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Re: Fires in California

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  • David
    ... This part confuses me, Mike. Can you describe the mechanism by which electrons cause cloud amplification? I m familiar with the theory that says cosmic
    Message 1 of 3 , May 7, 2004
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      > At the same time, there is the earth EMF. The one of interest is just
      > about at the north end of Hudson Bay. There is another node north of
      > Europe, but it's enough to talk about this node at this time. What
      > that node does is bring the solar wind particles, in this case
      > electrons (The north pole is like a south pole in a bar magnet, or
      > one that has a positive orientation. Therefore, solar winds with a
      > negative charge or electrons, will be attracted to the closing
      > isobars of that pole). Those electrons then cause a wave of clouds
      > that are amplified, moving south. This is all about signal noise, in
      > other words, about how the weak currents of the solar wind may or may
      > not produce cloud patterns, since the dielectric of water is about 80
      > times that of air, and the charges separated out by thunderstorm
      > activity is a much more powerful current compared to that solar wind.
      >

      This part confuses me, Mike. Can you describe the mechanism by which
      electrons cause cloud amplification? I'm familiar with the theory
      that says cosmic rays can influence low cloud formation, but cosmic
      rays, actually being heavy ion nuclei generated by supernovas, are
      vastly larger and more massive than electrons.

      To be accurate, the solar wind never penetrates beyond Earth's
      magnetosphere. That's one reason why we still have an atmosphere and
      Mars doesn't, or at least not much of one. What happens when the
      Earth's magnetosphere is hit by a solar wind gust or CME is that
      electrons are accelerated down Earth's magnetic field lines. These
      are not electrons from the solar wind, however. Rather, they are
      electrons that are trapped "in storage" by the magnetic field. They
      orbit around the magnetic field lines, at an angle 90 degrees offset
      from the field line direction. The incoming solar wind blast somehow
      knock loose the electrons, and down they come along the magnetic field
      lines.

      The exact mechanism by which this occurs, and exactly how aurora are
      tied to magnetic field disturbances, isn't clearly understood. In
      fact, NASA is launching 5 satellites in 2007 as part of the THEMIS
      program, which will hopefully help answer these questions.

      http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/themis/mission.html

      http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2003/mar/HP_news_c03h.html
    • David
      And by the way, when I first came to this club, I was very, very sceptical of the whole idea of an electrical influence on climate. I must admit, however,
      Message 2 of 3 , May 7, 2004
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        And by the way, when I first came to this club, I was very, very
        sceptical of the whole idea of an electrical influence on climate. I
        must admit, however, that you have presented some compelling evidence.
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