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Reefs

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  • Mike Doran
    Marine scientists discover nutrient pollution boosts fungi, bacteria killing Caribbean reefs November 26, 2003 CHAPEL HILL -- In the Caribbean Sea, coral reefs
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 27, 2003
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      Marine scientists discover nutrient pollution boosts fungi, bacteria
      killing Caribbean reefs

      November 26, 2003

      CHAPEL HILL -- In the Caribbean Sea, coral reefs -- those gorgeous,
      eye-popping, fish-nourishing, ship-scraping biological wonders that
      are among the region's crown jewels -- continue to die rapidly, a
      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill biologist says. Their
      future looks bleak.

      <snip>

      "The good news is that we might be able to do something about
      lowering the growing nutrient levels through regulations or other
      methods," Bruno said. "It's close to impossible to do anything about
      rising temperatures and other effects of what humans are doing to
      the environment."

      University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


      Comments:

      What needs to be appreciated is there is a symbiotic relationship
      between fungus, bacteria and reefs in that the reefs have a certain
      conductivity meaning, attracting biological containment, and hence
      electrical containment, to a specified, fixed place. Algae and fungi
      populations, again, are triggered by TEMPERATURE changes, and, again,
      impact cirrus above, and cloud nucleation. Stress brings on the
      reaction, and it is the ocean life literally saying, my chemistry and
      temperature isn't good, lets change and feedback something different.
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