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ENSO and Cirrus

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  • Pawnfart
    If someone like Lindzen got in my head he would be catatonic for at least a couple of months--but perhaps he doesn t get guilty about being so false and
    Message 1 of 702 , Jul 31, 2001
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      If someone like Lindzen got in my head he would
      be catatonic for at least a couple of months--but
      perhaps he doesn't get guilty about being so false and
      misleading when he is in such a leadership position on a
      world issue, whispering in Shrub's ear and all. Well,
      if he is following this discussion, I am going to
      answer that question on his 'iris' about why he ignores
      ENSO.<br><br>Alright, I am going to get technical, and if you are
      having trouble following, perhaps you shoudl go to the
      National Geographic links to wind vectors and think about
      Fleming's left had rule and try to follow me that way . . .
      <br><br>With the 11 year flaring changes, according to
      studies, the ozone increases about 2% from min to max of
      the cycle. The flaring event of April correspondes to
      a solar max, BTW. And I realize there are issues of
      back EMF that the stripping of the electrons would
      resolve that are related to flaring, and salinity and
      temperature changes in the oceans that couple the cirrus
      electrically. Anyway, the expanding and contracting of the
      ionosphere causes two vectors, one due east and the other
      due west, but with the curvature of the earth, the
      net vector is skyward or up, per Fleming's rule.
      <br><br>I have a bad drawing
      here:<br><br><a href=http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/flaring.html target=new>http://www.ssiatty.com/climate/flaring.html</a><br><br>It's hard to draw with a mouse.<br><br>Now, along the
      equator the ionosphere is largest. Yet, there is no van
      Allen belt there usually.<br><br>The van Allen belts
      match perfectly with the North and South equatorials,
      and all three currents were part of Lindzen's study,
      which are moving such that Fleming would cause a
      positive or<br>upward vector in addition to anything that
      would be inducted with the expansion and contraction of
      the ionosphere. Thus, there may be a relationship<br>
      you can define, in terms of the induction processes,
      between the sum of the flaring and the ocean movements
      where the equatorial gyres are<br> moving west and
      difference between them where the gyre is moving east.
    • b1blancer_29501
      On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That, coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
      Message 702 of 702 , Mar 1, 2002
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        On Feb 28th, the Interplanetary Magnetic Field
        swung to a strong south-pointing orientation. That,
        coupled with an elevated solar wind speed and density,
        triggered a G-1 class geomagnetic storm. The result was
        some high latitude aurora. See this link for a
        photgraph of aurora observed over Quebec :
        <a href=http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg target=new>http://www.spaceweather.com/aurora/images/01mar02/Moussette2.jpg</a> . As of right now, there are 3 sunspot regions,
        namely 9839, 9842, and 9845, that appear to be capable
        of producing M-class flares. Regions 9839 and 9842
        are close to rotating out of view over the western
        limb of the solar disk. Sunspot region 9845, however,
        is close to the sun's central meridian. A rather
        large coronal hole is also approaching the sun's
        central meridian, and coming into an Earth-pointing
        position. High speed colar wind gusts are likely around the
        first of next week.<br><br>The current solar and
        geomagnetic conditions are :<br><br>NOAA sunspot number :
        153<br>SFI : 188<br>A index : 10<br>K index : 1<br><br>Solar
        wind speed : 372.3 km/sec<br>Solar wind density : 4.4
        protons/cc<br>Solar wind pressure : 1.1 nPa<br><br>IMF : 8.4
        nT<br>IMF Orientation : 0.7 nT North<br><br>Conditions for
        the last 24 hours : <br>Solar activity was low. The
        geomagnetic field was quiet to unsettled. Stratwarm Alert
        exists Friday.<br><br>Forecast for the next 24 hours
        :<br>Solar activity will be low to moderate. The geomagnetic
        field will be quiet to unsettled.<br><br>Solar Activity
        Forecast :<br>Solar activity is expected to be low to
        moderate for the next three days. Region 9845 is a
        possible source for isolated M-class
        flares.<br><br>Geomagnetic activity forecast :<br>Geomagnetic field activity
        is expected to be mainly quiet to unsettled, until
        the onset of high speed stream effects from a
        recurrent coronal hole begin to develop by day three of the
        forecast period. Isolated active conditions are
        anticipated thereafter.<br><br>Recent significant solar flare
        activity :<br>None
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