Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

China dam update

Expand Messages
  • Pawnfart
    The anomalies that are off the chart are in Asia, as I predicted, relative to China dam and delta changes. Understand that the myolin sheath effect of
    Message 1 of 702 , Aug 2 11:56 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      The anomalies that are off the chart are in Asia,
      as I predicted, relative to China dam and delta
      changes. Understand that the myolin sheath effect of
      biological activity is not as effective later in the summer
      to transport cirrus and precip to places like the
      Pac NW where I<br>live (or where Mt. Shasta is losing
      glacial ice). But as the sed and detritus flows later and
      insulates the deep counters in the east Pac<br>and China
      Sea, it provides conditions for local flooding and SST
      warming.<br><br>Of particular interest is the Sea of Okhotsk, which
      is unreal with its SST anomaly warm conditions, yes,
      on the WESTERN aspect of its gyre. This is an inland
      sea that usually melts its ice sheet by the end of
      March, and the sheet was there in May. So what's the
      source of the warm anomaly?<br><br>The ocean? PDO?
      Please. It could only be cirrus and the electrical aspect
      I am discussing. And the regional problem is
      related to dam and delta changes by the Chinese,
      IMHO.<br><br>Here is the next important prediction. Understand this
      well. As these northern gyres get moving, guess what?
      Yep. The Arctic melts. It<br>directly has little to do
      with CO2 at this time. Indeed, w/ the dams, there is
      overall cooling IMHO, just like what occurred during our
      Dust<br>Bowl. But if the dams were not masking this heat, the
      CO2 enhancement of the methanogens would be so clear
      that even a skeptic like John Daly<br>would have
      difficulty picking temperature sites to fool people with
      intellectually criminal straw men.<br><br>My mountain, the one I
      was supposed to climb this year, but is too crappy to
      climb, Mt Shasta, is the subject, along with other
      mountains, of<br>John Daly's recent pages professing
      skepticism about glaciers melting worldwide in higher lats.
      But John won't explain the magnetic field anomaly
      near India, or the SST anomalies near China. And he
      won't write about Lindzen's iris, and comment on his
      failure to address direction of current, ENSO, or biology
      with his selection of data. Skeptics of the climate
      debate really need to look at their bias, I
      think.<br><br>_________________________________________________________________<br>> ____<br>> ><br>> > To unsubscribe
      from this list, please send an email to<br>> >
      debate-off@... from the appropriate email<br>> >
      account.<br>> <br>> <br>>
      _______________________________________________________________________<br>> ____<br>> <br>> To unsubscribe from this
      list, please send an email to <br>>
      debate-off@... from the appropriate email <br>> account.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
      • 0 Attachment
        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.