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coronal holes and magnetic lines of the sun

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  • SOAZ
    I looked everywhere for the distance the magnetic lines go from the sun but couldn t find anything. Did you?? There are so many earth facing coronal holes but
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 5, 2003
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      I looked everywhere for the distance the magnetic lines go from the
      sun but couldn't find anything. Did you??
      There are so many earth facing coronal holes but I wish we could view
      them from every perspective instead of just from the earth.
    • David
      ... Neither could I. As I said, the supposition is that they do eventually reconnect somewhere, but that somewhere could be a very long way out. I did find
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 5, 2003
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        --- In methanehydrateclub@yahoogroups.com, SOAZ <group@s...> wrote:
        > I looked everywhere for the distance the magnetic lines go from the
        > sun but couldn't find anything. Did you??
        > There are so many earth facing coronal holes but I wish we could view
        > them from every perspective instead of just from the earth.

        Neither could I. As I said, the supposition is that they do
        eventually reconnect somewhere, but that somewhere could be a very
        long way out. I did find these little tidbits :

        "Coronal holes appear dark areas of the corona when viewed in
        ultraviolet light. This elongated hole area from January 11, 2002 was
        one of the largest seen by SOHO. Although they are usually located at
        the poles of the Sun, coronal holes can occur other places as well.
        The magnetic field lines in a coronal hole extend out into the solar
        wind rather than coming back down to the Sun's surface as they do in
        other parts of the Sun. Thus, they are often the source of strong
        solar wind gusts that carry solar particles into space and possibly
        impact the Earth."

        http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/pickoftheweek/old/15jan2002/

        Lengthy, but interesting :
        http://solar-heliospheric.engin.umich.edu/Publications/soho7_len.html

        Also interesting :
        http://isass1.solar.isas.ac.jp/nuggets/2002/020111/020111.html

        As you read these, you may get a sense that we don't exactly know
        everything there is to know about the sun. That would be quite
        correct. Scientists didn't know that such things as Coronal Mass
        Ejections and coronal holes even existed until the 1970's when the
        first solar observing and X-ray satellites were launched. Solar and
        geomagnetic physics are fields of study within themselves, and
        numerous books have been written on the subjects. Albert Einstein
        said that how Earth's magnetic field is generated was one of the great
        mysteries of physics. That statement still holds true today. While
        it's assumed that it has something to do with the motion and
        convection of liquid iron deep within Earth's interior, nobody is sure
        of the exact mechanism.
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