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Re: Solar Activity Report for 8/4/04

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  • XK SAZ
    WOW that is so cool. Thats like telling where an island is on the other side of a planet just from water waves. ... They posted this article on spicules not
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 6 1:01 PM
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      WOW that is so cool. Thats like telling where an island is on the
      other side of a planet just from water waves.

      >http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/star_quakes_40728.html
      They posted this article on spicules not too long ago. Imagine how
      loud it would be if the sound could get out!




      >
      >Message: 2
      > Date: Fri, 06 Aug 2004 12:00:28 -0000
      > From: "David" <b1blancer1@...>
      >Subject: Re: Solar Activity Report for 8/4/04
      >
      >--- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "XK SAZ" <swezlex1@y...> wrote:
      >> How do you tell it is holding together on the back side of the sun??
      >>
      >
      >I just look at the SOHO satellite images on SPACEWEATHER.COM! Ohh,
      >I'll bet you meant how can anybody tell, didn't you? ;-)
      >
      >The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft has an
      >instrument on board called the Michelson-Doppler Imager (MDI). The
      >MDI can detect movements in the "surface" of the sun. Now obviously,
      >the sun doesn't have a solid surface. When I say "surface," I really
      >mean what we see as the visible surface, or the photosphere. Hold
      >that thought.
      >
      >Did you know the sun makes noise? It does. The sun is a vibrating
      >ball of sound waves. It isn't sound you could hear, though. The
      >sound waves that travel though the sun have a period of around 5
      >minutes. The sound we humans hear have a period much, much shorter
      >than that. Still, though, it is sound, albeit it as very low
      >frequency. Enter the field of study known as helioseismology. In
      >much the same way that terrestrial scientists use the vibrations of
      >earthquakes to probe the Earth's interior, solar scientists can do the
      >same thing for the sun.
      >
      >Now obviously, you can't put any detection equipment on the sun, so
      >how do they do that? By analyzing the movements in the photospere
      >that the sound waves cause. Remember the MDI?
      >
      >Now for the sunspot part. It is known that intense magnetic fields on
      >the sun, such as those associated with sunspots, cause variations in
      >the way that sound waves travel through the sun. By analyzing
      >photosphere movements with SOHO's MDI instrument, scientists can tell
      >where the intense magnetic fields are on the other side of the sun.
      >Where you find strong magnetic fields, you'll find sunspots.
      >
      >The technology isn't perfect, but it does a pretty good job of
      >detecting large sunspots with strong magnetic fields. See this link
      >for more info : http://www.spaceweather.com/glossary/farside.html
      >
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