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Fires in California

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  • mike@usinter.net
    Looks like another banner fire season for California and the west. The fire season normally doesn t start for 4 more weeks but we decided to start it early
    Message 1 of 3 , May 5, 2004
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      Looks like another banner fire season for California and the west.
      The fire season normally doesn't start for 4 more weeks but we
      decided to start it early this year. All these effects of a warming
      of only 0.7C are pretty impressive. Boy just think what another 2.0C
      will do. 4.0C???

      About 12 years ago I had my first jury trial in Corona where the
      fires are burning.

      The weather/climate and legal history there is very important to our
      discussion on tropical storms, it turns out. Just south of Corona is
      a 'lake' called the Sultan Sea. It was created 100 years ago when the
      Colorado burst a levy. The past 100 years has been a history of
      gerrymandering the Colorado, and the result is nothing actually flows
      into the Colorado's delta. The long inlet there is called the Sea of
      Cortez or Gulf of California. It is extremely ELECTRICALLY
      significant as far as a flow of the so called sub tropical jet
      stream, which can bring moisture from the tropics to the southwestern
      US. Corona typically gets monsoonal thunderstorms, particularly at
      elevations, but that isn't as much the case anymore, as obviously
      it's dry. The SW is in the midst of an 1,800 drought. Since then I
      have moved northwest to Redding, and I have lived the patterns and am
      starting to understand them--what happens electrically. I also have
      spent some time in Colorado, Oklahoma and Texas, where two sisters
      and two bothers have lived.

      The best way to understand what is occurring is to consider central
      Africa. That is the most struck place in the world, and also the
      place where our CV seasoon begins to bring us waves. But for purposes
      of this discusion, it is also electrically proximate to the Sahara
      desert.

      As some of you may well know, at one point not so long ago the Sahara
      was green--a savanah, not a desert. The change from grasslands to
      desert, or the desertification, took about 300 years. Previously,
      this change has been blamed on the Milankovitch cycle, which is a
      cycle about the radiative balances that income to places on earth
      given its tilt, orbit and wobble. As many of you are aware, I
      consider Milankovitch important but only part of the complex picture
      that includes not just the radiation that comes to different places,
      but also how that radiation is patterned relative to the electrical
      particles that come from the sun. IOWs that the sun is both radiative
      AND electrical, and that is what the macrobiosphere must deal with to
      produce living conditions not just for the Sahara but for the whole
      of the biosphere.

      Central Africa, struck with lightning as much as it is, causes
      incredibly huge positive charges in the lower ionosphere just south
      of the Sahara. Since there is a very warm and salty Mediterranean Sea
      that is uniformly conductive for general lack of microbial life, that
      positive charge ends up coupling quite strongly with that Sea and
      between the electrons on the surface of the Sea and the protons
      concentrated in the lower ionosphere, any ice attempting to form in
      between these largescale fields elongates and forms slowly in
      relation to the thunderstorms rolling across central Africa.
      Therefore, what little water in the air ends up diffusing south to
      those storms, and the desert gets very little rainfall.

      Likewise, in the west, they have a similar problem. Thunderstorms in
      the so called tornado alley create huge displacement currents between
      the Pacific Ocean and the west coast. If you take a look at a Pacific
      sat shot right now you will see the clouds running full on north to
      Canada.

      That's because, again, there is a very strong positive current in the
      ionosphere along the coast, created from the east, and the ocean ends
      up with electrons on the surface, and water then diffuses away, and a
      high pressure area forms. This pushes fronts north.

      At the same time, there is the earth EMF. The one of interest is just
      about at the north end of Hudson Bay. There is another node north of
      Europe, but it's enough to talk about this node at this time. What
      that node does is bring the solar wind particles, in this case
      electrons (The north pole is like a south pole in a bar magnet, or
      one that has a positive orientation. Therefore, solar winds with a
      negative charge or electrons, will be attracted to the closing
      isobars of that pole). Those electrons then cause a wave of clouds
      that are amplified, moving south. This is all about signal noise, in
      other words, about how the weak currents of the solar wind may or may
      not produce cloud patterns, since the dielectric of water is about 80
      times that of air, and the charges separated out by thunderstorm
      activity is a much more powerful current compared to that solar wind.

      Lately, IMHO due to climate changes from CO2 not as much as a green
      house gas but from its conductivity property from gas exchange, that
      node over Hudson Bay has WEAKENED substantially. Likewise, with the
      Colorado River flowing or I should say NOT flowing to the Gulf of
      California, that wave of electrical conditions that can stretch from
      the Hudson Bay all the way to the Gulf of California has not been
      nearly as strong, and the result is poor moisture flow into this
      area. Colorado, Southern California, Arizona, Nevada, parts of the
      upper Midwest, have all suffered from drought.

      Later in the season, as the pattern sets in, it begins to impact the
      way tropical waves move in the Gulf of Mexico, which brings me to the
      Sultan Sea. While there are no records of tropical storms in the East
      Pacific from Unisys before WWII, if you look at turn of the last
      century tropical storms in the western Gulf of Mexico, they seem to
      have been reduced by Salton Sea disaster . . .

      Of course, on my mind isn't a hurricane in the Gulf of Mexico, but
      how a strong pattern change, a strong displacement current that is
      ongoing and coupling with the Pacific and the Gulf of California,
      could dry out the Southwest and make the Majove Desert extend from
      San Francisco to Mexico and then along the path of the sub tropical
      jet over Colorado and to the upper midwest . . .

      http://www.drought.unl.edu/dm/monitor.html
    • David
      ... This part confuses me, Mike. Can you describe the mechanism by which electrons cause cloud amplification? I m familiar with the theory that says cosmic
      Message 2 of 3 , May 7, 2004
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        > At the same time, there is the earth EMF. The one of interest is just
        > about at the north end of Hudson Bay. There is another node north of
        > Europe, but it's enough to talk about this node at this time. What
        > that node does is bring the solar wind particles, in this case
        > electrons (The north pole is like a south pole in a bar magnet, or
        > one that has a positive orientation. Therefore, solar winds with a
        > negative charge or electrons, will be attracted to the closing
        > isobars of that pole). Those electrons then cause a wave of clouds
        > that are amplified, moving south. This is all about signal noise, in
        > other words, about how the weak currents of the solar wind may or may
        > not produce cloud patterns, since the dielectric of water is about 80
        > times that of air, and the charges separated out by thunderstorm
        > activity is a much more powerful current compared to that solar wind.
        >

        This part confuses me, Mike. Can you describe the mechanism by which
        electrons cause cloud amplification? I'm familiar with the theory
        that says cosmic rays can influence low cloud formation, but cosmic
        rays, actually being heavy ion nuclei generated by supernovas, are
        vastly larger and more massive than electrons.

        To be accurate, the solar wind never penetrates beyond Earth's
        magnetosphere. That's one reason why we still have an atmosphere and
        Mars doesn't, or at least not much of one. What happens when the
        Earth's magnetosphere is hit by a solar wind gust or CME is that
        electrons are accelerated down Earth's magnetic field lines. These
        are not electrons from the solar wind, however. Rather, they are
        electrons that are trapped "in storage" by the magnetic field. They
        orbit around the magnetic field lines, at an angle 90 degrees offset
        from the field line direction. The incoming solar wind blast somehow
        knock loose the electrons, and down they come along the magnetic field
        lines.

        The exact mechanism by which this occurs, and exactly how aurora are
        tied to magnetic field disturbances, isn't clearly understood. In
        fact, NASA is launching 5 satellites in 2007 as part of the THEMIS
        program, which will hopefully help answer these questions.

        http://sprg.ssl.berkeley.edu/themis/mission.html

        http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2003/mar/HP_news_c03h.html
      • David
        And by the way, when I first came to this club, I was very, very sceptical of the whole idea of an electrical influence on climate. I must admit, however,
        Message 3 of 3 , May 7, 2004
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          And by the way, when I first came to this club, I was very, very
          sceptical of the whole idea of an electrical influence on climate. I
          must admit, however, that you have presented some compelling evidence.
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