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Re: alternatives

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  • David
    ... first in the world that ... has an electrolyser to ... is used for heat and ... That s actually a pretty cool house! The article does, however, contain
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 21, 2004
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      --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "XK SAZ" <swezlex1@y...> wrote:
      > Did you see this?
      > An architect in Malaysia has built a Solar-Hydrogen Eco-house, the
      first in the world that
      > is fully self-sustainable and runs entirely on hydrogen. The house
      has an electrolyser to
      > generate hydrogen that runs off of solar panels, then that hydrogen
      is used for heat and
      > electricity for the house.
      >

      That's actually a pretty cool house! The article does, however,
      contain one obvious error. It says, "Hydrogen is the most abundant
      element in the atmosphere. I believe it is the fuel of the future."
      Hydrogen may indeed be tghe fuel of the future, but nitrogen, not
      hydrogen, is by far the most abundant element in the atmosphere.

      >
      > Same with oil, it "seems" cheap up front but in reality it took a
      very long time to
      > make(fossil fuel), we are spending a huge amount of money on
      military technology and
      > personell in order to control easy access oil rich regions.
      "Cheapness" only means that the
      > men at the top will reap more immediate financial/political
      bennefits, not that it actually
      > costs less for everyone.
      >

      Oh no, you're not going to sucker me into THAT debate! I could cite
      several different things that show without a doubt that oil is NOT the
      reason for the war in Iraq, but those reasons are readily found on the
      web. I really don't feel like going back over that again.

      Anyway, to get back to your point, yes, electricity has only been
      around for a short time. Consider, however, that the alternate means
      of generating electrical power have been around for even less time.
      The best way to generate electricity on a large scale is still to spin
      a generator. The best way to spin a generator constantly day after
      day, year after year, is still either by high pressure steam or
      falling water. Even if hydrogen were to come into wide useage
      tomorrow, the current technology for manufacturing hydrogen on a large
      scale requires fossil fuel.

      I have no doubt that as technology improves, better means of power
      generation will be developed and put into large scale use. I fully
      support that. However, right now, today, it isn't feasible.
    • David
      ... doing them? I honestly don t know. I remember the issue being raised, but I don t remember what exactly was being done. I ll look around and see what I
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 21, 2004
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        --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "XK SAZ" <swezlex1@y...> wrote:
        > What kind of unauthorized experiments were they doing? Why were they
        doing them?

        I honestly don't know. I remember the issue being raised, but I don't
        remember what exactly was being done. I'll look around and see what I
        can find.

        >
        > I have been a technician before. Because technology breaks, its
        inevitable that you have to
        > do "experimentation" in order to fix the problems that come up.
        Sometimes you don't
        > know what is causing the problem in complex machines. Due to human
        error, and the fact
        > that machines break, we should not be relying on something so
        dangerous when it fails.
        >

        Sure technology fails! That's why nuclear power plants, at least in
        the western world, have all kinds of safety systems and backups built
        in.
      • XK SAZ
        One of the cameras on Soho is facing the wrong way. Its facing to the left of the sun. You can t see the sun but you can see a bunch of stars and the light
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 23, 2004
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          One of the cameras on Soho is facing the wrong way. Its facing to the left of the sun. You
          can't see the sun but you can see a bunch of stars and the light coming from the sun to
          the
          right. I don't know which camera it is.

          http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap040419.html
          It was a comet!!! I could only see this on the LASCO instrument because most of the Soho
          shots are so close to the sun you can't see anything. I thought it was a cosmic ray...

          April 22, 2004
          Recovery from ESR has been postponed until tomorrow.
          SOHO entered ESR (safe) mode at 07:27 UT. The ESR was tiggered by another spurious
          FSPAAD (Fine Sun Pointing Attitude Anomaly Detector) anomaly. Recovery is in progress.
          April 21, 2004
          SOHO entered ESR (safe) mode at 05:37 UT. The ESR was tiggered by the FSPAAD (Fine Sun
          Pointing Attitude Anomaly Detector)

          Even if hydrogen were to come into wide useage
          > tomorrow, the current technology for manufacturing hydrogen on a large
          > scale requires fossil fuel.

          There are other ways. In LA there is a bus company which makes hydrogen from solar a
          solar array right at the pump station. There is an algae research farm that efficiently
          makes hydrogen.
        • David
          As you ve found, SOHO has had experienced two ESR (Emergency Sun Reacquisition) events. At this time, there isn t any scientific data being returned from
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 23, 2004
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            As you've found, SOHO has had experienced two ESR (Emergency Sun
            Reacquisition) events. At this time, there isn't any scientific data
            being returned from SOHO.

            >
            > Even if hydrogen were to come into wide useage
            > > tomorrow, the current technology for manufacturing hydrogen on a large
            > > scale requires fossil fuel.
            >
            > There are other ways. In LA there is a bus company which makes
            hydrogen from solar a
            > solar array right at the pump station. There is an algae research
            farm that efficiently
            > makes hydrogen.

            That's great! Like I've said...I don't mean to imply that the current
            state of affairs is the best way, or that it can't be improved upon.
            The technologies you've mentioned are all potentially viable
            alternatives. In time, I have no doubt they will come into wider use.
            However, it will take time, and during that time, oil is still the
            fuel that drives the machines of industry, manufacturing, and
            transportation.
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