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Shear and Barry?

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  • Pawnfart
    Alright. This is complicated and seems to NOT be related to Barry, but try to hang w/ it. The reward is a zen like understanding of just exactly what a
    Message 1 of 702 , Aug 3, 2001
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      Alright. This is complicated and seems to NOT be
      related to Barry, but try to hang w/ it. The reward is a
      zen like understanding of just exactly what a
      tropical storm is. The applicable rule is Fleming's RIGHT
      hand rule. HOWEVER, magnetic NORTH is really MAGNETIC
      SOUTH. The idea is that a bar magnet w/ a magnetic north
      wants to point to a bar magnet w/ a magnetic south,
      cause opposits attract. Turns out that the earth
      behaves like a bar magnet w/ magnetic "north" like
      magnetic south on a bar magnet. Now, Fleming's RIGHT hand
      rule says that for a conductor MOVING through a
      magnetic field, and in this case the conductor is the
      surface of the ocean, WESTERN currents will generate and
      UPWARD electrical vector. This vector electrifies the
      surface of the ocean like charge plate of a capacitor
      and, get this, enhances cirrus cloud formation.
      Conversely, the EASTERN currents go the other way. A tropical
      storm has internal organization such that these forces
      band, and a low is as electrical as it is a physical
      occurance. <br><br>Now, whether you debate this theory or
      not, let's apply it w/ Barry. The Gulf of Mexico
      already has a gyre and surface movements independant of
      the winds of Barry. In this case, there is a bulge
      over the central portion of the Gulf and this is
      really the manefestation of the angular momentum of the
      gyre in the Gulf, created by Ekman currents in
      relation to Coriolis forces right turning the surface
      currents. English? There is a current in the Gulf on the
      Surface that moves like a spiral clockwise. To the RIGHT
      of this spiral the surface winds ENHANCE cirrus
      electrically, to the left, DECREASE cirrus.<br><br>The problem
      with Barry is that its winds are moving WEST on the
      top of the storm. Normally, this should move ocean
      surface waters and enhance cirrus--but these winds
      contrast the very direction of the Gulf itself. They
      clash. If you can conceptualize it, that is where the
      dry line comes from to the north and the monsoon to
      the west of the region.<br><br>Sources for cirrus
      enhancement WERE the western side of the basin below Cuba and
      the western side of the Gulf--where they converged in
      Florida. But those conditions no longer exist, and Barry's
      winds are blowing against the Gulf gyre. That is your
      "shear". Yes, it is about winds, but not really.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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