mike@usinter.net
    Ken Ring, a former New Zealand maths teacher, may be a very clever weather watcher. Or perhaps he is just lucky. On July 13 the Herald reported the bold tip of
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 22 12:40 PM
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      Ken Ring, a former New Zealand maths teacher, may be a very clever
      weather watcher. Or perhaps he is just lucky.

      On July 13 the Herald reported the bold tip of the long-range weather
      forecaster from Auckland, who calls himself the "moon man". On
      Saturday, August 14, Sydney's skies would open. "It will be the start
      of a week of rain ... It will rain right through to the 20th," he
      said

      But the weather bureau suggested yesterday that his success in
      predicting this week's rain had more to do with chance than
      science. "One out of one is not statistically significant," a
      spokeswoman said, adding that Mr Ring's forecasts would "need
      verification over years. I think we'll wait and see."

      Mr Ring said yesterday that there was more rain on the way, although
      not for another month or so. "The next lot will begin on September
      23."

      Sydney Morning Herald

      http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/08/20/1092972748463.html?
      oneclick=true

      Comment:

      Moon gravity waves cause roilings and GAS EXCHANGE increases in
      CONDUCTIVITIES. GAS EXCHANGE is about CO2! So is life. In the oceans,
      conductivity and life have been tied together even before there was
      cellular life. And the moon roiling the oceans and gas exchanges and
      nucleotides in parasols have been so tied--as a feedback merely has
      to then passively increase rainfall and follow up storms and sort the
      solution from the nucleotides that fall back down as rain, not cause
      the storm directly.

      +++++++++++

      The world is quickly running out of oil and there are no more great
      oil fields to find. The clock is ticking and the doomsday nightmare
      is quickly approaching

      Is there a master plan out there to forestall this impeding economic
      meltdown?

      In January 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy estimated the world's
      supply of unexploited oil reserves the world supply of oil will be
      totally exhausted 35 years from now (June 2003).

      http://members.aol.com/mpwright9/oil.html

      For its part, OPEC now expects global oil consumption this year to
      reach 81.18 million barrels a day , up 280,000 barrels from an
      earlier estimate.

      http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/20/business/20CND

      Total oil resources (both discovered and undiscovered, excluding oil
      already produced) are 2,311 Billion Barrels.

      http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/iea/table82.html ).

      If all the oil will be gone in 35 years at current consumption rates
      then with even a modest growth when will it run out?

      When supply and demand forces the price of oil above $100 a barrel we
      will see a world wide economic depression that dwarfs the American
      depression of the 1920's.
    • David
      ... When I do the math, I come up with about 1.04 trillion barrels over next 35 years, based upon the 81.18 billion/day consumption rate. That s less than half
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 23 8:16 PM
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        > If all the oil will be gone in 35 years at current consumption rates
        > then with even a modest growth when will it run out?
        >

        When I do the math, I come up with about 1.04 trillion barrels over
        next 35 years, based upon the 81.18 billion/day consumption rate.
        That's less than half of the figure you gave for the estimated reserves!

        > When supply and demand forces the price of oil above $100 a barrel we
        > will see a world wide economic depression that dwarfs the American
        > depression of the 1920's.

        You're assuming that there won't be any new technologies developed in
        the next 35 years, which I don't see as a viable assumption.
        Necessity is the mother of invention. If and when the price of oil
        becomes too expensive to be economicially viable, you can bet there
        will be new technologies.
      • mike@usinter.net
        Oops. It s millions, not billions. I just cut and pasted it, so it wasn t my mistake :) ... rates ... reserves! ... barrel we ... American ... in
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 24 1:07 AM
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          Oops. It's millions, not billions. I just cut and pasted it, so it
          wasn't my mistake :)

          --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "David" <b1blancer1@e...>
          wrote:
          >
          > > If all the oil will be gone in 35 years at current consumption
          rates
          > > then with even a modest growth when will it run out?
          > >
          >
          > When I do the math, I come up with about 1.04 trillion barrels over
          > next 35 years, based upon the 81.18 billion/day consumption rate.
          > That's less than half of the figure you gave for the estimated
          reserves!
          >
          > > When supply and demand forces the price of oil above $100 a
          barrel we
          > > will see a world wide economic depression that dwarfs the
          American
          > > depression of the 1920's.
          >
          > You're assuming that there won't be any new technologies developed
          in
          > the next 35 years, which I don't see as a viable assumption.
          > Necessity is the mother of invention. If and when the price of oil
          > becomes too expensive to be economicially viable, you can bet there
          > will be new technologies.
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