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Re: Hurricanes help the ocean bloom

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  • mike@usinter.net
    Really cool article. I think it is only a matter of time before these macrobiological behaviors start to become more generally recognized as the gaia we re
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 18, 2004
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      Really cool article. I think it is only a matter of time before
      these macrobiological behaviors start to become more generally
      recognized as the gaia we're describing here at this club. Just
      think, our science here might be two or three years ahead of the
      mainstream's!

      --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "David" <b1blancer1@e...>
      wrote:
      > RELEASE: 04-193
      >
      > NASA DATA SHOWS HURRICANES HELP PLANTS BLOOM IN "OCEAN DESERTS"
      >
      > Whenever a hurricane races across the Atlantic Ocean, chances are
      > phytoplankton will bloom behind it. According to a new study using
      > NASA satellite data, these phytoplankton blooms may also affect the
      > Earth's climate and carbon cycle.
      >
      > Dr. Steven Babin, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins University
      Applied
      > Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md., studied 13 North Atlantic
      > hurricanes between 1998 and 2001. Ocean color data from the SeaWiFS
      > instrument on the SeaStar satellite were used to analyze levels of
      > chlorophyll, the green pigment in plants. The satellite images
      showed
      > tiny microscopic ocean plants, called phytoplankton, bloomed
      > following the storms.
      >
      > "Some parts of the ocean are like deserts, because there isn't
      enough
      > food for many plants to grow. A hurricane's high winds stir up the
      > ocean waters and help bring nutrients and phytoplankton to the
      > surface, where they get more sunlight, allowing the plants to
      bloom,"
      > Babin said.
      >
      > Previous research has relied largely on sporadic, incomplete data
      from
      > ships to understand how and when near-surface phytoplankton bloom.
      > "This effect of hurricanes in ocean deserts has not been seen
      before.
      > We believe it is the first documented satellite observation of this
      > phenomenon in the wake of hurricanes," Babin noted. "Because 1998
      was
      > the first complete Atlantic hurricane season observed by this
      > instrument, we first noticed this effect in late 1998 after looking
      at
      > hurricane Bonnie," Babin said.
      >
      > The study found the physical make-up of a storm, including its size,
      > strength and forward speed, is directly related to the amount of
      > phytoplankton that blooms. Bigger storms appear to cause larger
      > phytoplankton blooms. Larger phytoplankton should have more
      > chlorophyll, which satellite sensors can see.
      >
      > Hurricane-induced upwelling, the rising of cooler nutrient-rich
      water
      > to the ocean surface, is also critical in phytoplankton growth. For
      > two to three weeks following almost every storm, the satellite data
      > showed phytoplankton growth. Babin and his colleagues believe it was
      > stimulated by the addition of nutrients brought up to the surface.
      >
      > Whenever the quantity of plants increases or decreases, it affects
      the
      > amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. As phytoplankton grow,
      > they absorb carbon dioxide, a heat-trapping greenhouse gas. The gas
      is
      > carried to the ocean floor as a carbon form when the tiny plants
      die.
      > This enables atmospheric carbon to get into the deep ocean. It is
      one
      > of several natural processes that contribute to Earth's carbon
      cycle.
      >
      > By stimulating these phytoplankton blooms, hurricanes can affect the
      > ecology of the upper ocean. Phytoplankton is at the bottom of the
      food
      > chain. The factors that influence their growth also directly affect
      > the animals and organisms that feed on them. In addition, since
      > climate-related phenomena like El Niño may change the frequency and
      > intensity of hurricanes, storm-induced biological activity may have
      > even greater contributions to future climate change.
      >
      > Scientists are still trying to determine how much carbon dioxide
      might
      > be removed from such a process. "Better knowledge of the carbon
      cycle
      > will improve our understanding of global ecology and how climate
      > change might affect us," Babin said.
      >
      > The research appeared as a paper in a recent issue of the Journal of
      > Geophysical Research-Oceans. Study co-authors include J.A. Carton,
      > University of Maryland, College Park, Md.; T.D. Dickey, Ocean
      Physics
      > Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, Calif.; and
      J.D.
      > Wiggert, Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Old Dominion
      > University, Norfolk, Va.
      >
      > NASA's Earth Science Enterprise funded part of the research. The
      > Enterprise is dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrated
      > system and applying Earth System Science to improve climate,
      weather,
      > and natural hazard prediction using the unique vantage point of
      space.
      >
      > For information and images about this research on the Internet,
      visit:
      >
      > http://www.gsfc.nasa.gov/topstory/2004/0602hurricanebloom.htm
    • David
      ... Does that mean somebody will give us a bunch of money? ;-)
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 18, 2004
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        --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, mike@u... wrote:
        > Really cool article. I think it is only a matter of time before
        > these macrobiological behaviors start to become more generally
        > recognized as the gaia we're describing here at this club. Just
        > think, our science here might be two or three years ahead of the
        > mainstream's!
        >

        Does that mean somebody will give us a bunch of money? ;-)
      • Steve Dodd
        ... I gather the normal procedure is for people to rip off your work without giving you any credit at all.. because if you re not working for some vast
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 19, 2004
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          On Sat, Jun 19, 2004 at 05:10:48AM -0000, David wrote:
          > --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, mike@u... wrote:

          > > Really cool article. I think it is only a matter of time before
          > > these macrobiological behaviors start to become more generally
          > > recognized as the gaia we're describing here at this club. Just
          > > think, our science here might be two or three years ahead of the
          > > mainstream's!

          > Does that mean somebody will give us a bunch of money? ;-)

          I gather the normal procedure is for people to rip off your work without
          giving you any credit at all.. because if you're not working for some
          vast bureaucratic research foundation, you can't possibly know what
          you're talking about, can you?

          <s>, having a "cynical moment"

          --
          Home+FOAF: http://www.loth.org.uk/ * PGP: 201A57B6 * Original portions
          © 2004 Steve Dodd * "I'm not falling apart, I'm coming together." *
          Appreciated this message? - http://www.loth.org.uk/tipjar/ * PNAMBC *

          "If you don't pay your exorcist, you get repossessed."
        • mike@usinter.net
          In a sense all greatness extends from the visions upon giant s shoulders. It is hardly insulting to me if we were giants in our day. ... before ... Just ...
          Message 4 of 7 , Jun 20, 2004
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            In a sense all greatness extends from the visions upon giant's
            shoulders. It is hardly insulting to me if we were giants in our day.

            --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, Steve Dodd <steved@l...>
            wrote:
            > On Sat, Jun 19, 2004 at 05:10:48AM -0000, David wrote:
            > > --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, mike@u... wrote:
            >
            > > > Really cool article. I think it is only a matter of time
            before
            > > > these macrobiological behaviors start to become more generally
            > > > recognized as the gaia we're describing here at this club.
            Just
            > > > think, our science here might be two or three years ahead of
            the
            > > > mainstream's!
            >
            > > Does that mean somebody will give us a bunch of money? ;-)
            >
            > I gather the normal procedure is for people to rip off your work
            without
            > giving you any credit at all.. because if you're not working for
            some
            > vast bureaucratic research foundation, you can't possibly know what
            > you're talking about, can you?
            >
            > <s>, having a "cynical moment"
            >
            > --
            > Home+FOAF: http://www.loth.org.uk/ * PGP: 201A57B6 * Original
            portions
            > © 2004 Steve Dodd * "I'm not falling apart, I'm coming
            together." *
            > Appreciated this message? - http://www.loth.org.uk/tipjar/ *
            PNAMBC *
            >
            > "If you don't pay your exorcist, you get repossessed."
          • Steve Dodd
            ... This is true.. I guess there s a difference between wanting ackowledgement as egoboo , and just wanting to be kept in the loop about future developments..
            Message 5 of 7 , Jun 21, 2004
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              On Sun, Jun 20, 2004 at 11:24:40PM -0000, mike@... wrote:

              > In a sense all greatness extends from the visions upon giant's
              > shoulders. It is hardly insulting to me if we were giants in our day.

              This is true.. I guess there's a difference between wanting
              ackowledgement as "egoboo", and just wanting to be kept in the loop
              about future developments..

              BTW, have you ever seen the Organelle website? It's intriguing - the
              language can be a little dense in a places, but definitely worth making
              an effort over IMHO:

              Organelle
              <http://www.organelle.org/>

              --
              Home+FOAF: http://www.loth.org.uk/ * PGP: 201A57B6 * Original portions
              © 2004 Steve Dodd * "I'm not falling apart, I'm coming together." *
              Appreciated this message? - http://www.loth.org.uk/tipjar/ * PNAMBC *

              "We take the very best of what people do, synthesise it down, make it
              learnable and share it with each other - and that is what the real
              future of what NLP will be and its gonna stay that way!"
              -- Richard Bandler
            • mike@usinter.net
              What s interesting about that site is like Dave and I have been posting with his focus on the sun and my focus on the earth, and hence looking at an
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 21, 2004
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                What's interesting about that site is like Dave and I have been
                posting with his focus on the sun and my focus on the earth, and
                hence looking at an interaction between the two celestial bodies from
                a different perspective. A perspective that is fundimentally about
                thermodynamics--from an electrical and biological view.

                Even the topic of hydrates has not been seen by the research
                communicty as electrical (gas exchange and direct current
                resistances) and macro biological . . . and the hydrate role in both
                aspects are probably one of the most fundimental in abiogenesis.
                This, I suppose, has further focused our group and made it what it
                is, realtime cutting edge science that has universiality in its
                themes and cross topics.

                --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, Steve Dodd <steved@l...>
                wrote:
                > On Sun, Jun 20, 2004 at 11:24:40PM -0000, mike@u... wrote:
                >
                > > In a sense all greatness extends from the visions upon giant's
                > > shoulders. It is hardly insulting to me if we were giants in our
                day.
                >
                > This is true.. I guess there's a difference between wanting
                > ackowledgement as "egoboo", and just wanting to be kept in the loop
                > about future developments..
                >
                > BTW, have you ever seen the Organelle website? It's intriguing - the
                > language can be a little dense in a places, but definitely worth
                making
                > an effort over IMHO:
                >
                > Organelle
                > <http://www.organelle.org/>
                >
                > --
                > Home+FOAF: http://www.loth.org.uk/ * PGP: 201A57B6 * Original
                portions
                > © 2004 Steve Dodd * "I'm not falling apart, I'm coming
                together." *
                > Appreciated this message? - http://www.loth.org.uk/tipjar/ *
                PNAMBC *
                >
                > "We take the very best of what people do, synthesise it down, make
                it
                > learnable and share it with each other - and that is what the real
                > future of what NLP will be and its gonna stay that way!"
                > -- Richard Bandler
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