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Solar Activity Report for 8/4/04

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  • David
    Conditions remain quiet. Actually, they are very quiet, with an K index of 0! There are two sunspot regions visible. Region 655, which has grown a bit over
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 4 9:42 PM
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      Conditions remain quiet. Actually, they are very quiet, with an K
      index of 0! There are two sunspot regions visible. Region 655, which
      has grown a bit over the last day or so, has a small chance of
      producing a significant flare, but judging from the background X-ray
      flux plot, I wouldn't hold my breath. We could see a brief increase
      in the solar wind speed on the 7th due to the effects of a small
      coronal hole. The most interesting news right now is what we can't
      see directly. Sunspot region 649, which unleashed X-class flares the
      last time around, appears to be holding together during it's transit
      across the back side of the sun. It'll be coming back into view on or
      about the 7th, so stay tuned for that.

      The current solar and geomagnetic conditions are :

      NOAA sunspot number : 62
      SFI : 85
      A index : 5
      K index : 0

      Solar wind speed : 278.1 km/sec
      Solar wind density : 0.1 protons/cc
      Solar wind pressure : 0.1 nPa

      IMF : 3.2 nT
      IMF Orientation : 0.4 nT North

      GOES-12 Background X-ray Flux Level : A7

      Conditions for the last 24 hours :
      No space weather storms were observed for the past 24 hours.

      Forecast for the next 24 hours :
      No space weather storms are expected for the next 24 hours.

      Solar activity forecast :
      Solar activity is expected to be at very low levels.

      Geomagnetic activity forecast :
      The geomagnetic field is expected to be at quiet levels through 06
      Aug. Beginning on 07 Aug, periods of active levels are likely with a
      slight chance for an isolated active event due to the influence of a
      high speed solar wind stream.

      Recent significant solar flare activity :
      None
    • XK SAZ
      How do you tell it is holding together on the back side of the sun?? Sunspot region 649, which unleashed X-class flares the
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 5 11:53 AM
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        How do you tell it is holding together on the back side of the sun??


        Sunspot region 649, which unleashed X-class flares the
        > last time around, appears to be holding together during it's transit
        > across the back side of the sun. It'll be coming back into view on or
        > about the 7th, so stay tuned for that.
      • David
        ... I just look at the SOHO satellite images on SPACEWEATHER.COM! Ohh, I ll bet you meant how can anybody tell, didn t you? ;-) The Solar and Heliospheric
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 6 5:00 AM
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          --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "XK SAZ" <swezlex1@y...> wrote:
          > How do you tell it is holding together on the back side of the sun??
          >

          I just look at the SOHO satellite images on SPACEWEATHER.COM! Ohh,
          I'll bet you meant how can anybody tell, didn't you? ;-)

          The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft has an
          instrument on board called the Michelson-Doppler Imager (MDI). The
          MDI can detect movements in the "surface" of the sun. Now obviously,
          the sun doesn't have a solid surface. When I say "surface," I really
          mean what we see as the visible surface, or the photosphere. Hold
          that thought.

          Did you know the sun makes noise? It does. The sun is a vibrating
          ball of sound waves. It isn't sound you could hear, though. The
          sound waves that travel though the sun have a period of around 5
          minutes. The sound we humans hear have a period much, much shorter
          than that. Still, though, it is sound, albeit it as very low
          frequency. Enter the field of study known as helioseismology. In
          much the same way that terrestrial scientists use the vibrations of
          earthquakes to probe the Earth's interior, solar scientists can do the
          same thing for the sun.

          Now obviously, you can't put any detection equipment on the sun, so
          how do they do that? By analyzing the movements in the photospere
          that the sound waves cause. Remember the MDI?

          Now for the sunspot part. It is known that intense magnetic fields on
          the sun, such as those associated with sunspots, cause variations in
          the way that sound waves travel through the sun. By analyzing
          photosphere movements with SOHO's MDI instrument, scientists can tell
          where the intense magnetic fields are on the other side of the sun.
          Where you find strong magnetic fields, you'll find sunspots.

          The technology isn't perfect, but it does a pretty good job of
          detecting large sunspots with strong magnetic fields. See this link
          for more info : http://www.spaceweather.com/glossary/farside.html
        • XK SAZ
          WOW that is so cool. Thats like telling where an island is on the other side of a planet just from water waves. ... They posted this article on spicules not
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 6 1:01 PM
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            WOW that is so cool. Thats like telling where an island is on the
            other side of a planet just from water waves.

            >http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/star_quakes_40728.html
            They posted this article on spicules not too long ago. Imagine how
            loud it would be if the sound could get out!




            >
            >Message: 2
            > Date: Fri, 06 Aug 2004 12:00:28 -0000
            > From: "David" <b1blancer1@...>
            >Subject: Re: Solar Activity Report for 8/4/04
            >
            >--- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "XK SAZ" <swezlex1@y...> wrote:
            >> How do you tell it is holding together on the back side of the sun??
            >>
            >
            >I just look at the SOHO satellite images on SPACEWEATHER.COM! Ohh,
            >I'll bet you meant how can anybody tell, didn't you? ;-)
            >
            >The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) spacecraft has an
            >instrument on board called the Michelson-Doppler Imager (MDI). The
            >MDI can detect movements in the "surface" of the sun. Now obviously,
            >the sun doesn't have a solid surface. When I say "surface," I really
            >mean what we see as the visible surface, or the photosphere. Hold
            >that thought.
            >
            >Did you know the sun makes noise? It does. The sun is a vibrating
            >ball of sound waves. It isn't sound you could hear, though. The
            >sound waves that travel though the sun have a period of around 5
            >minutes. The sound we humans hear have a period much, much shorter
            >than that. Still, though, it is sound, albeit it as very low
            >frequency. Enter the field of study known as helioseismology. In
            >much the same way that terrestrial scientists use the vibrations of
            >earthquakes to probe the Earth's interior, solar scientists can do the
            >same thing for the sun.
            >
            >Now obviously, you can't put any detection equipment on the sun, so
            >how do they do that? By analyzing the movements in the photospere
            >that the sound waves cause. Remember the MDI?
            >
            >Now for the sunspot part. It is known that intense magnetic fields on
            >the sun, such as those associated with sunspots, cause variations in
            >the way that sound waves travel through the sun. By analyzing
            >photosphere movements with SOHO's MDI instrument, scientists can tell
            >where the intense magnetic fields are on the other side of the sun.
            >Where you find strong magnetic fields, you'll find sunspots.
            >
            >The technology isn't perfect, but it does a pretty good job of
            >detecting large sunspots with strong magnetic fields. See this link
            >for more info : http://www.spaceweather.com/glossary/farside.html
            >
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