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No kidding, Albert?

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  • Mike Doran
    Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results - A. Einstein This quote has historical significance. In the years
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 31, 2003
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      "Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting
      different results" - A. Einstein

      This quote has historical significance. In the years following the
      1920s when Einstein dominated the world of physics, Einstein kept to
      his general theory of relativity and attempted to use it to solve a
      unified theory of the universe in spite of the fact that quantum camp
      of Neils Bohr et al began to dominate the ken of physics. He ignored
      his peers and he died trying to solve this problem, becoming a sort
      of object of pity in the field. That said, the general theory of
      relativity works well with large objects, and quantum mechanics--
      small. It was only after the study of black holes where large and
      small collide--did string theory arise.

      Me, what I am interested in is Einstein's brain was preserved for
      science and it was discovered that the part of the brain used for
      math processes was unusually large. I would advocate a systems
      approach for solving problems, although I will admit that I have a
      tendency to revisit the biological sciences.

      Gaia came AFTER cirrus sorting. Let me explain. Between conductive
      ionosphere and cloud top, an ice particle which contained a
      nucleotide would rise to a level equating to its weight and charge.
      This won't necessarily modulate surface chemistry or temperatures.
      But it will allow a sorting which causes the nucleotides to
      eventually fall as a group sorted and concentrated by like weight and
      charge. It is an interesting intermediate state. So "life" really was
      small before it was gaia.

      I might be smart but I ain't no Einstein, eh?

      ++++++++++++++++

      The axis of oil: how a plan for the world's biggest pipeline
      threatens to wreak havoc

      http://news.independent.co.uk/world/environment/story.jsp?story=457996
      By Philip Thornton and Charles Arthur
      28 October 2003 08:23
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