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Moon and pre cellular gaia

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  • Mike Doran
    I have discussed here at some length the impact on the moon s gravity wave, which stirs the oceans and impacts momentary conductivities because the stirred
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 13, 2003
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      I have discussed here at some length the impact on the moon's gravity
      wave, which stirs the oceans and impacts momentary conductivities
      because the stirred oceans release gas and the gas exchanges (CO2 to
      carbonic acid and back) that put relatively more free electrons in
      the to the surface, which then reduces impedance to large scale low
      frequency electrical pulses. Tropical storm Bill this year followed a
      gravity wave, for instance. The stirring also brings up colder
      waters, and salt water, the colder it gets, the more resistance it
      offers to electrical currents. Also, upwelling brings nutrients that
      biological activity takes advantage of, so there is cummulation of
      chemistries biologically and then increases in conductivity. So the
      moon now produces a momentary stirring and increase in conductivity,
      and upwelling caused cooling adn decrease in conductivity, and then
      finally a biologically based increase in conductivity.

      I bring all this up because in the context of early, pre cellular
      Gaia and nucleotide sorting by cirrus, the moon would also be an
      important player in the early evolution of life. That is because the
      conductivity below cloud formations impacts the charge cummulations
      on the cloud tops and ionosphere further up, and therefore would
      impact the forcing by a particular nucleotide sequence. IOWs the
      feedback that brought to cloud behaviors the most heat retention by
      the cirrus clouds, which contain the nucleotide ions seeded in them,
      will meet a varying electrically condition DEPENDING ON THE MOON and
      its gravity waves. And this was no modern day gravity wave. The moon
      4 billion years ago was actually much closer to the earth than it is
      now, such that not only were tides 50 feet high or more, but the
      local impact, the local stirring, if you will, would have been that
      much more intense.

      This would have allowed the nucleotides to survive as a whole, then,
      with a certained ordered diversity of charges, which would depend on
      the area, the convection related heat that area would get, how much
      water there was to be impacted by the moon, and so forth. The result
      was that early nucleotide sequences were varied and complex to meet
      the changing earth electrical condition.
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