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Re: Two West Pac storms over ocean already 'tilled' by previous storms

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  • David
    ... You raise a very interesting point. If Venus does have a magnetic field, it is a very weak one that has so far escaped detection. It does have what is
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 4, 2004
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      > Some would think it is luck, like
      > falling between Venus and Mars, but I know these things are not by
      > chance over many transactions and many changes. There is a law of
      > large numbers to consider, plus the fact that Venus somehow has
      > avoided its atmosphere getting whisked away like what has occurrd on
      > Mars.
      >

      You raise a very interesting point. If Venus does have a magnetic
      field, it is a very weak one that has so far escaped detection. It
      does have what is known as an induced magnetosphere, which is caused
      by direct interaction of the solar wind with Venus' ionosphere. That
      doesn't happen here on Earth, because out magnetic field protects us.

      No seismic data is available for Venus, so we really don't know what
      Venus' core is like, although density data for Venus derived from
      spacecraft observations suggest that Venus' core is probably similar
      in size to Earth's. However, it must be different in some way,
      because there is no magnetic field being generated. Perhaps Venus'
      core has become completely solid, or maybe completely liquid. Earth,
      of course, has a liquid outer and solid inner core.

      Even though Venus doesn't have an Earth-like plate tectonic system, it
      does have numerous volcanoes, which replenish Venus' atmosphere fast
      enough to compensate for the erosive effects of the solar wind. By
      some estimates, Venus maye have over 100,000 active volcanoes. That's
      the big difference between Venus and Mars. Venus has active volcanoes
      to replenish the atmosphere. Mars doesn't.

      With all of the active volcanoes blowing out gas, Venus' astmosphere
      became denser. Life might have been able to process out some of the
      CO2 out of Venus' atmosphere, but life on Venus probably didn't get a
      chance to start before it was too late and too hot.
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