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See you on the dark side of the moon

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  • mike@usinter.net
    http://www.predictweather.com/articles.asp?ID=11 quote: --------------------------------------------------------------- ... Tropical cyclones develop mainly
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 19, 2004
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      http://www.predictweather.com/articles.asp?ID=11


      quote: ---------------------------------------------------------------
      ------- Cyclones - what causes them?
      Tropical cyclones develop mainly when the seas reach a temperature of
      about 28degC and this usually occurs when the Sun is over a
      particular hemisphere and close to or past its solstice position of
      that tropic, which will allow sufficient time for the Sun's rays to
      heat the sea to that critical temperature.

      The reason there are no cyclones off Brazil is probably due to the
      very large volume of cold fresh water from the Amazon that keeps the
      temperature of the adjacent oceans below that required for a cyclone
      to form. Where conditions are warm enough for them to form, the
      heating process will continue after the Moon has crossed the equator
      and into the other hemisphere. The build-up of heat will be speeded
      to that level during a Full moon phase and into the Last Quarter
      because that is the time for the low atmospheric tide, both from the
      Moon being a night moon and because the Moon is over the opposite
      hemisphere.

      Also, if the Moon is at perigee, the atmospheric tide will be even
      lower because of the greater gravitation effect from the Moon in that
      period. Occasionally the New moon will also cause a TC to form, due
      in part to the increased gravitational pull occurring and especially
      if the Moon is at or near to crossing the equator at this time.

      2001/2: Cyclone "DINA" appeared on 25th of January, which was 4 days
      after Last Q.

      "CHRIS"; formed 3 days afterward on February 8th, 3 days after Last
      Q, and reached here after a few days.

      Cyclone "GUILLAME" formed 2 days after a Last Q.

      Cyclone "DES" formed a day after a Last Q.

      All in all there were about 14, including Trina, Pam, Waka, Bernie,
      Dina, Eddy, Chris, Claudia, Guilliame and Des. They all formed at the
      same time of the Moon's phase cycle, aided by perigees.

      The perigee is now occurring in the southern hemisphere. The perigee
      had been in the northern hemisphere for 3 or 4 years but after
      January 2003 it started to occur south of the equator and it will now
      stay south for 3 or 4 years. This is a very regular 8.85 year cycle.
      Southern perigees bring destructive weather to the southern
      hemisphere.

      Another factor is the 11-year cycle of solar activity, and we are
      entering a cooling phase now after experiencing a peak. This will now
      begin to diminish the potential for increased heat from the summer
      Sun, meaning again that less cyclones may be expected and this will
      be added to, once the perigee of the Moon has passed to the south.

      Comment:

      The moon roils the oceans and changes its conductivity. But pure
      coupling of cloud behavior and moon activity doesn't occur because
      the whole complex system is modulated, or dampened, by the biosphere
      and conductivities it creates or deletes.
    • mike@usinter.net
      Ken Ring, a former New Zealand maths teacher, may be a very clever weather watcher. Or perhaps he is just lucky. On July 13 the Herald reported the bold tip of
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 22, 2004
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        Ken Ring, a former New Zealand maths teacher, may be a very clever
        weather watcher. Or perhaps he is just lucky.

        On July 13 the Herald reported the bold tip of the long-range weather
        forecaster from Auckland, who calls himself the "moon man". On
        Saturday, August 14, Sydney's skies would open. "It will be the start
        of a week of rain ... It will rain right through to the 20th," he
        said

        But the weather bureau suggested yesterday that his success in
        predicting this week's rain had more to do with chance than
        science. "One out of one is not statistically significant," a
        spokeswoman said, adding that Mr Ring's forecasts would "need
        verification over years. I think we'll wait and see."

        Mr Ring said yesterday that there was more rain on the way, although
        not for another month or so. "The next lot will begin on September
        23."

        Sydney Morning Herald

        http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2004/08/20/1092972748463.html?
        oneclick=true

        Comment:

        Moon gravity waves cause roilings and GAS EXCHANGE increases in
        CONDUCTIVITIES. GAS EXCHANGE is about CO2! So is life. In the oceans,
        conductivity and life have been tied together even before there was
        cellular life. And the moon roiling the oceans and gas exchanges and
        nucleotides in parasols have been so tied--as a feedback merely has
        to then passively increase rainfall and follow up storms and sort the
        solution from the nucleotides that fall back down as rain, not cause
        the storm directly.

        +++++++++++

        The world is quickly running out of oil and there are no more great
        oil fields to find. The clock is ticking and the doomsday nightmare
        is quickly approaching

        Is there a master plan out there to forestall this impeding economic
        meltdown?

        In January 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy estimated the world's
        supply of unexploited oil reserves the world supply of oil will be
        totally exhausted 35 years from now (June 2003).

        http://members.aol.com/mpwright9/oil.html

        For its part, OPEC now expects global oil consumption this year to
        reach 81.18 million barrels a day , up 280,000 barrels from an
        earlier estimate.

        http://www.nytimes.com/2004/08/20/business/20CND

        Total oil resources (both discovered and undiscovered, excluding oil
        already produced) are 2,311 Billion Barrels.

        http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/iea/table82.html ).

        If all the oil will be gone in 35 years at current consumption rates
        then with even a modest growth when will it run out?

        When supply and demand forces the price of oil above $100 a barrel we
        will see a world wide economic depression that dwarfs the American
        depression of the 1920's.
      • David
        ... When I do the math, I come up with about 1.04 trillion barrels over next 35 years, based upon the 81.18 billion/day consumption rate. That s less than half
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 23, 2004
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          > If all the oil will be gone in 35 years at current consumption rates
          > then with even a modest growth when will it run out?
          >

          When I do the math, I come up with about 1.04 trillion barrels over
          next 35 years, based upon the 81.18 billion/day consumption rate.
          That's less than half of the figure you gave for the estimated reserves!

          > When supply and demand forces the price of oil above $100 a barrel we
          > will see a world wide economic depression that dwarfs the American
          > depression of the 1920's.

          You're assuming that there won't be any new technologies developed in
          the next 35 years, which I don't see as a viable assumption.
          Necessity is the mother of invention. If and when the price of oil
          becomes too expensive to be economicially viable, you can bet there
          will be new technologies.
        • mike@usinter.net
          Oops. It s millions, not billions. I just cut and pasted it, so it wasn t my mistake :) ... rates ... reserves! ... barrel we ... American ... in
          Message 4 of 4 , Aug 24, 2004
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            Oops. It's millions, not billions. I just cut and pasted it, so it
            wasn't my mistake :)

            --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, "David" <b1blancer1@e...>
            wrote:
            >
            > > If all the oil will be gone in 35 years at current consumption
            rates
            > > then with even a modest growth when will it run out?
            > >
            >
            > When I do the math, I come up with about 1.04 trillion barrels over
            > next 35 years, based upon the 81.18 billion/day consumption rate.
            > That's less than half of the figure you gave for the estimated
            reserves!
            >
            > > When supply and demand forces the price of oil above $100 a
            barrel we
            > > will see a world wide economic depression that dwarfs the
            American
            > > depression of the 1920's.
            >
            > You're assuming that there won't be any new technologies developed
            in
            > the next 35 years, which I don't see as a viable assumption.
            > Necessity is the mother of invention. If and when the price of oil
            > becomes too expensive to be economicially viable, you can bet there
            > will be new technologies.
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